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Love Letters Gone Awry

Love Letters Gone Awry

posted by:
July 16, 2014 - 6:00am

To All the Boys I've Loved BeforeJenny Han, author of the Summer series and coauthor of the Burn for Burn series, returns with the start of a new series, To All the Boys I've Loved Before. The main character, Lara Jean, and her sisters, Margot and Kitty, have always been incredibly close, taking care of one another since their mother passed away. The Song girls, as they call themselves to honor their mother's Korean heritage, run the household while their father, a doctor, is busy at work. As the novel begins, Lara Jean's happy, but sometimes boring life, gets turned upside down.

 

When Margot, the oldest of the Song girls heads off to college in Scotland, she breaks up with Josh, her boyfriend and the quintessential boy next door, who Lara Jean once secretly loved. Lara Jean wrote Josh a letter when he and Margot started dating so she could move on and stop loving him, a practice she's used with every boy she's loved before. She keeps the letters in a hat box, looking at them from time to time, but never sending them. One day, she finds the box and letters missing, and the boys she once loved start approaching her in school about the letters.

 

Lara Jean and Peter, one of the boys she loved in middle school, decide to pretend to date, so she can avoid awkwardness with Josh, and Peter can make his ex-girlfriend jealous. Readers will enjoy Lara Jean and Peter trying to keep up their dating charade, as she's forced to confront her feelings for all the boys and their feelings for her. To All the Boys I've Loved Before is a realistic, romantic teen book perfect for readers looking for a fun summer read! Be on the lookout for the sequel, P.S. I Still Love You.

Laura

 
 

To Be Young and a Liar

To Be Young and a Liar

posted by:
July 11, 2014 - 6:00am

Cover art for We Were Liars"My full name is Cadence Sinclair Eastman. I live in Burlington, Vermont, with Mummy and three dogs. I am nearly eighteen. I suffer migraines. I do not suffer fools."

 

So begins and ends E. Lockhart’s new book We Were Liars. Yet, by the end, the reader will have a much clearer perspective on the narrator's words. Cadence is part of the powerful and distinguished Sinclair family of New England. Every summer, the extended families vacation on their private island, each family set up in their own beautiful house. Idyllic? There’s been an unchallenged stoicism to the Sinclair family, but modernism with its myriad of issues is breaking to the surface: divorce, debt, addiction, the welcoming of outsiders — and the family hasn’t handled it well.

 

Then there’s Cadence herself. Every summer, she has been with her two cousins – Mirren and Johnny, later joined by Gat, the nephew of one of her aunt’s new husbands. They became known as “The Liars” for the trouble they caused as a group. But something happens on the island at the end of Cadence’s 15th summer, something of which she has no recollection, except that she almost drowned. Plagued by health issues, she doesn’t return until her 17th summer. She tried to reach out to her cousins and friend during her absence but heard nothing. No one else will talk about what happened that year, or what led up to her near death. Everyone tells her she must remember herself. Slowly, she recovers memories of her life that summer and puts pieces together to reveal a much darker family history. By the end, she will be face-to-face with grief and the full horror of events.

 

Told with beautiful poetic lyricism and sparse wording conveying rich description, this book shouldn’t be overlooked by adults or book clubs. Rife with character introspection, family dysfunction and mystery layered with fractured reality, in its final pages, We Were Liars packs a powerful punch. 

Melanie

 
 

Ballerina with a Secret

Ballerina with a Secret

posted by:
July 3, 2014 - 7:00am

Cover art for PointeTheo, short for Theodora, is a talented ballerina on her way to joining a professional ballet company when her life becomes infinitely more complicated. After her best friend Donovan disappeared when they were 13, Theo struggled with an eating disorder. Now, four years later, she feels like she’s recovered – that is until the fateful day when Donovan reappears, and new, unexpected complications pop up. Brandy Colbert’s debut, Pointe, is a thrilling novel that leads readers on a twisted path as they follow Theo’s spiral out of control.

 

When Theo hears the news that Donovan has returned home and isn’t speaking, she is shocked. When she realizes she knew Donovan’s accused kidnapper, she must come to terms with this discovery and decide what to do with her information. Theo considers her options, all while going to school, preparing for ballet auditions and getting involved in a relationship with the pianist at her ballet studio.

 

Throughout Pointe, Colbert deftly deals with many heavy issues, such as race, drugs and abuse, and does so in a way that keeps readers intrigued throughout the novel’s many twists and turns. Colbert has created a complex character in Theo, one who is far from perfect, but one readers will root for. Mature teen readers looking for a dark novel with intrigue will want to check out Brandy Colbert’s Pointe.
 

Laura

 
 

Love Knows No Boundaries

Love Knows No Boundaries

posted by:
June 17, 2014 - 6:00am

Cover art for The Geography of You and MeThe Geography of You and Me, the latest romance novel from teen author Jennifer E. Smith, is sure to capture the hearts of both teen and adult romance fans. The novel begins on a sweltering day in New York City when Lucy and Owen get trapped in an elevator in their apartment during a blackout. Lucy has lived in the apartment building with her jet-setting parents for years, and yet again finds herself alone as they travel the world. Owen, on the other hand, has just moved to the city because his dad took a job as the apartment building’s new superintendent. Though their paths have crossed before, it’s not until this fateful day that they truly meet.
 

