Welcome to the Baltimore County Public Library.

Baltimore County Public Library logo Connecting the Community: Holiday Toy Drive
   
Type of search:   
BCPL on FacebookBCPL on TwitterBCPL on TumblrBCPL on YouTubeBCPL on Flickr

Between the Covers / Shhhh... we're reading.   Photo of reading after bedtime
Children | Fiction | Adventure

 

RSS this blog

Tags

Adult

+ Fiction

   Fantasy

   Graphic Novel

   Historical

   Horror

   Humor

   Legal

   Literary

   Magical Realism

   Media Tie-In

   Mystery

   Mythology

   Paranormal

   Romance

   Science Fiction

   Thriller

+ Nonfiction

Teen

+ Fiction

   Adventure

   Dystopian

   Fantasy

   Graphic Novel

   Historical

   Humor

   Media Tie-In

   Mystery

   Paranormal

   Realistic

   Romance

   Science Fiction

   Steampunk

   Nonfiction

Children

+ Fiction

   Adventure

   Beginning Reader

   Concepts

   Fantasy

   First Chapter Book

   Graphic Novel

   Historical

   Humor

   Media Tie-In

   Mystery

   Picture Book

   Realistic

   Tales

+ Nonfiction

Author Interviews

Awards

In the News

Bloggers

 

Myth or Monster

Myth or Monster

posted by:
September 11, 2014 - 6:00am

Cover art for The Yeti FilesThe legends of Bigfoot and his cryptid relatives (Yeti, Chupacabra, etc.) have been around for centuries, but author/illustrator Kevin Sherry has put a new spin on this old standard. In The Yeti Files #1: Meet the Bigfeet, Sherry tells the story from a Yeti’s point of view. Told in semi-graphic novel style with lots of illustrations, the reader is introduced to Blizz Richards, the Yeti narrator, and many of his friends and relatives. After receiving an invitation to a Bigfeet family reunion, Blizz relates how such reunions used to be held annually until his cousin Brian broke the code of the cryptid community and vanished forever.
 

Filled with silly humor, the story follows the plight of Blizz and his helpers — a goblin, an elf and an Arctic fox — as they try to find Brian and thwart the attempts of an evil cryptozoologist who wants to expose the cryptids to the world! While elementary aged children will undoubtedly enjoy the illustrations and offbeat story, Sherry has put enough subtle details in his drawings to entertain older readers too. The vocabulary can be a bit daunting, but Sherry does explain some of the more difficult terms (for example, cryptid is “a hidden animal whose existence has never been proven”). The first book in a new series, the story ends with a teaser for the next installment which may involve the Loch Ness Monster!

 

Kevin Sherry is a local Baltimore author who also founded Squidfire.com, an online t-shirt business.

Regina

 
 

A Hidden Masterpiece

A Hidden Masterpiece

posted by:
July 28, 2014 - 7:00am

Cover art for Under the EggTheodora Tenpenny has more than her share of burdens for a 13-year-old. With the death of her beloved grandfather Jack, Theo has been thrust into the role as head of the household which includes taking care of her sweet but thoroughly withdrawn mother, tending to the family’s crumbling, 200-year-old Greenwich Village townhome, fending off creditors and trying to make ends meet with a legacy of less than $500. Fortunately, her grandfather’s dying words have given her some hope. “Look under the egg,” he tells her, hinting that a supposed fortune lies waiting there.  In Laura Marx Fitzgerald’s Under the Egg, this clue sets the plucky and resourceful Theo on a series of adventures that she could never have anticipated.

 

Fitzgerald does an amazing job of capturing not only what Theo is feeling as she is forced to take over the role of parent to her ineffectual mother, but how Theo manages to still behave like a typical 13-year-old girl. One thing Theo yearns for almost as much as a way out of her financial nightmare is to have a friend.  When she meets Bodhi, the daughter of a Hollywood couple temporarily living down the street from Theo, the two girls instantly bond.  They decide to team up to figure out the mystery surrounding an odd painting that Theo discovers in Jack’s studio.  Is this the work of the world-renowned artist Raphael? If so, how did Theo’s grandfather acquire it? Soon Theo discovers that Jack also worked with the famous “Monuments Men” group during World War II, and she is confronted by even more questions. It’s up to Theo and Bodhi to solve these questions and discover the real mystery lying “under the egg.”  
 

