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Road Trip Reads

Road Trip Reads

posted by:
May 30, 2012 - 5:11am

At the BoardwalkDini DinosaurBaby Come AwayTake these three new titles with you on your next family trip! Enjoy your vacation and keep everyone occupied with these colorful picture books all in rhyme.

 

Salt water, sand, games, rides, and summer treats--what could be better than a day at the beach? Kids and families will look through At the Boardwalk by Kelly Ramsdell again and again. A snapshot of a summer’s day on the boards, these lively, colorful, and very detailed cartoon-style pencil drawings, by illustrator Monica Armino, depict a myriad of memories and familiar, happy scenes, with different people of all ages. Simply worded in a rhyming style, you can almost hear the carousel and taste the cotton candy!

 

Dini Dinosaur, by Karen Beaumont and illustrated by Daniel Roode, is the perfect companion for downtime or a rainy day, and makes bath time and bedtime for toddlers much more fun! After a long day of play, Dini needs a little help with his bath and washing behind his horns. Playful, rhyming repetition will delight kids as little Dini starts his bath will all his dirty clothes on and finally ends up in the dinosaur buff, all squeaky clean. Bright, graphic illustrations show Dini after a whole day of messy play, and after coming clean, give him a sweet, sleepy send-off to little dinosaur dreams.

 

A bird, a cat, a fish, and a dog each imagine their perfect day with baby in Baby, Come Away, by Victoria Adler. Baby and his friends share a cup of tea in a tip-top tree, a sneak to the creek with pitter-patter feet, a romp and a roll in a puddle-filled hole, and more, until bed time comes with a kiss good night and baby can dream, dream, dream to his heart’s delight. Gentle, pastel illustrations by David Walker show adorable images of a fanciful day of play, and the sweet rhymes are a happy way to lull baby off to sleep.

Andrea

 
 

Happy 20th Anniversary, Junie B. Jones!

Junie B. Jones and the Stupid Smelly BusJunie B. First Grader: Turkeys We Have Loved and EatenTwenty years ago, Random House approached 3 of their established authors to begin a new line of books for new readers who were just starting to read chapter books.  Those authors were Barbara Park, Mary Pope Osborne, and Louis Sachar. The series that the authors created were Junie B. Jones, The Magic Tree House, and Marvin Redpost, all of which are now standards for young readers and have sold millions of copies. 

 

In the beginning, Park had reservations about writing for 6-9 year olds, but she decided to give it a shot and began work on the Junie B. Jones series. Park says, “Within the first four sentences, I discovered I had a character who hated her middle name. By the second page, I knew she was a wild child, who – big surprise – had not yet mastered the Queen’s English. And when I finally finished the book, I thought maybe I could write one or two more. I was a little low with my expectations, apparently.” Her expectations were definitely too low. There are now 29 books in the Junie B. Jones series, and more than 52 million copies in print! 

 

To celebrate 20 years of Junie B. Jones, Random House has published a special edition of the first novel in the series, Junie B. Jones and the Stupid Smelly Bus. This commemorative edition has some great extras including full-color illustrations and an interview of the author conducted by none other than Junie B. Also, look for Junie B.’s next big adventure Junie B., First Grader: Turkeys We Have Loved and Eaten (and Other Thankful Stuff), a Thanksgiving-themed book due out this August!

Beth

 
 

Nancy on the Case

Nancy on the Case

posted by:
May 23, 2012 - 1:11am

Nancy Clancy, Super SleuthThe Cape Mermaid MysteryThere’s a new girl detective in town. As readers know from Jane O’Connor’s Fancy Nancy picture book series, Nancy Clancy likes to live her life just a little bit fancier than most other people. She is now also the star of her first chapter book for young readers!  In Nancy Clancy, Super Sleuth, Nancy is taking on a new challenge and becoming a sleuth, which she explains is a fancy word for detective.  To get into her detective persona, she dons a pink trench coat and carries a magnifying glass with rhinestones on it.  She and her best friend Bree are looking for a mystery to solve.  They find one at her school when her teacher's special blue marble goes missing. Can Nancy and Bree solve the mystery, and return Mr. D's favorite memento?

