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Cat Cavalcade

Cat Cavalcade

posted by:
October 17, 2013 - 7:00am

Hello Kitty: Here We Go! cover artMr. Wuffles! cover artTwo very different cats play lead roles in new largely wordless books for young readers. International feline superstar Hello Kitty makes her graphic novel debut in Hello Kitty: Here We Go! by Jacob Chabot. After a quick introduction to her friends and family, HK’s global adventures begin. Making her way through locations real and imaginary, the jet-setting cat finds new friends, exciting places to explore and strange new creatures to assist her along her path. Each short vignette features Hello Kitty charming her way to adventure, fun and happiness.

 

Multiple Caldecott-winning author/illustrator David Wiesner’s new picture book centers on a tuxedo cat with the completely opposite mood from Hello Kitty. The amusingly misnamed black-and-white feline Mr. Wuffles! is a curmudgeonly creature with no interest in the toys that his owner brings him. Until suddenly, a new toy appears in Mr. Wuffles’ world – that of a small spaceship commanded by a group of tiny green aliens. Wiesner’s ability to realistically illustrate the movements of a lazy cat who suddenly becomes interested in the visitors is remarkable. The aliens’ ship is in need of repair after being batted around and chomped by Mr. Wuffles. They receive aid from an unexpected group of under-the-radiator insects who have also been terrified by the cat. Ant, ladybug and alien “speak” to each other through art to assist each in mystifying their feline tormentor and concocting an escape for the otherworldly creatures. In this short video, David Wiesner introduces Mr. Wuffles! and his artistic process.

 

Lovable each in their own way, these two furry, whiskered cats bring their adventures in paneled, graphic novel format, introducing young readers to visual literacy and expanding their imaginations.

Todd

 
 

Imagination Run Wild

Imagination Run Wild

posted by:
October 15, 2013 - 7:00am

The Sasquatch EscapeThe Lonely Lake MonsterWhere would you take an injured baby dragon? To the imaginary veterinary if you are lucky enough to have one in town. The Sasquatch Escape is the first book in the Imaginary Veterinary series by Suzanne Selfors. In it, two 10-year-olds, Ben and Pearl, find themselves living in what could be the most boring town in the world, Buttonville. The Button factory has long been closed down when Ben moves in with his grandfather while his parents work out some “issues.”  Pearl has lived there her whole life and is well-known as a troublemaker…so much so that she has been banned from the bookstore and other children are not allowed to play with her! When Ben’s cat catches a baby dragon, Ben and Pearl take the dragon to the only animal doctor in town, Dr. Woo of Dr. Woo’s Worm Hospital, located inside the old button factory. All is not as it seems at the Worm Hospital, as the children discover when a Sasquatch is let loose on the town!   

 

Book two in the series, The Lonely Lake Monster, continues Ben and Pearl’s adventures as apprentices at the Worm Hospital. Tasked with trimming the Sasquatch’s toenails on the first day, they quickly become distracted by an enormous lake monster and a leprechaun with a head cold. When the lonely lake monster catches Ben for a pet, it is up to Pearl to save him (ideally without being caught breaking the rules, again!)

 

The Imaginary Veterinary series is filled with delightful characters from both the real world and the imaginary world. Underlying themes of loyalty and resilience add to the rich plotline. Selfors alternates points of view for each book, with book one being told from Ben’s point of view, and book two being told from Pearl’s. She adds some enrichment activities to the end of each book challenging the reader to use their imaginations with some writing, art and science activities.  She also adds some background to the mythical creatures described in each book.  This is an excellent adventure series for children who enjoy a little bit of fantasy. The third book, The Rain Dragon Rescue, is due out in January 2014.

Diane

 
 

A Funny Thing Happened…

Fortunately, The MilkIn Neil Gaiman’s latest children’s book, Fortunately, The Milk, a father goes through an incredible series of side adventures as he tries to return home with a bottle of milk from the local store. In fact, it seems as if this hapless man encounters every sort of being from children’s literature: aliens, dinosaurs, pirates, vampires (which Gaiman calls ‘wumpires’), ponies and human-sacrificing islanders. After the father is late coming home with milk for his children’s cereal, he relates a tale that is both fantastic and silly about travelling through time with a very intelligent Stegosaurus. Naturally, his children don’t believe a word he says, but a twist at the end makes them wonder if there was any truth in his alibi.

   

Gaiman, whose past books include Coraline and The Graveyard Book, shares a story that could easily be turned into a Tim Burton film. Burton and Gaiman have collaborated in the past and it feels as if this book was written with a movie deal in mind. The pen and ink illustrations by Skottie Young add to the humor and give a definite comic book flavor to the tale. For youngsters who enjoy a fast-paced read with plenty of pictures, Fortunately, The Milk delivers in barely more than 100 pages.  

Regina

 
 

Halloween Heart Warmers

Fly Guy and the FrankenflyA Very Witchy Spelling BeeTwo new books are designed for young readers and on the shelf just in time for Halloween. With Frankenflies and witches these books seem made for this time of year, but are designed to celebrate the season without too much of a scare.  