Regina

 
 

Game On!

Game On!

posted by:
January 13, 2014 - 7:55am

Cover art for Game OnThe son of two famous stage magicians, Max Flash is himself a great escape artist, contortionist and illusionist.  These very qualities prompt his parents’ true employer, the Department for Extraordinary Activity (DFEA) to recruit him for a special assignment. In Game On, Max’s first mission is to close the portal between the video game world (Virtuals’ world) and the real world (Gamers’ world) before the Virtuals take over.  With the use of a special USB gadget, Max is thrust into the Virtual world via a computer hard drive. His task is to locate the escaped Virtual, Deezil, and close the portal between the two worlds. As he travels from game to game looking for the portal and the evil Deezil, Max must avoid race cars, battle centurions and flee farmers in his quest to save the Gamer world. Relying only on his own cunning and special skills (and some nifty gadgets from the DFEA), Max defies death and suppresses the Virtual uprising before returning home.

 

The first in the Max Flash series by Jonny Zucker, Game On is a fast paced adventure and the start of a fabulous series for young readers. Max’s further missions will have him battling aliens in space, robots in a parallel universe, an Egyptian curse, and mysterious beings in the Antarctic. With original stories, a likable hero and short, action-filled chapters, Max Flash is an all-around great read. Fans of the television series Phineas and Ferb will enjoy this series for its quirky storylines and action-packed heroic adventures.

Diane

 
 

A Circus of Fun for All Ages

The Show Must Go On!Sir Sidney runs a very unusual circus. Children are admitted free, everyone is given complimentary popcorn and lemonade, and he manages to keep his ticket prices to $1 for adults. While this may seem like an odd business model to adults, children will be delighted by The Show Must Go On!, the first book in the Three-Ring Rascals series by Kate Klise. Klise and her sister M. Sarah Klise, who draws the whimsical illustrations, have collaborated on other children’s books including Letters from Camp and Regarding the Fountain and their teamwork makes for a fast-paced story with plenty of pictures.

 

Sir Sidney loves his circus, but he decides he needs to take a break and advertises for someone to take over for him. Enter Barnabas Brambles, a somewhat shady character who presents his certificate from the University of Piccadilly Circus in London, England to prove he is a “certified lion tamer.” The wary Sir Sidney decides to let Brambles take over the circus for a week on a trial basis. Soon it becomes apparent that Brambles is up to no good, and the plucky performers must act quickly to save their beloved circus. Children who love animals and circuses will find plenty to like, even adults will enjoy the silly humor that is a trademark of the Klise sisters.

Regina

 
 

Imagination Run Wild

Imagination Run Wild

posted by:
October 15, 2013 - 6:00am

The Sasquatch EscapeThe Lonely Lake MonsterWhere would you take an injured baby dragon? To the imaginary veterinary if you are lucky enough to have one in town. The Sasquatch Escape is the first book in the Imaginary Veterinary series by Suzanne Selfors. In it, two 10-year-olds, Ben and Pearl, find themselves living in what could be the most boring town in the world, Buttonville. The Button factory has long been closed down when Ben moves in with his grandfather while his parents work out some “issues.”  Pearl has lived there her whole life and is well-known as a troublemaker…so much so that she has been banned from the bookstore and other children are not allowed to play with her! When Ben’s cat catches a baby dragon, Ben and Pearl take the dragon to the only animal doctor in town, Dr. Woo of Dr. Woo’s Worm Hospital, located inside the old button factory. All is not as it seems at the Worm Hospital, as the children discover when a Sasquatch is let loose on the town!   

 

Book two in the series, The Lonely Lake Monster, continues Ben and Pearl’s adventures as apprentices at the Worm Hospital. Tasked with trimming the Sasquatch’s toenails on the first day, they quickly become distracted by an enormous lake monster and a leprechaun with a head cold. When the lonely lake monster catches Ben for a pet, it is up to Pearl to save him (ideally without being caught breaking the rules, again!)