 

Nancy Clancy is inspired by another super sleuth--Nancy Drew. If the traditional Nancy Drew mysteries are still a little too challenging for your young reader, the Nancy Drew and the Clue Crew series is a great starting point. These short chapter books feature eight-year-old Nancy Drew who forms a club to solve mysteries with her friends in River Heights.  The newest release in the series is The Cape Mermaid Mystery. Nancy Drew and her friends go on a vacation to Cape Mermaid, New Jersey. After they hear spooky noises and there’s a possible ghost sighting at the old inn on the beach, they begin to wonder if it’s the rumored ghost of Cape Mermaid. This is a job for the Clue Crew!

Beth

 
 

A World Without the Super Soaker®?

What Color is my World?There’s more to former NBA star Kareem Abdul-Jabbar than just basketball. In What Color is My World?: the Lost History of African-American Inventors, he and co-author Raymond Obstfeld tackle the book's subject and make it interesting for kids!

 

Twin siblings Ella and Herbie are less than thrilled about their new fixer-upper of a house.  Eccentric handyman Mr. R.E. Mital comes to work on the house and slowly shares with the two the potential of their new home. He also uses different things in the house as a starting point to share contributions made by African-American inventors. Turning on a light bulb prompts a discussion about Lewis Latimer, while working in the kitchen brings up George Crum and his marvelous invention of the potato chip.

 

Flaps show lifelike portraits of individuals like Dr. Mark Dean, a vice-president at IBM, Dr. Charles Drew, who developed the concept of blood banks, and of great importance to children everywhere, nuclear engineer Lonnie Johnson, inventor of the Super Soaker® squirt gun! Ella’s notes appear inside the flaps, while several spreads provide detailed profiles of other inventors and graphic novel-style passages. This surprising and informative exploration of unfamiliar inventors is also fun thanks in part to the realistic banter between the siblings.

 

This is a fun easy read that can be read cover to cover, but the book's layout also makes it an ideal choice for skipping around and reading about those of most interest – like Alfred Cralle, inventor of the indispensable ice cream scoop! A list of books, websites, and videos is included at the end for those who want to keep on learning. And like Ella and Herbie, the reader uncovers a surprise discovery about Mr. Mital’s real identity.

Maureen

 
 

Eight-Year-Old Seeks Adventure, Finds Friendship

Iva Honeysuckle Discovers the WorldIn Iva Honeysuckle Discovers the World, eight-year-old Iva Honeycutt has a thirst for adventure. Her summer plan is to make her first big discovery and earn membership into the National Geographic Society. First she has to ditch her girly-girl double cousin, Heaven. Iva’s mother and Heaven’s mother are sisters. They married brothers and planned their families so their children would grow up as best friends. This is great for Iva’s older and younger sisters, who were paired with cousins they liked. Iva is stuck with bossy Heaven, who lives next door and tattles on her constantly. 

 

Iva sets out to find the lost treasure of General Braddock. She finds a treasure map from her great-grandfather Ludwell, changes her name to Iva Honeysuckle and embarks on the adventure of a lifetime. Unfortunately, Heaven gets her cousin signed up for Vacation Church School, where Iva earns the distinction of being the first child ever expelled. Will her summer improve? Will Iva join the National Geographic Society? Enjoy finding out the answers in this quirky, fun read by Candice Ransom. The author peppers her story with eccentric characters like Mr. and Mrs. Prindy, who had a falling out thirty-five years ago and have only spoke through third parties ever since. Euple Free is patiently covering his truck in used tinfoil, and Swannanoah Prindy spends her time picking through the trash to offer up as treasures to others.

