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Paranormal Quest

Paranormal Quest

posted by:
November 20, 2013 - 7:00am

Cover art ofr The Dream ThievesThe Dream Thieves, book two in Maggie Stiefvater’s four-book Raven Cycle series picks up after Gansey, Adam, Ronan and Blue woke the ley lines around the town of Henrietta at the end of The Raven Boys. Things are changing around them in ways none of them would have expected, ways that impede their search for the resting place of the legendary Welsh King Glendower. The second book raises the stakes of their quest and adds to the already richly detailed paranormal world that Stiefvater created in the first book.
 

Throughout the story, each of the main characters is distracted in some way from their hunt for Glendower. Gansey becomes frustrated with developments in his friendships with Adam and Ronan, and his inability to understand them. Adam has started distancing himself from his friends as a result of his personal involvement in waking the ley lines and his fear of being dependent on his rich Aglionby friends. Meanwhile, Blue becomes increasingly concerned about the prediction that her kiss will kill her one true love, which is further complicated by the love triangle forming between her, Adam and Gansey. All the while, Ronan, whose storyline takes precedence in The Dream Thieves, reveals that he can pull things from his dreams. This trait, inherited from his murdered father, is putting his life and the lives of his friends in danger as new evils come to Henrietta.
 

As their storylines seem to diverge from the search for Glendower, readers eventually find that all the stories come together and their quest takes a new and unexpected turn. The Dream Thieves’ many mysteries will keep readers enthralled, and the novel’s cliffhanger will leave them eagerly awaiting the third book in the series.

Laura

 
 

FBI Teen Task Force

FBI Teen Task Force

posted by:
November 13, 2013 - 7:55am

Cover art for The NaturalsJennifer Lynn Barnes, author of the Raised by Wolves series, has a newly released book, The Naturals. This novel is the first installment in a new Young Adult series. Barnes has a penchant for writing in the paranormal genre, but The Naturals is borderline realistic crime fiction.

 

Cassandra Hobbes is a “Natural,” even if she doesn’t know it yet. When she was very young, her mother Lorelai claimed that she was a psychic, when really she just profiled people based on small details she could glean from their appearance and comportment. Lorelai taught her daughter the tricks to profiling people so that she could help with her mother’s act. It is this ability to read people that sets Cassie apart.

 

After Lorelai’s disappearance and presumed death, Cassie had to move in with her grandmother because her father was serving in the military oversees.  Cassie has never felt like she fits in with her family, so when she is confronted by an FBI agent who asks her to move to Washington D.C. and join a special team of talented teens, she jumps at the opportunity. The eclectic group of gifted teens is brought together under one roof where they can hone their skills and help the FBI by working on cold cases.

 

The Naturals is equal parts Shadowlands by Kate Brian and the television series Criminal Minds, with interactions that are reminiscent of Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight series. The crime, action and sometimes gruesome depictions of murder scenes will take the reader on a wild ride, while the character development and smattering of romance will help to ease the tension.
 

Randalee

 
 

Falling in Love in a Day

Falling in Love in a Day

posted by:
November 7, 2013 - 7:00am

Just One YearJust One Year, the sequel to Gayle Forman’s teen novel Just One Day is the conclusion to Allyson and Willem’s whirlwind love story, told this time from Willem’s perspective. Picking up from when Allyson and Willem were separated in Paris, Just One Year follows Willem as he wakes up there, alone, confused and missing Allyson. After their day in Paris, Willem only knows Allyson as Lulu, a nickname he gave her based on her resemblance to actress Louise Brooks. Despite the small amount of time they spent together, their feelings for each other are strong.  Just as Allyson searched for Willem, tried to get over him and find herself in Just One Day, Willem does much the same in Just One Year.

 

As Willem travels the world, readers are taken along on his physical and emotional journey. Those who read both books will see the number of close misses Allyson and Willem had during the year following their single day together in Paris. But most of all, readers will enjoy learning who Willem really is. His secretive nature in Just One Day kept readers and Allyson second-guessing his motives. However in Just One Year, Willem’s character and his struggles are shown, and Forman makes him a relatable character.

 

For those who have read Just One Day and patiently (or not so patiently) waited for the conclusion, Just One Year will not disappoint. Forman writes a heartfelt end to Allyson and Willem’s love story, which romance fans will enjoy. As an added bonus, readers will feel like they have traveled the world with Allyson and Willem by the end of the two books. As she previously did with If I Stay and Where She Went, Forman does a fabulous job telling one story from two perspectives.

