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How to Hang a Witch

posted by: September 21, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for How to Hang a WitchBeing the new girl in high school can be rough for any teenager. But in Adriana Mather’s book How to Hang a Witch, Samantha Mather has more than prom dates and homework to worry about. With the setting in Salem, Massachusetts, and the last name of a person infamously connected to the Salem witch trials, it automatically brands her as being the bad apple in town.

 

Since the late 1600s, Salem has become synonymous with the hysteria of witchcraft and the “hanging of a witch.” A few names stand out during this time period as either being the accuser or the accused. Take a peek into how the descendants of these key players will play a pivotal role in the story and whether history repeats itself in this engaging tale. Adriana Mather does a great job of exploring the deadly consequences of peer pressure and bullying that teen audiences will relate to.

 

If you have an interest in this part of history or supernatural teen fiction, than you may want to check out this enjoyable read. If the title alone doesn't grab your attention than the last name of the author will, as she is related to the controversial figure of this story from colonial times. In the end, Mather creates a modern twist which parallels the lessons learned from this important part of history. Mix in a pinch of young love, some witchcraft, a generous amount of mystery, and a 300-year-old McDreamy ghost, and you have a recipe for a page-turner that will be finished in one sitting.

 

Teen readers with an interest in this time period may also enjoy the novel in verse Wicked Girls: A Novel of the Salem Witch Trials by Stephanie Hemphill.


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Revised: September 21, 2016