 

Iva Honeysuckle Discovers the World is a light, funny read for the elementary school crowd. Young readers will enjoy the adventure and the freedom Iva has as she sets out to make her mark on the world.  Ransom’s original storytelling is engaging and fun. Illustrations by Heather Ross add to the charm of the story. This one is perfect for summer reading.

Diane

 
 

A First Look at Nature’s Heroes

Life in the OceanRachel Carson and Her Book that Changed the WorldFor the BirdsThree of the most famous naturalists of the past one hundred years get their due in introductory, illustrated biographies for young readers. Each extraordinary life shares a common thread--following a strong interest in the natural world as a child and developing it into a career that changed the way Americans interact with their environment.

 

In Life in the Ocean: the Story of Oceanographer Sylvia Earle, the sea and all of its hidden plants and animals are brilliantly portrayed by author and illustrator Claire Nivola. From the New Jersey farm she lived on until age twelve, to the seaside in Florida where she spent her adolescence, these surroundings shaped Sylvia Earle’s life and her curiosity about the natural world. Diving into the depths and encountering whales and amazing bioluminescent fishes, her ongoing exploration of the ocean and fight to keep it clean and preserve its treasures has made Earle a pioneer for female marine biologists.

 

Rachel Carson is well-known worldwide for her seminal critique of pesticides and the chemical industry, Silent Spring, as well as other important works. Rachel Carson and her Book that Changed the World is a good introduction to her life and accomplishments. Showing an early interest in nature throughout her childhood, she found her niche after taking a biology course in college.  Laurie Lawlor covers both Carson’s triumphs and difficulties in this tightly-written biography.

 

Though known in his neighborhood for his unusual habits as a child, Roger Tory Peterson is now noticed for what he noticed--the incredible world of birds. His curiosity and lifelong passion to educate the masses and conserve the habitats our feathered friends is the subject of For the Birds: the Life of Roger Tory Peterson. Peterson, best known for his many field guides to bird identification and behavior, is described vividly by Peggy Thomas, and the illustrations by Laura Jacques are striking. Of particular note is a double-page spread of a flicker just taking flight.

 

Budding environmentalists can learn about three of the most famous names in natural science with these timely picture book biographies.

Todd

 
 

The Pioneer Woman Does It All

Pioneer Woman Cooks: Food From My FrontierCharlie the Ranch DogBlack Heels to Tractor Wheels

Ree Drummond is a successful blogger, Food Network star, and author.  Her down-home comfort foods have really struck a chord with readers and cooks from all walks of life. Drummond’s success began with her blog The Pioneer Woman, which has a legion of followers, receiving 24 million hits monthly.  The blog covers her family life on an Oklahoma cattle ranch, her efforts to homeschool her children, and of course, cooking.  The recipes are delicious and easy to follow, and readers love that Drummond illustrates them with step-by-step photos.

 

It seemed like a natural transition for Drummond to publish cookbooks.  Her most recent, The Pioneer Woman Cooks: Food from My Frontier, is filled with tasty recipes color photos, and Drummond’s anecdotes and comments.  You’ll want to try the recipes for yourself when you see her homemade glazed doughnuts, cowgirl quiche, and “Knock You Naked” brownies!  The book quickly became a bestseller, and there are now more than 480,000 copies in print.

Drummond recently started filming the second season of her Food Network show “The Pioneer Woman”.  Like her blog, the show features her life on the ranch, her family, and her favorite recipes.  Viewers will also be interested to know that she has published a picture book called Charlie the Ranch Dog that features her family’s beloved basset hound.

 

It’s not all about the recipes, though.  To learn more about Drummond’s life, try her memoir Black Heels to Tractor Wheels: A Love Story, which tells the story of how she met her husband Ladd Drummond who she affectionately calls Marlboro Man in the book and her blog.  Ree originally planned to go on to law school, but everything changed when she met Ladd.  She shocked her family by marrying him and moving to the ranch. The rest, as they say, is history.