Laura

 
 

Going, Going, Gone

Going, Going, Gone

posted by:
November 5, 2013 - 7:00am

The Rules for DisappearingDancer, Daughter, Traitor, SpyLife on the run might appear glamorous. Travelling to new places, assuming new names and identities, and trying out new living arrangements all seem like obvious perks. But as the young heroines of two new teen novels learn, the truth is far from that.

 

In The Rules for Disappearing, by Ashley Elston, “Meg” (her latest identity) and her family have been in the Witness Protection Program for eight months, and have already lived in six different places. She is tired of the subpar housing and lifestyle, but mostly she is worried about the toll the program is taking on her family: her mom is drowning her anxieties and depression in alcohol, her little sister is a shell of her former self, and her father seems oblivious to it all. Mainly, Meg just wants to know what her father did to land them in the program in the first place. Elston creates grounded characters, realistic depictions of small-town high school life and a suspenseful mystery that draws the reader in.

 

In Elizabeth Kiem’s debut novel, Dancer, Daughter, Traitor, Spy, Marina is a young dancer living in the lap of luxury in the Soviet Union, thanks to her famous ballerina mother’s connections. But when her mother disappears, Marina and her father must defect to the United States to protect themselves. As Marina tries to continue her dance training, she must also juggle more practical responsibilities, navigate Manhattan and Brooklyn and adapt to the new capitalist culture. At the same time, Soviet secrets are casting a long shadow from halfway around the world, and what her family knows about the government cover-ups becomes the crux of this dark tale. Kiem brings the 1980s landscapes of gritty Brooklyn and frozen Moscow to life with a suspenseful story of overprotected teenager meets international intrigue.

Melanie

 
 

The Dark Side of the Moon

The Dark Side of the Moon

posted by:
October 29, 2013 - 7:00am

The Shade of the MoonA meteor knocked the moon dangerously close to the earth and brought about tsunamis that wiped out whole continents and blocked the sun from reaching the planet, permanently changing everything. Susan Beth Pfeffer concludes her teen dystopian series with the fourth installment The Shade of the Moon. The Life As We Know It series follows the lives of a family and their friends as they grapple with the world they now live in and their struggle to survive as everything and everyone around them perishes.

 

Jon Evans and his remaining family have found themselves in Sexton, a heavily guarded community known as an “enclave” where the inhabitants are referred to as “Clavers.” His position in the prestigious town is always in jeopardy and his whereabouts are shrouded in suspicion. He, his stepmother Lisa and stepbrother Gabe gained entry to Sexton with passes given to them by another family. Jon takes advantage of the life he leads where he has access to purified air, education, health care and food while others work while exposed to chemicals in the air.

 

One wrong move can be fatal and no one is safe from the prying eyes of the officials who run Sexton. They will do whatever they need to do in order to maintain the safety and order of their community. The Shade of the Moon examines what the world could be like in the event of such a tragedy and the lengths people will go to save the ones they love.

Courtney

 
 

Trusting a Memory

Trusting a Memory

posted by:
October 22, 2013 - 7:00am

Cover art for FracturedIn a world where nothing is what it seems and no one is safe to speak out against a tyrannical government for fear of disappearing forever, Kyla must be careful of the questions she asks and of every move she makes. In Fractured, book two of Teri Terry’s Slated trilogy, teenage Kyla has recovered some of the memories of who she was before she became a “Slated” and had her memory wiped clean of her past. Kyla is desperately looking for clues as to what happened to her friend Ben who disappeared after attempting to remove his “Levo,” a GPS and monitoring device fitted onto the wrists of all “Slateds” to keep tabs on them. Kyla fears that Ben is dead, along with so many others discarded by the “Lorders," those in charge of enforcing the laws of society.
 

When Kyla reconnects with Nico, a face from her past, she begins to “remember” things. But are they really her memories or imposters? Each step Kyla takes only leads to more questions, more danger and still people are missing. Kyla can’t even be certain if finding out who she was before she was slated will solve her problems or make them worse, but she knows one thing — she at least has to try.
 

Terry’s second installment to her trilogy is a fast paced read, aimed toward readers who enjoyed dystopian series such as Suzanne Collins’ The Hunger Games and Susan Beth Pfeffer’s Life As We Knew It.

Courtney

 
 

Debate team, flash mobs and broken hearts

Cover art for The Beginning of EverythingBefore The Beginning of Everything starts, Ezra Faulkner leads a pretty happy life. He’s the popular star of the tennis team with a beautiful girlfriend. That all changes the day he catches his girlfriend cheating on him at a party. After storming out of the party, he is hit by a car. In an instant, his tennis career ends and he goes from the most popular student at Eastwood High to the most pitied. Robyn Schneider’s new teen novel The Beginning of Everything picks up just after what Ezra calls his “personal tragedy,” as he gives up his tennis racket and joins the debate team, makes new friends, reconnects with old ones and falls in love again.

