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Librarians

Are You Afraid of the Dark?

Cover art for Yeti, Turn Our the Light!Who could be afraid of some cute little bunnies, birdies and a deer? Well, when they are making strange noises and shadows at night they could frighten anyone, even a big furry Yeti. Authors Greg Long and Chris Edmundson and illustrator Wednesday Kirwan creatively address the common childhood issue of being afraid of the dark in Yeti, Turn Out the Light! As the day comes to an end, Yeti returns home from the forest and gets ready for bed. He gets cozy under the covers and turns out the lights. Even though Yeti is tired, he can’t seem to fall asleep because of the frightening shadows in his room. Is it a monster coming to get him? No! It’s just some of his woodland friends who have joined him for an impromptu sleepover.  Bright illustrations and rhyming text make this an excellent book to share with your little one.
 

To further help your child explore their fear of the dark at bedtime, try Let’s Sing a Lullaby with the Brave Cowboy by Jan Thomas. Using bright, cartoon-like illustrations, Thomas shows how a brave cowboy’s imagination gets the best of him as he tries to sing the cows to sleep. Children may also like I Want My Light On!: A Little Princess Story by Tony Ross. When the little princess goes to bed, she insists that the light be left on because she believes there are ghosts in the dark. As it turns out, little ghosts are just as afraid of the dark.
 

Christina

 
 

In the Spirit of Spook

Cover art for ZombelinaCover art for Vampirina BallerinaZombies and vampires have been all the rage lately, but not like this. Zombies who eat brains? Okay, sure. Vampires who suck blood? Makes sense. But vampires and zombies in tutus? Huh? Authors Kristyn Crow and Anne Marie Pace bring to life two adorably spooky characters with wonderfully supportive families.

 

Zombelina has a love of dance that she just can’t contain. She twirls through the house from one dance to the next. To her pleasant surprise, her mother says it’s time that she becomes a true ballerina. She takes her shopping for all of the ballet accoutrement and even signs her up for lessons. When she begins her class, it’s plain to see that Zombelina may be a little different from the other girls, but she practices hard and gains praise for her unique spin on ballet. Will the practice pay off for her big recital? Crow uses rhyming in combination with Molly Idle’s illustrations to create a story wholly unique. This book is a clear choice for any young reader with a passion for dance or who is looking for something to get them in spooky spirits.

 

Another book to go with the theme is Anne Marie Pace’s second installment of Vampirina Ballerina, titled Vampirina Ballerina Hosts a Sleepover. In this story, Vampirina shows just what to do to create the very best sleepover. It’s not all about work, though, as the little girls come over and frolic in this uncharacteristic house filled with mummies, monsters and spiders, oh my. Not everyone enjoys the slumber party when one little girl is spooked by an unexpected mummy appearance. Will Vampirina be able to save the party she worked so hard to plan?

 

Other picture books to celebrate the spooky season are Bone Soup by Cambria Evans and Gibbus Moony Wants to Bite You! by Leslie Muir.

Randalee

 
 

Cat Cavalcade

Cat Cavalcade

posted by:
October 17, 2013 - 7:00am

Hello Kitty: Here We Go! cover artMr. Wuffles! cover artTwo very different cats play lead roles in new largely wordless books for young readers. International feline superstar Hello Kitty makes her graphic novel debut in Hello Kitty: Here We Go! by Jacob Chabot. After a quick introduction to her friends and family, HK’s global adventures begin. Making her way through locations real and imaginary, the jet-setting cat finds new friends, exciting places to explore and strange new creatures to assist her along her path. Each short vignette features Hello Kitty charming her way to adventure, fun and happiness.

 

Multiple Caldecott-winning author/illustrator David Wiesner’s new picture book centers on a tuxedo cat with the completely opposite mood from Hello Kitty. The amusingly misnamed black-and-white feline Mr. Wuffles! is a curmudgeonly creature with no interest in the toys that his owner brings him. Until suddenly, a new toy appears in Mr. Wuffles’ world – that of a small spaceship commanded by a group of tiny green aliens. Wiesner’s ability to realistically illustrate the movements of a lazy cat who suddenly becomes interested in the visitors is remarkable. The aliens’ ship is in need of repair after being batted around and chomped by Mr. Wuffles. They receive aid from an unexpected group of under-the-radiator insects who have also been terrified by the cat. Ant, ladybug and alien “speak” to each other through art to assist each in mystifying their feline tormentor and concocting an escape for the otherworldly creatures. In this short video, David Wiesner introduces Mr. Wuffles! and his artistic process.

 

Lovable each in their own way, these two furry, whiskered cats bring their adventures in paneled, graphic novel format, introducing young readers to visual literacy and expanding their imaginations.

