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Looking for a Safe Place

posted by: March 11, 2015 - 8:00am

Where I Belong by Mary Downing HahnIn addition to being a Maryland-based author, Mary Downing Hahn is known for creating memorable characters who go through some tremendous situations that young readers can relate to. In Where I Belong, Hahn does it once again with Brendan Doyle, a misfit living in foster care who wants to find someplace where he can fit in and feel safe. Brendan’s life has been full of misfortune; abandoned at birth by his supposedly crack-addicted mother, he has bounced around in the foster care system until he feels completely unloved and unwanted. Yet, Brendan’s saving graces are his artistic ability and amazing imagination which allow him to escape the painful reality that surrounds him.

 

Brendan loves fantasy fiction, particularly stories about the Green Man and the creatures that live in the forest. When running away from some bullies, Brendan stumbles into the forest near his home and discovers an ancient oak tree that he feels would make a great fortress. Although he completes his treehouse, he totally neglects his schoolwork and is forced to enroll in summer school in order to enter middle school in the fall. At first, Brendan tries cutting class until his new teacher explains things in a way that finally makes sense. Brendan even tries to befriend Shea, a girl with her own painful secrets, and a mysterious stranger in the woods who may be the Green Man himself. It seems as if Brendan may finally have found two people he can care for until a series of events threatens to permanently destroy his world.

 

Hahn does an amazing job of capturing the way Brendan perceives his life and his frustrations about not being understood by people such as his teachers, school mates and foster mother. For both children in similar circumstances and adults who have experienced being an outsider, Brendan’s struggles to be himself yet longing to fit in somehow will resonate with them.


 
 

Revised: November 18, 2015