 

Tedd Arnold is the author of the bestselling series Fly Guy. Fly Guy and the Frankenfly is his spooky new installment. This book is a beginning reader with short manageable chapters for those young readers who are starting to read on their own.

 

After a night of crafting monster costumes, Buzz is lying in bed and before he drifts off to sleep he sees Fly Guy working away at the desk. As Buzz falls asleep he begins to dream that Fly Guy is Dr. Frankenstein in fly form and creates a Frankenfly. This Frankenfly is huge and Buzz is understandably frightened. Pick up this installment of Fly Guy to see how Buzz handles Frankenfly.
 

A Very Witchy Spelling Bee is written by George Shannon and illustrated by Mark Fearing. This picture book follows Cordelia, a young witch with a penchant for spelling. Not only does she spell words, but with the flick of her wrist and the addition of a letter she can turn a cow into a crow. She does these spells to pass the time, so when the Witches’ Double Spelling Bee is advertised, Cordelia can’t contain her excitement.

 

Cordelia feels she has been practicing for this very thing for her whole life. What she doesn’t know is that the long running champ Beulah Divine is a fiend who will stop at nothing to win. Beulah is even looking forward to winning against a child. How will Cordelia handle the pressures of competing with someone who is not only ruthless, but much older and more experienced as well?

 

This picture book is a combination of entertainment and education. The plot mixed with adorable illustrations create an entertaining story, and the subject of the book allows for the opportunity to practice spelling with your young reader.

Randalee

 
 

Page-Turners to Share

Page-Turners to Share

posted by:
October 11, 2013 - 7:00am

Nighty Night, Little Green MonsterThe Spooky BoxTwo new Halloween books are sure to capture the imagination of the youngest readers. Nighty Night, Little Green Monster by Ed Emberley is the perfect bedtime book for the season. A colorful young monster’s features are described with simple adjectives as each turn of the die-cut page builds his face. Once the reader sees this silly rather than scary character, the refrain “nighty night” repeats as page-turning slowly makes him disappear. Emerging readers will enjoy paging through the book on their own as the visual clues help tell the story. Go Away, Big Green Monster, now a modern childhood classic, was published by the same Caldecott-winning author/illustrator in 1992.

 

Whatever could be inside graphic designer/author Mark Gonyea’s The Spooky Box? The narrator speculates that the simply depicted black box could be filled with any number of creepy things, from bats to rats to spiders. Each page is more visually exciting than the last, as Gonyea skillfully builds suspense. Breaking down the fourth wall, he orders the reader to open the box to reveal its contents. Noises are now coming from within, and the speculation continues. This is a book that children and adults will enjoy equally; its surprise ending provides an opportunity for plenty of what-if discussions that will last long after the book is over. Gonyea dedicates his striking orange and black picture book to “everyone who loves thinking of endless possibilities.”

Paula G.

 
 

From The Hunger Games to Picture Book

Year of the JungleThe bestselling author that brought you The Hunger Games series is showing her versatility with Year of the Jungle, a picture book about Suzanne Collins as a little girl whose dad serves in the Vietnam War. Collins collaborates with illustrator James Proimos to bring this touching picture book to young readers.

 

This book follows young Suzy as she sees her dad off to Vietnam without truly understanding the ramifications of his going away. While he is gone she looks forward to his postcards and feels the loss more deeply than she is able to express. Days go by and turn into months as holidays and seasons pass without her father. She can’t understand the concept of a year and has to just keep waiting for his return with no idea as to how long she will have to wait.

 

Collins seeks to capture the impact that serving in the military can have on the children of those brave soldiers. She reached back to remember how she felt as a 6-year-old coping with the loss of her father. Collins talks in this short video about her experience writing Year of the Jungle. This picture book is honest and heartfelt, though not too graphic or intense for young readers, especially if they have a loved one serving in the military.

Randalee

 
 

The Page Runners

The Page Runners

posted by:
October 2, 2013 - 7:00am

House of SecretsNoted film director (Home Alone, Harry Potter) Chris Columbus and Ned Vizzini serve up an action-packed adventure in House of Secrets. The Walker children, Cordelia, Brendan and Eleanor, have enjoyed a privileged childhood, but following an “incident” at the hospital where their father worked, the family has fallen on challenging times. Forced to relocate to San Francisco, the family happens upon a house that seems too good to be true. A grand old Victorian once owned by a famous author, the Kristoff House is offered at a fraction of its value. Enchanted, the Walkers quickly take up residence – but not for long.

 

The day of the move, a mysterious neighbor visits the household. Dahlia, the daughter of author Denver Kristoff, the original owner, seems friendly and harmless enough, but her exterior conceals the truly villainous nature of the Wind Witch. Soon enough, she has separated the children from their parents and cast them into the fantastical worlds of Kristoff’s books.

 

Left to fend for themselves in the mysterious realms of Kristoff’s fiction, Cordelia, Brendan and Eleanor must band together to make sense of their banishment and find a way to defeat the Wind Witch who has trapped them within the pages of her father’s works. Along the way, the children are alternately helped, hindered and betrayed by the characters they encounter.

