Welcome to the Baltimore County Public Library.

Baltimore County Public Library logo BCPL Homework Help: Your Key to a Successful School Year.
   
Type of search:   
BCPL on FacebookBCPL on TwitterBCPL on TumblrBCPL on YouTubeBCPL on Flickr

Between the Covers / Shhhh... we're reading.   Photo of reading after bedtime
Children | Fiction | Picture Book

 

RSS this blog

Tags

Adult

+ Fiction

   Fantasy

   Graphic Novel

   Historical

   Horror

   Humor

   Legal

   Literary

   Magical Realism

   Media Tie-In

   Mystery

   Mythology

   Paranormal

   Romance

   Science Fiction

   Thriller

+ Nonfiction

Teen

+ Fiction

   Adventure

   Dystopian

   Fantasy

   Graphic Novel

   Historical

   Humor

   Media Tie-In

   Mystery

   Paranormal

   Realistic

   Romance

   Science Fiction

   Steampunk

   Nonfiction

Children

+ Fiction

   Adventure

   Beginning Reader

   Concepts

   Fantasy

   First Chapter Book

   Graphic Novel

   Historical

   Humor

   Media Tie-In

   Mystery

   Picture Book

   Realistic

   Tales

+ Nonfiction

Author Interviews

Awards

In the News

Bloggers

 

Off to School We Go

Off to School We Go

posted by:
August 19, 2014 - 7:00am

Cover art for EddaCover art for Monsters Love SchoolAs summer draws to an end, it’s time to start getting the little ones ready for school. This new adventure can be a little scary for kids. What will they do at school? Will they make any friends? Will their teacher be nice? Help your child prepare for the first day of school with these new picture books.
 

Being the littlest Valkyrie in Asgard is a lot of fun, but sometimes Edda wonders what it would be like to be with kids her own age. Fortunately, Edda’s papa knows just what to do in Edda: A Little Valkyrie’s First Day of School, written and illustrated by Adam Auerbach. Flying down to earth for her first day of school, Edda is worried. She’s never been away from Asgard and isn’t sure that she will fit in. Things are a lot different at school on earth than they are in Asgard, but Edda is brave and, through a writing assignment, soon makes some new friends. Auerbach’s simple pen and ink illustrations have been digitally colored and help tell this mythology-meets-real-life story.
 

Monsters love adventures, but with summer coming to an end, Blue must prepare to go on his biggest adventure of all in Monsters Love School, written and illustrated by Mike Austin. With the help of his monster friends, Blue makes sure he has all the supplies needed to start school. But why does he have to go to school? “I already know my ABGs and 413s and XYDs!” says Blue. Children will be able to relate to Blue’s worries and cheer him on as he experiences all the wonders of his first day at school. Digitally enhanced illustrations with monsters reminiscent of Monsters Inc., Austin’s book is sure to please your little monster.

Christina

 
 

Birdy Bath Time

Birdy Bath Time

posted by:
June 11, 2014 - 7:00am

The Pigeon Needs a Bath!Caldecott Honor winner Mo Willems has brought back his beloved pigeon character in the funny new picture book The Pigeon Needs a Bath! The bus driver, this time clad in a shower cap and bathrobe, once again needs your help. Pigeon is absolutely, positively filthy. It’s been about a month, maybe even longer, since Pigeon had a bath. Goodness sakes, Pigeon is really starting to smell. He’s so stinky that the flies buzzing around Pigeon don’t want to be near him. Can you help convince Pigeon that he should take a bath?

 

Sixth in the Pigeon series, we last saw Pigeon two years ago co-starring in The Duckling Gets a Cookie!? Duckling makes an appearance in Pigeon’s new book in the form of a rubber ducky in the bath tub. Cartoon-like illustrations transition from muddy brown to bright, clean colors as Pigeon finally gets into the bath and starts to get clean. He’s having so much fun, he may never get out of the bath tub!

 

Whether it’s driving a bus, finding a hot dog, staying up late or wanting a puppy, Pigeon is sure to delight young children with his requests, which may also mimic some of the desires of the audience as well. Willems, both author and illustrator, has been awarded three Caldecott Honors, two Theodor Seuss Geisel Medals and Three Geisel Honors for his children’s books. And as your little ones progress from picture books to beginning readers, they are sure to also enjoy his Elephant & Piggie series.

