Cover Art for Amelia Earhart the thrill of it July 24th is celebrated annually as National Amelia Earhart Day, a day to honor the famous aviation pioneer and remember her birth. Amelia Mary Earhart was born on July 24, 1897 and was the first female pilot to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean.  Earhart disappeared in July of 1937 over the central Pacific Ocean near Howland Island during an attempt to make a circumnavigational flight of the globe.

 

Fascination with her life, career and disappearance continues today. A recently discovered photograph has renewed interest in her disappearance. Whether or not the mystery will ever be solved remains to be seen. Read and watch more about this fascinating pioneer with these books and dvds for all ages.

 


 
 

Happy Birthday, Malala!

posted by: July 12, 2017 - 7:00am

 

Cover Art for I am Malala

Happy 19th Birthday to Malala Yousafzai, the youngest-ever Nobel Prize laureate. Malala is a passionate human rights advocate, particularly when it comes to the education of women in her country of Pakistan. In October, 2012, Malala was shot and her attempted murder sparked a national and international outpouring of support. The shooting only encouraged Malala to continue her activism and she remains a source of motivation. Learn more about this inspirational young woman in her autobiography I Am Malala (also available in a young reader’s edition) or the documentary He Named Me Malala.


 
 

All Things Tudor

posted by: June 28, 2017 - 7:00am

Henry VIII was born on this day in 1491. Henry was the second Tudor monarch, reigning from 1509 until his death in 1547. Perhaps best remembered for his eight wives and assorted scandals, this monarch and the time period remain popular among readers and viewers.

Cover art for Anne Boleyn Cover art for Anne Boleyn: Fatal Attractions Cover art for The Boleyn Inheritance Cover art for Bring Up the Bodies Cover art for Catherine of Aragon Cover art for The Creation of Anne Boleyn Cover art for Henry VIIICover art for Inside the Court of Henry VIIICover art for A Journey through Tudor England Cover art for Katherine of Aragon Cover art for The King is Dead Cover art for The Lost Tudor Princess Cover art for The Man for all Seasons Cover art for The Other Boleyn Girl Cover art for The Other Tudors Cover art for Secrets of Henry VIII Palace Cover art for The Six Wives Cover art for The Six Wives of Henry VIIICover art for The Tudors Cover art for The Tudors


 
 

Who Thought This Was a Good Idea?

posted by: June 5, 2017 - 7:00am

Cover Art for Who Thought This Was a Good Idea?Are Barack and Michelle really that cool in person? What should you do if your IBS acts up during a business trip to the Vatican? How do you get a tampon dispenser installed in the West Wing? Alyssa Mastromonaco has answers to all of these questions in her new memoir Who Thought This Was a Good Idea?: And Other Questions You Should Have Answers to When You Work in the White House.

 

In 2005, Mastromonaco became Director of Scheduling for Illinois State Senator Barack Obama’s run for United States Senate and continued working for his presidential administration until resigning as Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations in 2014. With plenty of self-deprecating humor, Mastromonaco gives us an inside look at the challenges of working on a political campaign and the highs and lows of having your own office at the White House. Her stories will make you laugh, cringe and be happy that you are just in charge of your own schedule and not the President’s. While there are more than a few endearing Obama anecdotes, this is far from a political tell-all. At its heart, this is the story of one ambitious woman navigating a high-stakes career with few female role models. Anyone interested in politics will appreciate Mastromonaco’s insider tips and advice, while fans of Bossypants by Tina Fey and Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? by Mindy Kaling will especially appreciate the humor.


 
 

The Rules Do Not Apply

posted by: May 17, 2017 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Rules Do Not ApplyCareer. Spouse. Baby. Checking off boxes came easy for Ariel Levy, author of the short but intense new memoir The Rules Do Not Apply. The New Yorker staff writer knows now what she didn't know when she was younger and life seemed limitless. She spends her journey recounting, in agonizing observations, the ups and downs that have taken place in her life.

 

No one would accuse Levy of lacking self-confidence. As an only child growing up in the 1970s, Levy was raised to be independent. She pursued her writing career, languished in the New York excesses of the '90s and achieved success telling stories about "women who are too much." Boundaries were blurred. She had male and female lovers. By her own admission, there were times she wanted to "crawl into the pouch of a kangaroo" to protect her from own impulsiveness.