Todd

 
 

Halloween Heart Warmers

Fly Guy and the FrankenflyA Very Witchy Spelling BeeTwo new books are designed for young readers and on the shelf just in time for Halloween. With Frankenflies and witches these books seem made for this time of year, but are designed to celebrate the season without too much of a scare.  

 

Tedd Arnold is the author of the bestselling series Fly Guy. Fly Guy and the Frankenfly is his spooky new installment. This book is a beginning reader with short manageable chapters for those young readers who are starting to read on their own.

 

After a night of crafting monster costumes, Buzz is lying in bed and before he drifts off to sleep he sees Fly Guy working away at the desk. As Buzz falls asleep he begins to dream that Fly Guy is Dr. Frankenstein in fly form and creates a Frankenfly. This Frankenfly is huge and Buzz is understandably frightened. Pick up this installment of Fly Guy to see how Buzz handles Frankenfly.
 

A Very Witchy Spelling Bee is written by George Shannon and illustrated by Mark Fearing. This picture book follows Cordelia, a young witch with a penchant for spelling. Not only does she spell words, but with the flick of her wrist and the addition of a letter she can turn a cow into a crow. She does these spells to pass the time, so when the Witches’ Double Spelling Bee is advertised, Cordelia can’t contain her excitement.

 

Cordelia feels she has been practicing for this very thing for her whole life. What she doesn’t know is that the long running champ Beulah Divine is a fiend who will stop at nothing to win. Beulah is even looking forward to winning against a child. How will Cordelia handle the pressures of competing with someone who is not only ruthless, but much older and more experienced as well?

 

This picture book is a combination of entertainment and education. The plot mixed with adorable illustrations create an entertaining story, and the subject of the book allows for the opportunity to practice spelling with your young reader.

Randalee

 
 

Page-Turners to Share

Page-Turners to Share

posted by:
October 11, 2013 - 7:00am

Nighty Night, Little Green MonsterThe Spooky BoxTwo new Halloween books are sure to capture the imagination of the youngest readers. Nighty Night, Little Green Monster by Ed Emberley is the perfect bedtime book for the season. A colorful young monster’s features are described with simple adjectives as each turn of the die-cut page builds his face. Once the reader sees this silly rather than scary character, the refrain “nighty night” repeats as page-turning slowly makes him disappear. Emerging readers will enjoy paging through the book on their own as the visual clues help tell the story. Go Away, Big Green Monster, now a modern childhood classic, was published by the same Caldecott-winning author/illustrator in 1992.

 

Whatever could be inside graphic designer/author Mark Gonyea’s The Spooky Box? The narrator speculates that the simply depicted black box could be filled with any number of creepy things, from bats to rats to spiders. Each page is more visually exciting than the last, as Gonyea skillfully builds suspense. Breaking down the fourth wall, he orders the reader to open the box to reveal its contents. Noises are now coming from within, and the speculation continues. This is a book that children and adults will enjoy equally; its surprise ending provides an opportunity for plenty of what-if discussions that will last long after the book is over. Gonyea dedicates his striking orange and black picture book to “everyone who loves thinking of endless possibilities.”

Paula G.

 
 

From The Hunger Games to Picture Book

Year of the JungleThe bestselling author that brought you The Hunger Games series is showing her versatility with Year of the Jungle, a picture book about Suzanne Collins as a little girl whose dad serves in the Vietnam War. Collins collaborates with illustrator James Proimos to bring this touching picture book to young readers.

 

This book follows young Suzy as she sees her dad off to Vietnam without truly understanding the ramifications of his going away. While he is gone she looks forward to his postcards and feels the loss more deeply than she is able to express. Days go by and turn into months as holidays and seasons pass without her father. She can’t understand the concept of a year and has to just keep waiting for his return with no idea as to how long she will have to wait.

 

Collins seeks to capture the impact that serving in the military can have on the children of those brave soldiers. She reached back to remember how she felt as a 6-year-old coping with the loss of her father. Collins talks in this short video about her experience writing Year of the Jungle. This picture book is honest and heartfelt, though not too graphic or intense for young readers, especially if they have a loved one serving in the military.

Randalee

 
 

Color Your World

Color Your World

posted by:
September 25, 2013 - 7:55am

Cover art for My Blue Is HappyCover art for Henri's ScissorsColors arouse emotions, but the feelings evoked are as unique as each person. Jessica Young tackles this concept in My Blue Is Happy. Readers follow one girl as she explores with family and friends and shares her original ideas about colors. Her best friend likes pink because it’s pretty, but our protagonist finds it annoying, like a piece of gum stuck to your shoe or a bug bite. Chocolate is ordinary says her dad, but this little girl thinks it’s special like chocolate syrup. The girl travels through her world in nine colors, concisely expressing her ideas about each. Illustrator Catia Chen’s vibrant acrylic illustrations capture all the personalities of the colors. Sure gray can be cold like a rainstorm, but if you’re cuddling with grandma on a cozy chair it’s warm and fuzzy. Young deftly explores the idea of contrasts and encourages readers to carefully consider the different feelings colors suggest.

