Between the Covers / Shhhh... we're reading.   Photo of reading after bedtime
Adult

 

RSS this blog

Tags

Adult

+ Fiction

+ Nonfiction

Teen

+ Fiction

   Nonfiction

Children

+ Fiction

+ Nonfiction

Author Interviews

Awards

In the News

Bloggers

 


Sorcerer to the Crown

posted by: October 15, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Sorcerer to the Crown by Zen ChoLife could not be any more taxing for Zacharias Wythe, the newly designated Sorcerer Royal of the Society of Unnatural Philosophers in Zen Cho’s debut novel Sorcerer to the Crown. The magical transfer of power from the previous Sorcerer Royal has left him with a mysterious affliction that hurts every night at midnight. Rival magicians want to overthrow him not only because they believe he murdered his predecessor but also because Zacharias is a former slave who now holds the highest position in British magical society. The British government wants Zacharias to wage a magical feud against a group of witches in Southeast Asia who threaten British colonial interests there. To top it all off, England’s magic — fueled by a bond with Fairyland — is failing, and Zacharias’s newest task is to learn why, all while knowing his detractors would happily blame the decline of British magic on its newest Sorcerer Royal.

 

In order to stop the continued magical decay, Zacharias travels to Fairyland to see the Fairy King. On the journey there, Zacharias meets Prunella Gentleman, a young woman working at Mrs. Daubeney's School for Gentlewitches. Prunella has a few problems of her own, including her biracial parentage and lowborn station in society, and the “gifts” found in her father’s valise. Her decision to accompany Zacharias back to London so she can find a husband sparks a chain of events that will challenge the racist and sexist attitudes of the magical peerage and change magical society in England forever.

 

Fans of Gail Carriger and Susanna Clarke, as well as Jane Austen and Georgette Heyer, will enjoy this book immensely. It’s the first of a trilogy that promises to be an entertaining mix of Regency romance, political intrigue, social commentary and magical mayhem.


 
 

The Divine

posted by: October 15, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for The DivineMark is newly married and expecting his first child. As a demolitions technician, he has largely avoided many of the dangers and moral dilemmas usually associated with blowing things up, working from the safety of a lab and planning his future around his growing family. But his plans are frustrated when his promotion is denied and he is instead relocated to the paradoxically named Eden, Texas. Faced with a future of being cash-strapped in the scrublands, he apprehensively takes an offer from his profligate friend Jason to do contractual work for a secret military organization in Quanlom, an anonymous country in Southeast Asia. The Divine by Asaf and Tomer Hanuka is a visceral story of Mark’s descent into the civil war that is tearing the country apart.

 

Despite the violence implicit in his arrival, Mark remains a sympathetic protagonist, always trying to do the right thing in the face of many terrible choices. Quanlom’s war is a story of multiple narratives of conflict, with the added mystery of strange forces controlled by the rebelling faction’s child soldiers. What might have been a prosaic guts-n-glory plot is tempered with an instilled acknowledgment of the inherent atrocity of war. The premise of the book came about from the authors’ investigation of Apichart Weerawong’s famous photograph of Johnny and Luther Htoo, Burmese child soldiers, and the dazzling artwork does not neglect to reference the traditional art and design of the Southeast Asian setting. Readers may recognize Asaf Hanuka from his biographical graphic novel The Realist released earlier this year.

 

Liz

Liz

 
 

Movie Star by Lizzie Pepper

posted by: October 13, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Movie StarIn Hilary Liftin’s fictional tell-all biography, Movie Star by Lizzie Pepper, a young starlet falls in love with Rob Mars, Hollywood’s biggest star, marries him and begins a seemingly idyllic life among the A-listers. However, cracks quickly appear in Lizzie’s storybook life when Rob’s bizarre cultish group seeks to control their lives including how their twin sons should be raised. As Lizzie struggles to keep her identity, she realizes that the only way out is to make a break from this insular world. The problem is that the group is more powerful than she ever imagined and getting out could cost her everything.

 

Ostensibly, this is a fictitious biography that Liftin created from tabloid headlines, but the parallels between Lizzie and Rob and Katie Holmes and Tom Cruise are rather obvious. Lizzie began her career as a teenager on a popular TV drama that catapulted her to fame. Rob is very involved in a quasi-religious group that controls its followers through secretive rituals and uses its celebrity adherents to promote itself. Rob is also known for his high-wattage smile, doing all his own stunts and making grand public declarations of his love for Lizzie. While Liftin denies that she was specifically using Holmes and Cruise as her models for Lizzie and Rob, it’s hard to imagine who else she had in mind.

 

If you’re looking for a light, guilty pleasure read, then Movie Star by Lizzie Pepper definitely fits that bill. It may even shed some light on what a narrow world the rich and famous are forced to live in.


categories:

 
 

Judge This

posted by: October 8, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Judge ThisDo you often judge based on first impressions?

 

I do and so does Chip Kidd, the designer who has made many recognizable book covers. In his latest book, Judge This, Kidd validates our snap decision making. As with his earlier, all-ages introduction to graphic design, Go, which was previously reviewed, Kidd empowers those of us who aren’t in the industry to think critically about the way information is visually transmitted and received. He points out how necessary it is, in our modern age, to make the information we are constantly transmitting appealing and easy to understand. He presents a simple question for analyzing the success of virtually any design: Is it mysterious or clear? Kidd proves his point by illustrating examples of design from his daily life, critiquing everything from Diet Coke cans to pop-up ads. He also shows his own portfolio of work and explains the thought processes involved in their creation.