Christina

 
 

The Cat’s Meow

Hellow Kitty: Surprise! by Jacob ChabotNat the Cat Can Sleep Like That by Victoria AllenbyBeloved character Hello Kitty returns to delight in a third graphic novel Hello Kitty: Surprise! by Jacob Chabot and Ian McGinty. A compilation of 10 short stories, this nearly wordless book follows Hello Kitty and her friends on a myriad of adventures. Whether they are enjoying a day at the beach, finding a large, mysterious egg or going on a pirate adventure, each story has some sort of unexpected twist that will keep you wondering what could possibly happen next. Can a book really transport you to another place? And what will Kitty’s parents do when they come to Kitty’s rocking birthday party? Hello Kitty fans are sure to enjoy!

 

If you are looking for a picture book to enjoy with your little cat lover, look no further than Nat the Cat Can Sleep Like That written by Victoria Allenby and illustrated by Tara Anderson. It’s daytime, and while the world buzzes around him, Nat the cat is enjoying his naps. Whether in dresser drawers or in front of doors, on the stairs or on chairs, this orange tabby can be found sleeping in all kinds of strange, albeit realistic places. Despite all that his black and white kitten buddy tries, Nat will not let the noise of the piano the kitten’s juggling act disturb him from getting a nice daytime snooze. However, there is one thing that Nat cannot sleep through. Can you guess what that is? To find out, you will just have to pick up this whimsical rhyming book filled with playful and fun illustrations.

Christina

 
 

From Winter to Spring

From Winter to Spring

posted by:
April 9, 2014 - 7:00am

Cover art for Brimsby's HatsCover art for Sparky!Cover art for Some BugsThree strong new picture books are sure to bring smiles to young readers and their caregivers. Debut author/illustrator Andrew Prahin brings us Brimsby’s Hats, wherein the title character owns and operates a small mail-order hat business out of his cozy home. Each day, his badger friend comes to help design and box the millinery, until one day when it is time for the striped one to set off on a new adventure. Lonely Brimsby must find new friends and a new purpose. Soft digital pastels and engaging characters lift this fine tale that covers the well-worn topic of adjusting to change.  
 

In Sparky!, by Jenny Offill and Chris Appelhans, a young girl is desperate to have a pet. Her mother declines the pleas, citing the amount of work that is required. Undaunted, she has a sloth sent from Brazil, and instantly (and, as it turns out, ironically) calls him Sparky. The young girl attempts to teach him the sorts of tricks that she expects him to learn, to no avail. He prefers to be a sloth-like sloth! Cool watercolors, hand-drawn lettering and touches of humor for kids and adults are all present in this story of measured expectations.

 

Some Bugs, by Angela DiTerlizzi and Brendan Wenzel, is a raucous introduction to many insects and related crawlers. In simple verse, countless attributes of some bugs are relayed. Each double-page spread brings much to look for, as the young reader may want to try to identify which bugs are depicted. Wenzel’s collage-like, mixed-media illustrations are entomologically accurate but with exaggerated bug eyes. At the end, all of the creatures are identified, including a cat that makes multiple appearances during the proceedings. This picture book is a bright, fun reminder of the insects that soon will again be upon our backyards.

Todd

 
 

Celebrating Differences

Jacob's New Dress by Sarah and Ian HoffmanWalk down the toy aisles at your local store and you will see that the aisles are divided into two categories. The aisles with shelves lined in pink that contain the soft, sweet, nurturing toys are obviously marketed toward girls. Those blue shelves with the rough-and-tumble, mechanical looking toys built for speed and smashing things, well, that’s where the boys should shop. But what if your child doesn’t conform to society’s gender norms? Then perhaps you may enjoy Jacob’s New Dress by Sarah and Ian Hoffman, illustrated by Chris Case.

 

Jacob loves to play dress-up at school with his best friend, Emily. Although most boys in his class want to dress as a knight, fireman or dragon, Jacob is much happier when he puts on a pretty dress and imagines that he is a princess. Even though he is being teased by some of his classmates, Jacob musters up the courage to ask his mom if he can wear a regular dress, not just a playtime dress, to school. While his parents don’t immediately embrace the idea, Jacob’s mom helps him sew a dress to wear to school. With the support of his parents (“Well, it’s not what I would wear, but you look great” – Jacob’s Father) and his teacher (“I think Jacob wears what he’s comfortable in. Just like you do. Not very long ago little girls couldn’t wear pants. Can you imagine that?”), Jacob shows everyone that there is more than one way to be a boy.