 

In Henri’s Scissors, written and illustrated by Jeanette Winter, color is the star, helping an aging artist reinvent his creative self. Winter covers Mattise’s early years and journey toward becoming an artist, but her focus here is on the last years of his life, following an illness that left him unable to paint. When faced without a creative outlet, Matisse was overjoyed when he picked up a pair of scissors and started cutting colored paper. He transformed his sick room into a secret fantasy garden filled with vibrant flowers and showy birds. The illustrations, acrylic and cut-paper, are simple, yet perfectly depict the joy Matisse felt while amidst some of his finest works. This is a tender homage to a man whose legacy is such everlasting beauty.
 

Maureen

 
 

Ahoy, Me Hearties!

Ahoy, Me Hearties!

posted by:
September 19, 2013 - 7:00am

Cover art for A Pirate's Guide to RecessCover art for Twenty-six PiratesCover art for Peek-a-Boo PiratesImagination runs wild in James Preller’s A Pirate’s Guide to Recess, illustrated by Greg Ruth. Cap’n Red and his merry crew are off on an adventure to find treasure when the lookout spies Molly and her mates. When Red calls for Molly’s surrender, his crew turns mutinous. Will Red be marooned on the open seas or will he be saved by the recess bell? Ruth’s illustrations easily delineate between full color reality and the line drawings in sepia and blue of the imaginary world. A homework section at the end of the book will help the reader expand their piratical vocabulary. This book is a follow up to Preller’s A Pirates Guide to First Grade.
 

Dave Horowitz takes us on a rhyming journey through the alphabet in Twenty-six Pirates.  A call has gone out to assemble the crew of the Sea Princess, and 26 boys arrive in the hopes of joining the frog captain’s crew.  From Arty to Zach, each boy’s name represents a letter of the alphabet. The illustrations are colorful and comical. Your little buccaneer will enjoy looking for the letters on each page.
 

Younger mateys will be delighted reading Peek-a-Boo Pirates by Charles Reasoner. The cardboard pages, simple dialogue and sweet illustrations are appealing to the wee rapscallions. Toddlers can identify each of the different animals of the pirate crew as they follow the treasure map to where X marks the spot.

Christina

 
 

Back to School

Back to School

posted by:
September 4, 2013 - 7:00am

Chamelia and the New Kid in ClassIt’s that time of year again. With kids going back to school there are no doubt many new and exciting experiences. Chamelia is back to school as well and she is in for a surprise. Checkout Chamelia and the New Kid in Class by Ethan Long for that student in your life.

 

Chamelia has always been the center of attention and as the star of her class she’s not used to sharing the spotlight. On her first day of school she is stealing the show with an engaging story of her summer vacation when, much to her chagrin, a new boy is introduced to the class. Suddenly, attention is focused on someone other than Chamelia and she has to learn how to deal with the new class dynamic. Will she rise to the occasion or sink to new lows in order to regain her status as the center of attention?

 

This book is great for kids getting back into the groove of school, though it’s not the first book about this endearing character. If your child likes this book, checkout the book titled Chamelia as well. According to Long’s website, there is a television series in development. So look for more Chamelia to come.

Randalee

 
 

First Day of School

First Day of School

posted by:
August 26, 2013 - 7:55am

Cover art for MonstergartenCover art for You're Wearing That to School?!You have your backpack, freshly sharpened pencils, shiny new crayons and all the other items on the school supply list. But are you really ready for the first day of school? That’s what Patrick is worried about in Monstergarten by Daniel J. Mahoney. A first-grader told him that he had to be scary for his first day of monstergarten. Teaming up with his friend Kevin, Patrick practices making scary faces, his fearsome roars and showing his claws. But even after all his practice, Patrick is worried that he will not be scary enough. Fortunately, his monster mommy gives him the best advice – just be yourself. Children will be able to relate to Patrick in this brightly illustrated picture book.

 

Sometimes it is hard to just be yourself, especially someone else is telling you what they think is best. That’s what Penelope, a hippo, faces in You’re Wearing That to School?! by Lynn Plourde. Tiny, a mouse, means well and is trying the help his eccentric best friend Penelope fit in for her first day of school. From what to wear to what to bring to show-and-tell, Tiny wants to make sure that Penelope’s first day will be a success. Will Penelope heed Tiny’s advice? Or will she stay true to herself and prove that being unique is the best way to have a successful first day of school? Parents will also enjoy sharing with their kids the “Tips for a Hippo Happy First Day of School” that can be found at the end of the book.

Christina