The Lost Track of Time

posted by: June 12, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for "The Lost Track of Time"

Reminiscent of Alice in Wonderland and The Wizard of Oz, The Lost Track of Time by Paige Britt is a delightful, charming fantasy perfect for the middle grader.


Penelope is an overscheduled young writer who has run out of ideas as well as time to write. One day, Penelope's calendar is completely clear and she is elated! Her mother, however, quickly tries to rectify the mistake. Penelope runs away and falls into "the Lost Track of Time" and discovers the Realm of Possibility where she begins her quest to find the Great Moodler. Being careful to avoid the Clockwatchers, the Naughty Woulds and Wild Bores, she relies on getting Inklings and following Hunches to find her way to Chronos City. Meeting interesting and imaginative creatures along the way, Penelope must use all of her cunning and wits to defeat the evil Chronos, free the Great Moodler and get her writing ideas back.


Filled with wonder as well as fabulous illustrations, The Lost Track of Time will touch a nerve with today’s overscheduled world. It is beautifully written with wonderful wordplay, adventure and excitement. Beautiful drawings by illustrator Lee White enhance the already delightful story. Grownups and children alike will adore this novel. Fans of The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster and The Chronicles of Narnia series by C.S. Lewis will also enjoy this book.


The Terrible Two

posted by: May 19, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Terrible TwoIn the battle of the pranksters, there can be only one winner. In The Terrible Two by Mac Barnett and Jory John, prankster Miles Murphy, already disgusted at having to start a new school in a tiny little town famous for cows, is dismayed to find there is already a reigning school prankster. When Miles discovers the current practical joker is really quite good, he challenges himself to outdo the unknown perpetrator and sets about creating elaborate tricks, only to be thwarted at every turn.


Admitting defeat, he joins together with his nemesis to form the Terrible Two. They take the Prankster’s Oath and plan the greatest caper in the history of Yawnee Valley! Barnett and John have teamed together to create a wonderfully fun book about friendship, creativity and cows. Hilarious illustrations are provided by Kevin Cornell. An added educational component includes numerous fun facts about cows. Did you know cows can climb up stairs, but not down?


A fast, funny read, The Terrible Two is the first in a planned series of four books and has already been optioned for a movie. Fans of Jeff Kinney’s Diary of Wimpy Kid and Tom Greenwald’s Charlie Joe Jackson’s Guide to Not Reading will devour this series.



Fish in a Tree

posted by: April 28, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Fish in a Tree“Everyone is smart in different ways. But if you judge a fish on on its ability to climb a tree, it will spend its whole life thinking that it’s stupid.” — Mr. Daniels quoting “a wise person” in Fish in a Tree by Lynda Mullaly Hunt.


In Hunt's new novel, sixth grader Ally is one such Fish in a Tree. Because her father is in the military, Ally has transferred to her sixth school, where she is already known as a troublemaker. She will do anything to get out of reading or writing, including defiantly drawing on the desk right in front of the teacher. When she gives her pregnant teacher a sympathy card at her baby shower, her teacher and principal are horrified. The reader, however, knows the truth: Ally can’t read.


Expertly portraying the reality of a learning disability and the impact it has on a child’s academic and social life — as well as her self-esteem — Hunt delivers a heartfelt, beautiful story about school, friendship and hope. Ally’s savior is her new substitute teacher, Mr. Daniels. Besides figuring out her secret, he convinces Ally that she is smart and that he can help her. New friendships with other “outcasts” boosts her morale and brings a little more happiness to her life.


This is an overall great read with believable characters the reader will cheer for. Fans of Hunt’s other book, One for the Murphys, and R. J. Palacio’s Wonder will enjoy this book for its characters and theme of overcoming an obstacle to survive in middle school.



Power to the Little People

posted by: March 13, 2015 - 8:00am

Tales of Bunjitsu Bunny by John HimmelmanThe Princess in Black by Shannon HaleIsobel is the strongest, fastest, fiercest bunny in her Bunjitsu school, yet she tries her hardest to never hit anyone. Faced with tough challenges such as getting into a locked room, facing down bullies, dealing with nightmares and learning new fight strategies, Tales of Bunjitsu Bunny by John Himmelman teaches a lesson in every chapter. Join Isobel as she handles her problems in the most peaceful way possible, until she determines it is time to fight back! Great stories children will easily relate to, short chapters children can easily handle, along with charmingly simple illustrations make Bunjitsu Bunny a great choice for both a read aloud and for young independent readers. The Bunjitsu Code listed at the back of the book will empower your young readers to be their most powerful selves.


Princess Magnolia is a fancy-tiara-, frilly-pink-dress-wearing kind of princess, until her monster alarm sounds – then she becomes…the Princess in Black! While entertaining the nosy Duchess Wigtower, Princess Magnolia’s monster alarm sounds. As she quickly excuses herself to transform into the ninja princess hero that saves the day, she worries that the curious Duchess will discover her secret. With a pet unicorn that transforms into her black pony sidekick and a secret passageway to the Monster Land entrance, The Princess in Black by Shannon Hale and Dean Hale delivers all of the superhero accoutrements expected, including a young lad in distress – Duff. The first in a promising new series from the authors of Rapunzel’s Revenge and Calamity Jack, The Princess in Black grabs the reader in the first few pages and never lets go. With bright, beautiful illustrations by LeUyen Pham, it is perfect for both a read aloud and for the young independent reader (or for the young independent reader to read aloud!) This series is sure to be a favorite.


Innocence Lost

posted by: June 20, 2014 - 7:00am

Cover art for GaijinKoji Miyamoto’s 13th birthday is quickly tarnished by the attack on Pearl Harbor. As a half-Japanese American during World War II, Koji’s life dramatically changes on that fateful day. Gaijin: American Prisoner of War is a graphic novel by Matt Faulkner which describes this ugly period in American history in heartbreaking detail.

Koji’s day begins innocently enough as he listens to the Lone Ranger on the radio while helping his mother with the dishes. When the attack is announced, he and his mother have to look up Pearl Harbor in the atlas. Koji immediately wonders if his Japanese father could have been flying one of the attack planes. His father had returned to Japan the summer before to take care of a sick family member. After a night of bad dreams, Koji heads to school only to discover he is persona non grata everywhere — at school, on the streetcar and on the street. As the government increases restriction on Japanese Americans, Koji’s innocence is lost forever when he is sent to a “relocation camp.” Outside of the camp he is ostracized for being half-Japanese, inside he is tormented for being half-white.

Faulkner’s novel is a powerful piece of historical fiction told graphically. Koji’s journey to adulthood under terrible conditions is beautifully detailed in color as he deals with discrimination, tough choices and growing up. Faulkner also neatly teaches the reader about a dark piece of American history, when over 110,000 Americans were made prisoners of war in their own country.

For more information on the subject, Faulkner has created a website - www.gaijinamericanprisonerofwar.com.



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