 

Case’s soft, moving illustrations help set the mood of the story while the Hoffmans’ text conveys far more than a singular lesson. This story is great for teaching children about diversity, acceptance and self-confidence. The authors’ note at the end of the book helps to explain how all adults who play a role in raising, nurturing and educating children can make a difference in the lives of those children who do not conform to typical gender roles.

Christina

 
 

Family Mouse at the Manor House

Cover art for Mouseton AbbeyWant to share your love of Downton Abbey with your little one? Look no further than Mouseton Abbey: The Missing Diamond by Nick Page. This estate, populated by mice and presided over by Roquefort, the present Lord Mouseton, has an impressive history — it was originally a monastery and even survived the War of the Fondues!

 

At Mouseton Abbey, it's Cheesemas, and Roquefort has misplaced the Great Big Cheesy Diamond, which is a tradition for the family’s Cheesemas banquet. Lady Brie, the Countess of Mouseton, is well acquainted with her husband’s habit of losing things and even tried buying him a planner at one point (which he lost). Soon, everyone at Mouseton Abbey from Roquefort and Lady Brie’s three daughters to the household staff is on a search for the diamond. But with last-minute banquet preparations underway, Roquefort is causing more disorder and housekeeping angst as he tears apart rooms and upsets cooking preparations in search of the treasure. Will the family find the diamond and be able to keep their Cheesemas tradition?

 

Adorable knitted mouse characters set in delightfully sketched rooms make this a fun and enchanting story, and the humor and mice misadventures will be appreciated by both adults and children. There is even a character chart in the beginning of the book with names and titles (Lady Gouda, in dress and demeanor, bears more than a passing resemblance to Downton’s Lady Violet). With the mice’s names — Wensleydale, Ricotta, Fontina — it could be a lesson in cheeses as well as aristocratic country estates!

Melanie

 
 

Harlem Homages

Harlem Homages

posted by:
February 21, 2014 - 8:00am

Sugar Hill: Harlem's Historic NeighborhoodA Dance Like Starlight: One Ballerina's DreamHarlem in the early 20th century was home to some of the most successful African-Americans in the country. In Sugar Hill: Harlem’s Historic Neighborhood, Carole Boston Weatherford (born and raised in Baltimore!) takes readers inside a remarkable part of Harlem and introduces its famous residents. Weatherford’s energetic rhymes are perfect for reading aloud and R. Gregory Christie’s bold illustrations capture the excitement of this dynamic community. Single lines of text encapsulate the contributions of the men and women who contributed so much in such an array of fields. Artists, musicians, entertainers, civil rights leaders and lawyers are all represented, including Faith Ringgold, Miles Davis, W.E.B. DuBois and Thurgood Marshall. Biographical blurbs offer further information, but this is really a tribute to an influential community that cherished its artists, dreamers and leaders.

 

Kristy Dempsey imagines the life of one young Harlem resident in A Dance Like Starlight: One Ballerina’s Dream. This lyrical tale told in powerful free verse is narrated by a young girl growing up in 1950s Harlem. Her mother works tirelessly as a seamstress at the Metropolitan Opera House, and while waiting for her to finish up, the narrator dances in the wings. She attracts the attention of the Ballet Master, who invites her to join his class. But this lively little girl still wonders, “Could a colored girl like me / ever become / a prima ballerina?" When she attends the debut performance of Janet Collins, the first African-American prima ballerina, at the Met on November 13, 1951 the young girl realizes her dream can come true. Coretta Scott King Award-winning illustrator Floyd Cooper sumptuously illustrates this story of hope and inspiration and vividly brings to life one young Harlem girl.

Maureen

 
 

Share the Love

Share the Love

posted by:
February 11, 2014 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Runaway HugCover art for Love Is RealCover art for Love Your More Than AnythingValentine’s Day will be here soon. However, you don’t need the calendar to read February 14 in order to share some heartwarming picture books about love with your little ones. In The Runaway Hug, written by Nick Bland and illustrated by Freya Blackwood, a little girl named Lucy asks her mommy for a hug before bedtime. This hug is special because it’s the very last one that her mommy has and because of that, Lucy promises that she will return the hug back to her. Lucy decides that she must share this very special last hug with everyone else in her family.  She shares this last hug with her daddy, the twins and the baby before sharing it with the family dog, Annie. But when Lucy tries to get the hug back from Annie, the dog runs away playfully and takes Mommy’s very last hug with her.  Will Lucy be able to keep her promise to return the last hug to her mommy? Bland’s text meshes well with Blackwood’s illustrations, depicting a loving and somewhat chaotic home to which parents will easily relate.
 