After being rescued from the elevator, the two spend the night together talking about their lives. But when Lucy wakes up, Owen is gone. She looks for him for the next few days, but must quickly leave when her parents decide they want her to come visit them in London. After learning that her parents want the family to move away from New York, Lucy knows she has to find a way to contact Owen again. She decides on sending him a postcard, which he receives as she returns to New York to pack up the family apartment. Thus begins their long-distance relationship through a series of postcards, as she moves to London and Owen moves around the states with his father.
 

Readers are taken along on the journey of Lucy and Owen’s relationships — across continents, through scattered correspondence and the promise of the pair one day reuniting. Their relationship is hopeful and romantic.

Laura

 
 

First Impressions

First Impressions

posted by:
June 5, 2014 - 7:00am

Cover art for Bright Before SunriseJonah Prentiss may be the only person at Cross Pointe High School who does not like Brighton Waterford. Brighton is popular, smart, pretty and universally admired – that is until Jonah transfers to Cross Pointe for his senior year of high school. Bright Before Sunrise by Tiffany Schmidt alternates between the two points of view, telling the story of how they are thrown together over and over again during the course of one evening.

 

Jonah is angry that his mother and new stepfather forced him to move from Hamilton to live in the snooty neighboring town of Cross Pointe. He decides to avoid making friends at his new school and to spend as much time as possible in his old town with his friends and girlfriend. Brighton, on the other hand, pretends that her life is perfect, while underneath she is still mourning her father’s death. As a result, she throws herself into school and extracurricular activities to avoid dealing with her feelings. Brighton has made it her mission to befriend everyone, so when Jonah spurns her friendship, she is annoyed and determined to make him change his mind. Jonah comes home early after being dumped by his girlfriend to find Brighton in the house after she unknowingly offers to babysit his little sister. His parents then force him to drive Brighton home. As the night continues, the two end up both willingly and unwillingly in each other’s presence.

 

Bright Before Sunrise convincingly tells Brighton and Jonah’s stories from both perspectives. Readers come to understand the challenges both are facing, and why they behave the way they do. Meanwhile, the relationship that develops between the two teens will keep readers guessing until the very end. Fans of Jennifer Smith’s books will enjoy Tiffany Schmidt’s latest teen novel.
 

Laura

 
 

R-E-S-P-E-C-T

R-E-S-P-E-C-T

posted by:
May 15, 2014 - 7:00am

Cover art for Fat Boy vs. the CheerleadersMeet Gabe Johnson, more commonly known by his classmates as Chunk. He is an overweight trombone player in the marching band, a member of a dysfunctional household, a donut shop employee, a rebel and a criminal. He is also the hero of a wonderful new book titled Fat Boy vs. the Cheerleaders by Geoff Herbach. What begins with a study for health class, cataloging the use of the school soda machine, escalates into what becomes known as the Spunk River War. In a completely covert money grab, the proceeds from the machine originally used to fund the marching band are directed toward the creation of a new dance squad. The band finds out on the last day of school that there will be no summer band camp. With the help of social media, Chunk rallies the geeks to protest this injustice. The jocks become involved and stand up for their girlfriends, the burners join the geeks. The stage is set for an epic clash which is planned to take place during the town’s premier summer tourist event.

 

Though rife with group classifications and sweeping generalizations, this story is about so much more than the geeks challenging the popular crowd. It is about self-perception, personal pride and seeing beyond stereotypes. Gabe grows to become more than what people expect of him and is an inspirational character as a result.

 

This entertaining novel is told in the unique manner of a one-sided conversation. After Gabe is arrested for robbing the soda machine, he meets with his lawyer at the police station, and the novel is a transcript of this encounter. It’s a clever device which asks the reader to fill in the question as our protagonist provides the answer. Fat Boy vs. the Cheerleaders is an endearing coming of age novel. The value of friendship and the importance of self-worth combine to make this teen novel a real winner.

Jeanne

 
 

Best Friends Forever

Best Friends Forever

posted by:
April 2, 2014 - 7:00am

Maybe One DayMelissa Kantor’s Maybe One Day is a heartbreaking story that shows the importance of friendship, especially in the light of tragedy. Olivia and Zoe have been friends since they were young children and have trained at the elite New York Ballet Company since they were 9. When they are told that they can no longer train there during their sophomore year of high school, Zoe thinks that it’s the worst thing that could possibly happen to them. A year later, when she finds out Olivia is sick, she realizes how wrong she was.

 

When Olivia’s doctors discover that she has leukemia, the girls’ lives change forever. Olivia begins missing school, and Zoe must learn to make other friends and exist without her best friend constantly by her side. After Olivia’s diagnosis, Zoe agrees to start teaching her dance class at the local community center, despite having given up ballet after she left the New York Ballet Company. All the while she becomes closer with Calvin, the boy Olivia has always liked. Zoe must deal with the guilt she feels living her life, while Olivia is sick and unable to live hers.