Beth

 
 

Horten Finds a Clue

Horten Finds a Clue

posted by:
May 16, 2012 - 1:11am

Horten's Miraculous MechanismsSummer is off to a doleful start for 10-year old Stuart Horten. Stuart is the pint-sized son of exceptionally tall, exceptionally brilliant parents (his mother is a doctor and his father is a crossword puzzle constructionist). Clever as they may be, Stuart’s parents aren’t always the most sensible sort of people. This can surely be the only explanation for why they’ve chosen to uproot young Stuart just at the start of summer vacation, to move to nobody-knows-where Beeton. With the start of the school year and any reasonable opportunity of meeting kids his own age a far removed prospect, Stuart prepares to settle in for a very long, exceptionally dull summer.

 

Beeton does have one claim to familial fame and Stuart’s interest. It was here that his great-uncle Tony developed a dazzling career in magic, before mysteriously disappearing fifty years ago. However, those magical days are long gone; the mystery of Uncle Tony’s disappearance unsolved and mostly forgotten. Until this summer, that is.

 

Stuart resigns himself to exile in Beeton. However, he wasn't prepared for the meddling triplet girls next door, or the seriously spooky encounter with an out-of-order telephone booth. With one mystifying phone call, Stuart is set on a path of puzzles and clues, designed by his great-uncle Tony to lead the “right sort of boy” to an altogether splendid secret workshop filled with marvelous – perhaps even miraculous – mechanisms. With clues afoot, newfound friends at his back, and even a hint of danger in the air, Stuart’s summer is swiftly turning into the adventure of a lifetime.

 

Horten's Miraculous Mechanisms is perfect for children ages 9-12 and in particular for children who enjoy elements of mystery and puzzles in stories. Parents will also appreciate the expansive introduction to vocabulary provided by the dialogue of Stuart’s crossword clue-dropping father. Additional recommendations for those who have enjoyed this story include The 39 Clues series (various authors) as well as the Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events.

Meghan

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The Bee's Knees

UnBEElievablesThe Honeybee ManBackyard beekeeping continues to rise in popularity and two recent children’s titles spotlight these buzzy critters and their importance to our world.  In UnBEElievables by Douglas Florian, this award-winning poet of the natural world offers 14 lively poems.  The subjects of his verses range from bee anatomy, to the different types of bees, to the collapse of bee colonies in recent years.  He uses his trademark wordplay and puns, but also manages to sneak some information into the poems as well.  A paragraph offering further explanation follows each verse and the illustrations bring the words to life. Working in gouache, colored pencils, and collage on paper bags, Florian captures the essence of the world of bees. This is a fun and visually appealing book that comes complete with a BEEbliography.

     

In her children’s debut, Lela Nargi shares the story of Fred from Brooklyn in The Honeybee Man. Every morning, Fred climbs to his rooftop and greets his beloved bees, “Good morning, my bees, my darlings!" His honeybees travel across Brooklyn searching for flowers all day and return with nectar to store in their wax rooms.  At the right time, Fred makes honey which the entire neighborhood enjoys. This beautifully written story accompanied by Kyrsten Brooker's collage-style illustrations offers an inside look at the life of a sweet beekeeper and the honey-making process.  An afterword of "amazing facts" explains more about apiarists, bees' life cycles, and more.  Even the endpapers provide a learning opportunity with labeled diagrams of bees and beekeeping materials. This is an unusual glimpse of beekeeping in an urban setting inspired by two neighbors in Nargi’s New York community.  

Maureen

 
 

Jean Craighead George, 1919-2012

Julie of the WolvesMy Side of the MountainPopular children's book author Jean Craighead George has died at the age of 92. A long-time resident of the Washington DC area, she was best known for her naturalistic writing for children. George won the Newbery Medal in 1972 for the Julie of the Wolves, and was also well-known for My Side of the Mountain, among countless other works.

Todd