Even though love is not something that you can see or touch, love can be found all around us in Love Is Real, written by Janet Lawler and illustrated by Anna Brown. Using rhyme, Lawler tells a story about how love can be found in simple acts of kindness. Adorable families of forest creatures show how everything they do throughout the day, from helping you get dressed in the morning to putting a bandage on a skinned knee, are examples that love is real.
 

Another book about love featuring forest animals is Love You More Than Anything by Anna Harber Freeman. Children will love the simple rhyming text and bright, playful illustrations by Jed Henry.  Whether it’s ladybugs, playing on the playground or a bubble bath, there is nothing that the chipmunk parents love more than their little kids.

Christina

 
 

Friend or Food?

Friend or Food?

posted by:
January 31, 2014 - 7:55am

It’s hard work for picture book protagonists to get a decent meal these days. In Buddy and the Bunnies in: Don’t Play with Your Food, our hero is a monster to be reckoned with. All frantic mouth and teeth, wide eyes and pointy claws, Buddy announces his intention to eat a trio of peaceful, checkers-playing white rabbits. But these clever lagomorphs have other ideas for keeping Buddy busy, beginning with playing hide and seek and baking  a dozen delicious cupcakes. Each day the horned, orange-striped monster returns for a rabbit repast, and each day there are more bunnies who are too much fun to eat. Children are guaranteed to laugh out loud at Buddy’s wild mood swings, from frightening and frantic to endearing and delighted, broadly depicted by author-illustrator Bob Shea. His bold, bright pastel palette adds to the story’s upbeat, energetic tone. Buddy and the Bunnies demands repeat read-alouds.

 

The trench-coated fox of Mike Twohy’s Outfoxed makes a midnight run to the chicken coop, mistakenly grabbing a duck in his haste. The two return to his den, where the exhausted predator is all set to cook his prey. But this is no ordinary duck! Thinking on her feet, the fowl proclaims that she is actually a dog. Duck jumps and slobbers and barks, working hard to convince Fox of her worthiness as a canine companion. Twohy, a longtime cartoonist for The New Yorker, uses a brightly inked comic book style to tell this comedy of mistaken identity. Young readers are sure to delight at Duck’s misbehaving dog act, while the book invites a debate of the merits of the old saying “if it looks like a duck and quacks like a duck, it’s a duck.” Outfoxed is sure to be a story time favorite.

Paula G.

 
 

Kung Hei Fat Choi!

Kung Hei Fat Choi!

posted by:
January 31, 2014 - 7:55am

On Jan. 31, many will celebrate the first day of the Chinese New Year and welcome in the Year of the Horse. It is a time to let go of the troubles of the past year, to clear one’s debts and to start anew. These tenets are found in Goldy Luck and the Three Pandas by Natasha Yim, a delightful picture book illustrated by Grace Zong.

 

A retelling of Goldilocks and the Three Bears, Yim’s tale is set in a Chinese town, the bears are pandas and the porridge is congee. Despite her name, Goldy Luck does not feel all that lucky. While on her errand to wish her neighbors a happy new year, Goldy spills the plate of turnip cakes she had been carrying. Her neighbors, the Chens, are not home, and when Goldy tries to clean up the mess she discovers bowls of congee – a porridge made of rice. Following the traditional story, she ends up eating the porridge, breaking a chair and sleeping in a bed that is just right. When discovered by the neighbors, she runs away. Will the tenets of the new year bring Goldy back to the Chens’ to set things right? And can she reconcile her differences with Little Chen? Children will love the familiarity of the story and the colorful illustrations. A recipe for turnip cakes can be found in the back to add to your own celebration of the new year.

 

If you would like to celebrate Chinese New Year at the library, please visit our Owings Mills Branch at 2 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 1. Children ages 5 to 12 will enjoy stories and a craft. For more information on this and other programs, please refer to our dateLines page.

Christina