 

The Imaginary Veterinary series is filled with delightful characters from both the real world and the imaginary world. Underlying themes of loyalty and resilience add to the rich plotline. Selfors alternates points of view for each book, with book one being told from Ben’s point of view, and book two being told from Pearl’s. She adds some enrichment activities to the end of each book challenging the reader to use their imaginations with some writing, art and science activities.  She also adds some background to the mythical creatures described in each book.  This is an excellent adventure series for children who enjoy a little bit of fantasy. The third book, The Rain Dragon Rescue, is due out in January 2014.

Diane

 
 

A Funny Thing Happened…

A Funny Thing Happened…

posted by:
October 15, 2013 - 6:00am

Fortunately, The MilkIn Neil Gaiman’s latest children’s book, Fortunately, The Milk, a father goes through an incredible series of side adventures as he tries to return home with a bottle of milk from the local store. In fact, it seems as if this hapless man encounters every sort of being from children’s literature: aliens, dinosaurs, pirates, vampires (which Gaiman calls ‘wumpires’), ponies and human-sacrificing islanders. After the father is late coming home with milk for his children’s cereal, he relates a tale that is both fantastic and silly about travelling through time with a very intelligent Stegosaurus. Naturally, his children don’t believe a word he says, but a twist at the end makes them wonder if there was any truth in his alibi.

   

Gaiman, whose past books include Coraline and The Graveyard Book, shares a story that could easily be turned into a Tim Burton film. Burton and Gaiman have collaborated in the past and it feels as if this book was written with a movie deal in mind. The pen and ink illustrations by Skottie Young add to the humor and give a definite comic book flavor to the tale. For youngsters who enjoy a fast-paced read with plenty of pictures, Fortunately, The Milk delivers in barely more than 100 pages.  

Regina

 
 

Starting Over

Starting Over

posted by:
September 23, 2013 - 6:00am

Cover art for Sky JumpersForty years after World War III decimated the world’s population with its Green Bombs and catastrophically altered the Earth's landscape, a young girls leaps off a mountain without a parachute. Thus begins Sky Jumpers by Peggy Eddleman. As a result of the Green Bombs, metals formed different properties, new plants grew and electricity has been wiped out. Twelve-year-old Hope Toriella lives in a community formed in the crater of a bomb blast high in the mountains. Her small town focuses on re-inventing the lost technology of the bygone era. Her teacher shows them relics of cell phones, flashlights and cameras. New inventions range from a slotted spoon to medicines that combat new diseases. The bombs also created bands of air called the Bomb’s Breath, so dense a person will suffocate with just one inhalation. Miserably inept at inventing, Hope takes solace in the thrill of diving off a cliff through the Bomb’s Breath. The dense air slows her descent; she just has to remember to hold her breath. When word gets out that Hope’s town has medicine that combats the dreaded new Shadel’s Sickness, bandits take the town hostage until all of the medicine is turned over. To save her town, Hope and her friends must traverse dangerous terrains through the worst blizzard conditions since the war to seek help, all the while avoiding both bandits and the Bomb’s Breath.
 

This fast-paced adventure reads like a cross between a Wild West novel and a Mad Max movie. The author crafts an engaging, nail-biting story with strong characters and a great finish. Descriptions of the new earth are seamlessly woven into the plot, offering the reader a clear understanding of this altered world without sacrificing its storyline. Sky Jumpers is the first book in an anticipated series, with book two expected to be published in fall 2014. Young fans of science fiction and action adventure books will love Sky Jumpers.

 

(Release date 9/24/13)

Diane

 
 

The Sweetness at the Bottom of Pi in the Sky

Cover art for Pi in the SkyFrom the author of Every Soul a Star comes a story that’s out of this world — literally! In Pi in the Sky, Wendy Mass weaves an imaginative tale of worlds colliding, and the rollercoaster adventure that results.
 

Joss is a seventh son. Not just any seventh son, but the seventh son of the Supreme Overlord of the Universe. Expecting a superhero, imbued with extraordinary powers and responsibilities? Guess again. Despite what you may have heard, being that special “seventh son” does not imbue you with any great powers or great responsibilities — even if your dad is the SOU. With six older brothers, the greatest responsibility Joss has ever held is delivering pies across The Realms to the Powers That Be.
 