 

This is a decidedly action-driven story and the precocious Walker children seldom experience a dull moment from the first time they lay eyes on the mysterious Kristoff House. Readers will find themselves similarly swept along for the ride. Though the cultural references in the dialogue may date the story before its time, today's kids will particularly enjoy the number of mentions of current popular media and electronic devices. 

Recommended for upper middle grade or young adult readers for somewhat mature content, House of Secrets will hold particular appeal for fans of Cornelia Funke’s Inkheart series and Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events.

Meghan

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The Sweet Smell of Victory

Cover art for Danny's DoodlesDanny Cohen is in the fourth grade, follows the rules and enjoys playing baseball. Calvin Waffle is the new kid in class, having recently moved with his mother into a house on Danny’s block. Calvin likes science experiments and seeing how far he can bend the rules without getting caught. It’s one of Calvin’s experiments that starts an unlikely friendship in Danny’s Doodles: The Jelly Bean Experiment by David A. Adler.

 

For a whole week, Calvin follows Danny everywhere, constantly writing his observations in a notebook. On the second week, Calvin asks Danny to hold jelly beans in his pocket. It seems like a strange request, but Danny agrees and the Jelly Bean Experiment is underway.  What will Calvin learn from his experiment and how will Calvin’s powers of observation help Danny’s team win the upcoming baseball game?

   

This is a first in a new series by Adler, the author of the much loved Cam Jansen series. Child-like doodles are found throughout the book as if drawn by Danny. A funny story about friendship and acceptance, Danny’s Doodles is perfect for readers transitioning into chapter books.

Christina

 
 

Color Your World

Color Your World

posted by:
September 25, 2013 - 7:55am

Cover art for My Blue Is HappyCover art for Henri's ScissorsColors arouse emotions, but the feelings evoked are as unique as each person. Jessica Young tackles this concept in My Blue Is Happy. Readers follow one girl as she explores with family and friends and shares her original ideas about colors. Her best friend likes pink because it’s pretty, but our protagonist finds it annoying, like a piece of gum stuck to your shoe or a bug bite. Chocolate is ordinary says her dad, but this little girl thinks it’s special like chocolate syrup. The girl travels through her world in nine colors, concisely expressing her ideas about each. Illustrator Catia Chen’s vibrant acrylic illustrations capture all the personalities of the colors. Sure gray can be cold like a rainstorm, but if you’re cuddling with grandma on a cozy chair it’s warm and fuzzy. Young deftly explores the idea of contrasts and encourages readers to carefully consider the different feelings colors suggest.

 

In Henri’s Scissors, written and illustrated by Jeanette Winter, color is the star, helping an aging artist reinvent his creative self. Winter covers Mattise’s early years and journey toward becoming an artist, but her focus here is on the last years of his life, following an illness that left him unable to paint. When faced without a creative outlet, Matisse was overjoyed when he picked up a pair of scissors and started cutting colored paper. He transformed his sick room into a secret fantasy garden filled with vibrant flowers and showy birds. The illustrations, acrylic and cut-paper, are simple, yet perfectly depict the joy Matisse felt while amidst some of his finest works. This is a tender homage to a man whose legacy is such everlasting beauty.
 

Maureen

 
 

The Sweetness at the Bottom of Pi in the Sky

Cover art for Pi in the SkyFrom the author of Every Soul a Star comes a story that’s out of this world — literally! In Pi in the Sky, Wendy Mass weaves an imaginative tale of worlds colliding, and the rollercoaster adventure that results.
 

Joss is a seventh son. Not just any seventh son, but the seventh son of the Supreme Overlord of the Universe. Expecting a superhero, imbued with extraordinary powers and responsibilities? Guess again. Despite what you may have heard, being that special “seventh son” does not imbue you with any great powers or great responsibilities — even if your dad is the SOU. With six older brothers, the greatest responsibility Joss has ever held is delivering pies across The Realms to the Powers That Be.
 

That’s right; a glorified pie delivery boy.
 

Mind you, these aren’t ordinary pies, but more about that later...
 

To date, Joss’ life has revolved around going to school (even immortals need an education), hanging out with his best friend Kal and getting those pies delivered on time. Then one day, a girl from Earth winds up in The Realms after her planet has been obliterated and Joss’ whole world is thrown out of orbit. Upgraded from delivery boy to world architect, it’s up to Joss to somehow rebuild Earth with the help of the planet’s last human, Annika.
 

Pi in the Sky is a spirited fantasy of friendship, adventure and the awesome sciences that shape our world. It is a balanced story that is accessible and fun to read even as it incorporates some challenging concepts. The characters are relatable and the story is alternately playful and poignant. Chapters are headed by quotes from scientists and visionaries that succinctly capture the theme of the chapter to follow. Recommended for middle grade readers and, in particular, fans of Madeleine L’Engle’s A Swiftly Tilting Planet.

Meghan