 

Ultimately a book about best friends and the importance of friendship, Maybe One Day is a touching novel that fans of John Green’s The Fault in Our Stars will enjoy. Olivia and Zoe are relatable characters, their problems and dramas going beyond the cancer that comes to affect their friendship.

Laura

 
 

Good Girl Gone Bad

Good Girl Gone Bad

posted by:
February 25, 2014 - 7:00am

AfterpartyEmma has always been a good girl—her overprotective father has controlled her every waking moment since her mother overdosed when she was young. After her mother’s death, Emma and her dad moved all over Canada and the United States, never staying very long in one place. Upon arriving in Los Angeles at the start of Ann Redisch Stampler’s new teen novel, Afterparty, Emma quickly finds a new friend in Siobhan. As the two become closer, Emma the Good takes a back seat and Totally Bad Emma takes over.

 

When Emma starts at the snobby Latimer school she is immediately made fun of by her rich classmates for wearing vintage clothes and not being rich enough to have her own horse. Siobhan rescues her and the two become best friends, and suddenly the opinions of her classmates matter less to Emma, with the exception of Dylan, her new crush. Emma and Siobhan spend hours together drinking, shopping and partying. Siobhan even makes a list of wild things Emma must do in order to stop being Emma the Good. Meanwhile, Emma has to lie to her father at every turn, sneaking out of her window to go out with Siobhan at night. As she becomes less recognizable as Emma the Good, she realizes her friendship with Siobhan might not be as healthy as she once thought.

 

Afterparty is a book full of scandal, backstabbing and partying, perfect for older teens who are fans of Cecily von Ziegesar’s Gossip Girl series or Lauren Conrad’s L.A. Candy novels. Stampler has written a book full of drama that will keep readers interested until the very last page, determined to find out how bad Emma becomes.

Laura

 
 

Growing Up at a Young Age

Growing Up at a Young Age

posted by:
February 4, 2014 - 6:55am

Cover art for The Impossible Knife of MemoryThe Impossible Knife of Memory, Laurie Halse Anderson’s latest teen novel, tells the story of Hayley Kincain and her father. Hayley’s mother died when she was a baby, and ever since it’s just been Hayley and her dad. When Hayley’s father returns from war with severe post-traumatic stress disorder, her life gets turned upside down. In order to deal with the memories that haunt him, he becomes a truck driver, driving all over the country trying to outrun his memories. After years of homeschooling Hayley on the road, he decides they should move back to his hometown. Since they set out on the road years before, Hayley has had to be the responsible one, taking care of herself and her father. She hopes that moving home will mean that their life will settle down. Her father isn’t getting better at home either. He continues to self-medicate his PTSD with drugs and alcohol, forcing Hayley to run the house and keep her teachers and friends from noticing.

 

At school, Hayley struggles to deal with her zombie-like classmates and teachers who don’t accept her unorthodox education. Her only friend is Gracie, a friend from elementary school who barely remembers her. Finn, another classmate, has made it his mission to get Hayley to write for the school newspaper in order to become closer to her. As she begins to fall for Finn, her father takes a turn for the worse and her life falls to pieces.

 

Much like Anderson’s earlier novel Speak, The Impossible Knife of Memory deals with many heavy themes. Hayley’s distinct voice and vibrant personality make her a character readers will identify with and remember long after they finish the book.
 

Laura

 
 

Gray Skies

Gray Skies

posted by:
January 30, 2014 - 9:19am

When you are harboring a sinister secret, who better to hear the confession than a convicted murderer on death row? In Annabel Pitcher’s new teen novel, Ketchup Clouds, that’s what British teenager Zoe is doing as a cathartic way of telling what happened when she became romantically involved with two brothers and ultimately was responsible for the death of one of them.

 

To sort out her thoughts and feelings, Zoe begins writing to Mr. Stuart Harris, who killed his wife in a jealous rage and is awaiting execution in Texas. Through a series of letters, Zoe (which is not her real name) chronicles her seemingly typical teen drama of the previous year. There was rising tension at her home, due in part to her father’s unemployment and her mother’s control issues. At a party, she met an amazingly unique guy, Aaron. What she didn’t realize until later was that Aaron was Max’s older brother – Max being the guy she is semi-enthusiastically dating. As the story progresses, her true feelings about Aaron and Max and the series of events leading to Max’s death come to light, as do some missing pieces of her family’s history. Suspense builds as Stuart’s looming execution date coincides with the anniversary of Max’s death.

 

Pitcher’s first novel, My Sister Lives on the Mantelpiece, was highly acclaimed for its down-to-earth approach to a unique premise, and in Ketchup Clouds she likewise employs engaging, candid writing to solve a compelling mystery: Why does Zoe feel she’s to blame for Max’s death? A refreshingly honest character with a unique outlook on the world, Zoe will resonate with teen and adult readers as someone struggling toward resolution after long internalizing her fear and guilt.

Melanie