 

Levy spends much of the book coming to grips with the fact that she was not the only one who needed protecting. Despite marrying the woman of her dreams, a string of devastating losses forces her to confront her hubris and reconcile what she can. The most heartbreaking of these is depicted in a powerful 2013 award-winning article, "Thanksgiving in Mongolia," which originally appeared in The New Yorker magazine. Levy revisits this tragedy in sobering detail; it is the gut of the book.

 

The author of Female Chauvinist Pigs: Women and the rise Rise of Raunch Culture, Levy neutralizes the "perfect life" with unsparing writing that is also a surprisingly quick read. Those who enjoy Joan Didion and Cheryl Strayed will recognize those universal threads of tragedy, grief, remorse. It is the realization we don't always get what we want, and that the best laid plans are just that and no more.


 
 

Shirley Jackson

posted by: April 3, 2017 - 7:00am

Cover art for Shirley Jackson: A Rather Haunted LifeAlthough many readers still retain mental scars from Shirley Jackson’s chilling story The Lottery, fewer are familiar with the woman who wrote it. For those readers, Ruth Franklin’s Shirley Jackson: A Rather Haunted Life tells the story of one of America’s most controversial and tragically short-lived authors.

 

Who is Shirley Jackson? Even her fans can’t agree on that. Was she a serious writer of literary fiction such as We Have Always Lived in the Castle? Was she a practicing witch who wrote ghost stories like The Haunting of Hill House? Or was she the musing housewife who wrote humorous essays like Life Among the Savages? This fractured identity would suit one of her characters, who were often women pushed to their mental limits by society. And Jackson was not without her demons. She felt the judgment of others sharply — her two most vocal critics were her mother and her husband, which unfortunately would lead to her agoraphobia late in life. But Franklin’s biography doesn’t make the mistake of confusing Jackson with her characters. Instead, it presents her as a modern master whose talents harnessed, but were not indebted to, her demons.

 

Franklin’s book is not without it’s shades of light. We’re also treated to samples of the cartoons that Jackson drew of herself and others (yet another side of her creativity) and stories of Jackson’s troublemaking sense of humor (she would frequently present herself as a witch to the press and claim to have cast spells on critics of her work). It’s a biography worthy of one of America’s best and most debated writers. And it pairs well with The Lottery: The Authorized Graphic Adaptation, a visual retelling of her most famous story by artist Miles Hyman, Jackson’s grandson.


 
 

New Next Week on March 28, 2017

posted by: March 24, 2017 - 8:00am

The following titles will be released next week. Select any title to learn more or to request a copy. Be sure to visit our Hot Titles webpage for more exciting upcoming titles.

Cover art for Almost Missed You Cover art for The Ashes of London Cover art for Before This is Over Cover art for Black Book Cover art for Casey Stengel Cover art for Change of Seasons Cover art for A Crown of Wishes Cover art for The Devil's Feast Cover art for An Extraordinary Union  Cover art for Hashimoto's Protocol Cover art for How to Be a Bawse Cover art for It Happens All the Time Cover art for Miramar Bay Cover art for Mustache Shenanigans Cover art for My Darling Detective Cover art for A New Way to Bake Cover art for a Perfect Obsession Cover art for PhenomenaCover art for Red Clover Inn Cover art for Richard Nixon Cover art for The Satanic Mechanic Cover art for Strange The Dreamer Cover art for The Women in the Castle


 
 

Tranny

posted by: March 20, 2017 - 8:00am

Cover art for TrannyI attended an LGBTQIA safe space training on behalf of BCPL a few weeks ago, and at one point a woman raised her hand from the front of the room. “You told us earlier that calling someone ‘queer’ is hate speech,” she pointed out. “But it’s right there in the acronym. So why is that okay?” The presenter paused. “Honestly?” she said. “It’s inclusivity versus exclusivity. There’s a big difference between someone reclaiming a hateful word from a place of power and someone calling someone ‘queer’ from a place of ignorance.” I lead with this because I want you to understand all the different types of ‘power’ at work in Laura Jane Grace’s new memoir, Tranny: Confessions of Punk Rock’s Most Infamous Anarchist Sellout — co-written by Dan Ozzi — because there are many.

 

The word ‘tranny’ is one that Grace returns to over and over again throughout the book. “I don’t want to wait until all of my youth is gone,” she writes at one point, struggling with her decision to transition from male to female. “I don’t want to end up a sad, old tranny.” That word, tranny, has its roots in hate, as something sneered at transgender individuals for decades, but most often directed with vitriol at birth-assigned men wearing women’s clothing. Like so many other words whose origins are founded in hate speech, it was reclaimed by the very community it was designed to hurt, but because of the common target, the word came to carry a very specific connotation. So when the author refers to herself as a tranny in the book, it’s important to understand that she isn’t saying she wants to be a man wearing women’s clothing — she wants to be a woman. That disconnect between a person’s identity and their biology is what’s referred to as “gender dysphoria,” and it occupies the heart of Laura Jane Grace’s story. 

