Indoor Activities for Kids

posted by: January 11, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Curious Kid’s Science BookCover art for In Good TasteCover art for Paper ManiaAs the weather gets colder and the snow days start piling up, you may find yourself wondering what to do with your children now that they are stuck indoors more than usual. No need to sit them down in front of the television or computer — here are some great activity books for kids that are sure to alleviate their boredom and inspire their creativity.

 

The Curious Kid’s Science Book by Asia Citro encourages children to develop a scientific curiosity about the world around them. Citro points out that children are naturally inclined to ask questions about the way things work, making them “born scientists.” A science teacher herself, Citro reassures parents that the experiments in the book aren’t complicated and don’t need to be executed perfectly in order to have value — the main purpose of the experiments is to show kids how to use the scientific method and develop scientific skills. The book is divided into simple topics such as “plants and seeds,” “water and ice” and other concepts that introduce children to the basics of biology, chemistry, physics and even engineering. This book is great for parents of 4-7 year olds who want their children to start developing science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) skills early in their education.

 

Do you have a budding chef or a young Martha Stewart on your hands? In Good Taste by Mari Bolte is filled with fun recipes that kids can put together and package with style to give as great holiday gifts. Bolte encourages kids to be creative with their presentation and packaging as that is often what makes a gift go from being ordinary to extraordinary. Some of the gifts include pickles in decorated mason jars, homemade marshmallows wrapped in colorful cellophane and ribbon and bouquets of fruit cut into decorative shapes. She also includes a section at the end where multiple gifts from the book can be combined into themed gift baskets. This book is best for slightly older children in middle grades with an aptitude for cooking and an eye for aesthetic appeal.

 

For parents whose children are more interested in arts and crafts, Paper Mania by Amanda Formaro has a variety of projects for kids of all ages and skill levels. The projects include everything paper: from simple paper airplanes to magazine collages and mosaics, from toilet paper tube marble racetracks to papier-mâché masks and decoupage. Children will develop their skills with cutting, weaving, pasting, measuring, folding, coloring and more. Formaro is a mother and blogger who has been crafting with children for years. Her blog, CraftsbyAmanda.com, includes projects for both adults and kids — so parents can join in on the crafting fun too!


 
 

Alphabet Books: Not Just for Toddlers

posted by: October 28, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Rad American Women A-Z by Kate SchatzCover art for A to Z Great Modern Artists by Andy TuohyWriter Kate Schatz and artist Miriam Klein Stahl pair up to make their wonderfully colorful and informative book Rad American Women A-Z. Each woman gets a two-page spread with a graphic illustrated portrait and a few easy-to-read paragraphs. There are a myriad of different women including actresses, artists, scientists and activists. In addition to showing a variety of careers, Schatz and Stahl feature women with different socioeconomic backgrounds, races, ages, gender identifications and disabilities. Notable features include Kate Bornstein, a transgender writer and performance artist, “who reminds us to bravely claim our true identity,” and Temple Grandin, an autistic animal science professor, “who shows us the power of a brilliant mind.” Although the text is written at a fifth-grade level, the women featured can be shared with any age group, from kindergartners to adults.

 

A to Z Great Modern Artists, drawn by Andy Tuohy and with text by Christopher Masters, is the kind of aesthetically pleasing book to have on your coffee table for when you want to get absorbed into something interesting but don’t quite feel like engaging yourself in a novel or magazine. Each featured artist has a portrait drawn by Andy Tuohy that replicates the style of that artist—Piet Mondrian’s portrait is drawn in the signature geometric style of his artwork, while Andy Warhol’s portrait is done in his famous pop-art style. In addition to Tuohy’s creative portraits, each letter of the alphabet feels like its own exhibit and includes notable works of art from the featured artists. You’ll want to move through the book slowly, like you would when walking through an art museum, in order to fully appreciate all of the nuances of Tuohy’s creative design.


 
 

A Dream Delayed

posted by: November 28, 2012 - 7:51am

The Fantastic Jungles of Henri RousseauA painter who never gave up on his dream is the subject of the picture book biography The Fantastic Jungles of Henri Rousseau, written by Michelle Markel and illustrated by Amanda Hall. Making a living as a toll collector, Rousseau was restless. As much as he enjoyed his time spent in Parisian parks, he wanted to capture the beauty of nature he witnessed onto canvas. At the age of forty, he made his first attempts to paint the scenes he imagined.

 

Self-taught as an artist, Rousseau ventured into natural history museums and studied books and photographs to make his botanical and zoological paintings accurate. When he had enough paintings completed, he entered them into competitions. His "naïve" style, however, was met with the jeers of so-called expert art critics. Year after year, his paintings brought unintentional amusement to the establishment who found his paintings flat and simple. But decades later, attitudes on art had changed, and Picasso and other well-known artists led a re-evaluation and celebration of Rousseau’s work.

 

While none of Rousseau’s actual paintings are used in this book, Hall’s illustrations (in homage to his work) are astounding. Markel capably introduces the artist to a new audience of young readers who are likely unfamiliar with his work. Readers of this title are certain to remember Rousseau's style when encountering his paintings in the future. The message is clear without being overt – a dream delayed is better than a dream never realized.


 
 

British Invasion

posted by: June 27, 2012 - 9:11am

One DirectionOne Direction: What Makes You BeautifulDare to Dream: Life as One DirectionIf you have a tween in your life, chances are you’ve heard of the hot new band One Direction. A trio of new titles looks at this band and chronicles its amazing success. Superstars: One Direction; One Direction: What Makes You Beautiful by Mary Boone; and Dare to Dream: Life as One Direction, written by the band members, all offer the inside scoop behind the five young men who formed a boy band following rejection as solo acts on the X Factor in England.

 

Niall, Zayn, Liam, Harry, and Louis have taken the United States by storm, and ardent superfans will devour every juicy detail. Answers to such questions as why Zayn got each of his four tattoos, and what vegetable the guys received in the mail from an adoring fan will be inhaled by young music listeners. Most importantly, these boy band phenoms address what's next for One Direction, both personally and professionally.

 

In addition to facts and trivia about each member, each title includes plenty of photographs from concerts and their personal lives. “Directioners” will love reading about the guys’ dreams and private lives and will be able to discover a little bit more about the boys behind the band. Their debut album, Up All Night stunningly debuted at Number 1 on the Billboard charts. The CD, and a concert DVD with the same title, are also available at the library for your listening and viewing pleasure. You can see what all the fuss is about!


 
 
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