 

As Ezra settles in with his new less popular group of friends, he meets Cassidy Thorpe, a former debate champion who dropped out of her old private school, deserting her debate team and leaving a trail of secrets in her wake. Cassidy and Ezra are paired up as debate partners and eventually become friends as they prepare for debate tournaments and participate in flash mobs. It doesn’t take long for Ezra to fall for the mysterious Cassidy, despite his friend Toby’s warnings. Ezra tries to get to know Cassidy despite her reluctance to open up.

 

Schneider’s story is a funny, realistic teen novel that deals with Ezra’s ability to overcome his “personal tragedy,” and deal with life’s many issues that come after. The Beginning of Everything is perfect for fans of John Green’s novels who are looking for a new book that’s funny, while at times heartbreaking.
 

Laura

 
 

Water Water Everywhere

Water Water Everywhere

posted by:
October 16, 2013 - 7:55am

Cover art for Not A Drop To DrinkLibrarian Mindy McGinnis’s debut novel, Not a Drop to Drink, shows us just what it would take to live outside of civilization, doing whatever it takes to survive just one more day. Sixteen-year-old Lynn has spent her life defending her most precious commodity: her freshwater pond. The world’s water supply has run dangerously low, and the remaining population is struggling to make it at any cost. Some are packed into cities with strict rules for living and the ever- present threat of cholera looming. Others, like Lynn and her mother, make their own way, eking out a living in the country.

 

Their only neighbor, a mysterious older man named Stebbs, is their last link to the way things used to be, when people helped one another during tough times. When Lynn finds herself injured and alone after a violent attack, Stebbs helps her find her purpose and her place in the world. Lynn’s mother always taught her not to trust strangers – shoot first, ask questions later. What Lynn didn’t know was how strangers can become family more precious than the water she has guarded and how family, though bound by blood, can be really nothing more than strangers. Readers of teen dystopian fiction will be sure to find themselves loving Not a Drop to Drink.

Courtney

 
 

Secrets to Keep

Secrets to Keep

posted by:
October 3, 2013 - 7:00am

The Truth That's in MeOne day, Judith and her best friend Lottie both go missing. When Lottie is discovered dead several days later and Judith is nowhere to be found, the residents of her puritanical town fear the worst for their beloved girls. Several years later, everything changes when Judith appears on her mother’s doorstep with a terrible secret she has been violently forbidden to share with anyone in All the Truth That’s in Me by Julie Berry. Instead of being greeted with open arms, Judith finds herself shunned by all of those around her, including those she loves the most. In the time she’s been gone, the boy she intended to marry has moved on and found another, her father is dead, her mother and brother have written her off as damaged goods and the townspeople have drawn their own suspicious conclusions as to where Judith may have been all this time.

 

In her first novel for young adults, children’s book author Julie Berry creates a riveting story of the power that secrets can have over us. Written from Judith’s narrative point of view we see her find her strength even through her own silence. It’s a story of finding your own legs to stand on even in the face of pain, loss and tragedy. Readers who enjoy historical fiction with a hint of mystery and romance will find themselves unable to put this book down!

Courtney

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If at First You Don’t Succeed, Die, Die Again

A Midsummer Night's ScreamLove triangles, a cursed movie set, magic potions, gruesome murders; R.L. Stine’s newest teen fiction A Midsummer Night’s Scream has it all. Claire Woodward is a 16-year-old girl living a life of privilege in Hollywood. Her parents own a film studio and have finally given consent for her to act in one of their movies, the remake of Mayhem Manor. The excitement of being cast in a movie with her best friend as well as some notable actors is tempered when talk turns to how the movie set is cursed. The original Mayhem Manor was a horror film about six teens who get trapped in a spooky old house and one by one, die a terrible death. Shooting stopped after not one, but three of the actors died during the filming. Sixty years later the producers elect to reshoot the movie at the same location. Author R.L. Stine has proven to be a master of macabre with the success of his Goosebumps and Fear Street series, so readers will not be surprised when his newest novel takes a decidedly dark turn.

 

This story is part teenage romance, part horror story. There is a mystical element in the character of Benny Puckerman, who peddles magic potions, can only be seen by Claire and has his own agenda regarding the movie remake. Claire narrates the story in a casual conversational tone, at times directing comments to the reading audience. Those discerning readers looking for a sophisticated Shakespearean work should keep on looking, but if you are interested in a quick-moving, fantastical tale with a nice touch of suspense, A Midsummer Night’s Scream will really get your heart pumping.

Jeanne

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