  
And it’s a hell of a story. Laura Jane Grace shifts seamlessly between the raw, untempered emotion of personal journal entries and the calmer, more methodical reflection of a memoir. More than anything else, Tranny showcases how dysphoria and dysfunction often go hand in hand, one informing the other and often feeding into each other. In an effort to feel normal and escape this ever-present notion of “her,” Grace documents her descent into hard drugs, alcoholism and (maybe worst of all) corporate punk, only to emerge triumphant in the third act and then...stop. Tranny is a unique memoir insomuch that it doesn’t end on a blindingly positive note that leaves the reader with the sense that they all lived happily ever after. Laura Jane Grace doesn’t “win,” not really. What she does do is close the chapter on an achingly and viscerally painful period in her life and begin a new chapter that’s arguably just as painful and hard, but also wholly worthwhile and finally true to who she is. Tom Gabel dies, but maybe that’s what he wanted all along. It sure seems that way.

 

If you love a good heart-wrenching biography, the not-so-secret politics of the music industry and/or especially self-aware sellouts, Tranny is the book you’ve been waiting for. It will break your heart and it will make you laugh and you will pump your fist when Laura Jane Grace screams at a pharmacist in Florida loud enough to silence everyone who ever had the audacity to say “you’re not a real punk.” Against Me!, Grace’s band, has a long, storied history, but are entirely worth listening to, particularly their two most recent albums: Transgender Dysphoria Blues and Shape Shift With Me, both of which are about as far from corporate as you can get. Laura Jane Grace remains an excellent human being to follow.

 


 
 

New Next Week on March 21, 2017

posted by: March 17, 2017 - 8:00am

The following titles will be released next week. Select any title to learn more or to request a copy. Be sure to visit our Hot Titles webpage for more exciting upcoming titles.

Cover art for The 1997 Masters Cover art for The Arrangement Cover art for Bound Together Cover art for Captain Fantastic Cover art for The Collapsing Empire Cover art for Dead Man Switch Cover art for The Devil and Webster Cover art for The First Love Story Cover art for The Gargoyle Cover art for Grace Notes Cover art for The Greatest Story Ever Told- So Far Cover art for The Ground Beneath Us Cover art for The Hope Chest Cover art for If Not You For Cover art for Ike and McCarthy Cover art for Man Overboard Cover art for Mercies in Disguise Cover art for Mississippi Blood Cover art for Murder on the Serpentine Cover art for My Life to Live Cover art for No One Cares About Crazy People Cover art for The Novel of the Century Cover art for The River of Kings  Cover art for Scared SelflessCover art for The Secrets you Keep Cover art for Sensemaking Cover art for A Simple Favor Cover art for The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Cover art for a Twist of the Knife Cover art for Vicious Circle Cover art for Wake a Sleeping Tiger


 
 

New Next Week on March 14, 2017

posted by: March 10, 2017 - 7:00am

The following titles will be released next week. Select any title to learn more or to request a copy. Be sure to visit our Hot Titles webpage for more exciting upcoming titles.

Cover art for The Art of Discarding Cover art for Before the War Cover art for The Body Builders Cover art for it Both Born Cover art for Chameleon in a Candy Store Cover art for Cheech Cover art for The Cutthroat Cover art for Deadliest Enemy Cover art for The Devil's Triangle Cover art for Every Wild Heart Cover art for Everything Under the Heavens Cover art for The Fall of Lisa Bellow Cover art for The Family Gene  Cover art for The Forgotten Girls Cover art for Free Women, Free Men Cover art for Her Secret Cover art for Heretics Cover art for Himself Cover art for The Idiot Cover art for In This Grave Hour Cover art for Martin Luther Cover art for Never Let You Go Cover art for Never Out of Season Cover art for One of the Boys Cover art for Printer's Error Cover art for the Rules Do Not Apply Cover art for Strangers Tend to Tell me Things Cover art for Pretend The Truth About Your Future Cover art for Utopia For Realists Cover art for The Wanderers Cover art for White Tears Cover art for The Woman on the Stairs Cover art for Writer, Sailor, Soldier, Spy


 
 

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