That’s right; a glorified pie delivery boy.
 

Mind you, these aren’t ordinary pies, but more about that later...
 

To date, Joss’ life has revolved around going to school (even immortals need an education), hanging out with his best friend Kal and getting those pies delivered on time. Then one day, a girl from Earth winds up in The Realms after her planet has been obliterated and Joss’ whole world is thrown out of orbit. Upgraded from delivery boy to world architect, it’s up to Joss to somehow rebuild Earth with the help of the planet’s last human, Annika.
 

Pi in the Sky is a spirited fantasy of friendship, adventure and the awesome sciences that shape our world. It is a balanced story that is accessible and fun to read even as it incorporates some challenging concepts. The characters are relatable and the story is alternately playful and poignant. Chapters are headed by quotes from scientists and visionaries that succinctly capture the theme of the chapter to follow. Recommended for middle grade readers and, in particular, fans of Madeleine L’Engle’s A Swiftly Tilting Planet.

Meghan

 
 

Saved by a Crayon

Saved by a Crayon

posted by:
July 29, 2013 - 6:55am

Cover art for What We Found in the SofaThree friends find an abandoned sofa at their bus stop one day that not only changes their lives, but saves the lives of everyone they know. In fact, the title What We Found in the Sofa and How It Saved the World by Henry Clark pretty much gives away the plot. Middle school students River, Freak and Fiona live in Hellsboro, Pennsylvania, a fictitious town full of secrets and problems. Hellsboro, so named because of its bleak, Hell-like landscape, has a ‘coal seam fire’ that has been burning under the town for years. When the trio discovers the old sofa, they begin to find unusual items hidden in its cushions, including a very rare and valuable crayon. On a hunch, these tech savvy kids put the crayon on an online auction and are amazed when a bidding war starts.  However, crayon collectors aren’t the only ones interested in their findings. Can the three friends outwit a devious billionaire out to control the universe, an eccentric old inventor, an axe-wielding ghost and some bizarre flash mobs in time to save the world?

 

Clark’s debut novel is full of interesting and quirky characters, dialogue and situations similar to those found in J. K. Rowling’s Harry Potter or Edward Eager’s Half Magic series. While the friends try to save the world from impending doom, they also deal with issues that many young teens can relate to including peer pressure, not fitting in, dysfunctional family life and discovering who their real friends are. The story is told from River’s point of view, but all three of the main characters have unique voices and are well-drawn. While coal-seam fires are a real issue in parts of Pennsylvania, let's hope that none of them hide the secrets that River, Fiona and Freak uncover. 

Regina

 
 

Locked in the Library

Locked in the Library

posted by:
July 10, 2013 - 6:44am

Escape from Mr. Lemoncello's LibraryEscape from Mr. Lemoncello’s Library is a delightful treat for readers of all ages. This fast-paced, quirky puzzler by Chris Grabenstein is nothing but fun. Kyle Keeley is a 12-year-old boy used to the challenge of competing with his two older brothers. Friendly and popular, if not the most studious of students, Kyle is discouraged to realize that the essay contest he blew off will be judged by his hero, billionaire game designer, Luigi Lemoncello. Mr. Lemoncello has funded the building of a brand new, state-of-the-art, top-of-the-line, newer-than-new library for the town, which has not had one for twelve years. The winners of the essay contest will be the first to get their new library cards and will win a lock-in (a sleepover in the library) as well as a $500 gift certificate to Mr. Lemoncello’s store. Using a little bit of creativity and initiative, Kyle submits an improved entry and is one of twelve lucky 12-year-olds to win the prize. 

 

The action really starts when it is announced that those who wish to, may stay for another night and participate in a scavenger hunt to escape from the library. Using clues, holographic librarians, emergency help from the outside and all their wits, the young contestants work together, and against each other, to find the exit. Escape from Mr. Lemoncello’s Library lightly touches on themes of responsibility, teamwork and bullying, without getting preachy. It also showcases the increasing popularity of libraries as more than just a book repository.  Mr. Lemoncellos’s library has a board game room, a café and an Electronic Learning Center with 12 plasma televisions hooked into a catalog of educational video games. Fans of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory or The Gollywhopper Games will love this book.

Diane