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Dear Mr. You

posted by: May 26, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Dear Mr. YouWhen you think celebrity memoir, a series of letters dedicated to various men isn’t necessarily what comes to mind first. But Mary-Louise Parker’s Dear Mr. You is more than that. Using letter writing as a vehicle, Parker explores her relationships with the men she has met, may meet or never got a chance to meet, and by doing so revels in the way her relationships shape her life.

 

While her letters are candid, ranging from the erotic to the brutally honest, Parker doesn’t indulge in any kind of exposé or scandal; in fact she rarely names the addressees by their full names, so anyone looking for scandalous celebrity gossip may be a bit disappointed in that regard. Instead, what Parker creates is a poetic addition to the memoir genre. She tells her life story by reflecting on the lives and experiences of others, from the grandfather she never knew to a cab driver she would never meet again. While not all memories of the men who have come and gone from her life are pleasant, Parker embraces the good and the bad — the impersonal stranger, the demanding mentor, the intimate lover — and thanks each for the mark they have left on her life.

 

Lyrical and poignant, Dear Mr. You is many things in one slim volume. It’s a contemplation of the impact men have on their relationships, and a reminder that even trifling interactions between two people can leave a lasting impression. Ultimately, it is an epistolary reflection on how a life is shaped by people — living, dead or imagined. Reminiscent of Joan Didion’s works, Dear Mr. You is a celebration of a life through the lens of relationships from the trivial to the significant.

 


 
 

Revised: May 26, 2016