 

This book is one of a growing trend being published based on TED Talks and commencement speeches delivered by their authors. Constrained to an easily accessible, fun-sized format reminiscent of inspirational books like O’s Little Book of Happiness, and sourced from influential experts in their fields, they are philosophical texts for all of us with busy, complicated lives. NPR listeners will be familiar with many of the names coming from other publishers, including Make Good Art by Neil Gaiman, Very Good Lives by J K Rowling and We Should All Be Feminists by Chiamanda Ngozi Adichie.

 

Liz

Liz

 
 

Kitchens of the Great Midwest

posted by: October 8, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Kitchens of the Great MidwestWhat happens when quirky characters, unique structure and recipes are combined? You get J. Ryan Stradal’s debut novel, Kitchens of the Great Midwest. No, it’s not a coffee table book filled with staged photos of luxury Midwest kitchens; rather, it’s the compelling tale of misfit Midwesterner Eva Thorvald, a girl with a “once in a generation palate” who overcomes a tragic childhood to become a nationally renowned top reservationist chef.

Is this a great rags to riches story? Definitely! But it’s Stradal’s uncommon structure that makes this novel outstanding. Nine offbeat Midwesterners in nine separate chapters tell their respective stories. Outcasts in their own lives, each one is connected to Eva. This is a winning move by Stradel. Not only are we presented with Eva’s viewpoint, but we also see how she’s perceived by others and how their actions propelled Eva forward in her career. Eva only speaks to the reader as a middle schooler with a talent for both growing and using habaneros as a weapon. We learn of her early childhood through her father Lars, a good chef but socially awkward man with a passionate hatred for Lutefisk. We discover how she decided to pursue “theme” dinners from Octavia, a twentysomething wife cheating on her husband. Each character is both believable and flawed. They will make you laugh, cringe and reflect, but more importantly, care. You will want to know what happens to them and to Eva. And, as an added bonus, real Midwestern recipes from actual North Dakota Lutheran church members are scattered throughout the story. You may even want to try a few.

 

If you have been searching for an enjoyable, mind-fulfilling read that you do not want to end, you must read Kitchens of the Great Midwest. And like a favorite meal, be prepared to devour it. It is that good!


 
 

Failing Bravely

posted by: October 7, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Fail, Fail Again, Fail BetterCover art for Brave EnoughWhether you’re a recent graduate cautiously beginning your post-college existence or someone who has been fumbling through adulthood for years, you will find something to inspire you in these two new books about living a brave and compassionate life. 

 
Fail, Fail Again, Fail Better: Wise Advice for Leaning into the Unknown by Pema Chödrön was originally a commencement address made at Naropa University to the graduating class of 2014 — which included Chödrön’s granddaughter — on the “fine art of failing.” Chödrön, an American-born Buddhist nun, has written extensively about the themes she touches on in her speech, and her message resonates at any stage of life: Prepare for the inevitability of failure, and welcome the unwelcome. This slim volume with its simple brushstroke illustrations also includes an interview with the author where she addresses a variety of real-life situations, including what to do when your failure is so great that it results in another person’s death. 

 
Memoirist and novelist Cheryl Strayed gives us Brave Enough, a compilation of quotes from her previous books, including Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail, and her “Dear Sugar” advice column. Rather than recounting anecdotes from 18th century Tibet, Strayed uses metaphors and imagery more grounded in the contemporary experience. “Forgiveness doesn’t just sit there like a pretty boy in a bar,” she writes. “Forgiveness is the old fat guy you have to haul up the hill”. Devoted readers will enjoy revisiting Strayed’s most memorable and favorite bits of advice, but new readers will also find sagacity in her straightforward yet gentle voice.   

 


 
 

Bacchus

posted by: October 6, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for BacchusEddie Campbell’s Bacchus introduces us to a world where the gods are among us, but can’t quite cover their bar tab. A tragedy some hundred years ago left most of the Greek gods dead, and now Bacchus, the God of Wine and Revelry, is an old man with the “deadest looking face you’ve ever seen,” and the only hints of his former glory are the two horns that occasionally peek out from under his hat before he falls down drunk at the bar. But when he sees his old rival Theseus being interviewed on live television, he gets a taste for the old days and sets out to settle the score.

 

Thus begins one of the most epic shaggy-dog stories ever put to print. Bacchus’ adventures are never what you expect them to be. He’ll set out on a quest, get discouraged, stop somewhere for a drink and then decide to visit the islands instead. It’s less an Odyssey than a pub-crawl through Greek mythology. And at his side is his faithful follower, Simpson, a Greek literature buff whose history lessons fill in the blanks for Bacchus, whose recall isn’t what it used to be (“It’s all a bit of a blur after I invented wine,” says Bacchus, on childhood.)  Along the way they get wrapped up in mob rivalries, the search for the skull of Poseidon and a really weird guy named the Eyeball Kid.

 

Campbell’s detailed artwork and historical knowledge result in a book that’s both highbrow and slapstick, that knows when to be reverent and when to let the drunk god belch. It’s a must read for fans of Alan Moore’s classic From Hell, which Campbell illustrated, or the mythology-dense fiction of Neil Gaiman, whom Campbell also illustrated in The Truth is a Cave in the Black Mountains.

 


 
 

Black Science – Vols. 1-3

posted by: October 1, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Black ScienceCover art for Black ScienceBlack ScienceWith the release of its third volume, the conclusion of the series’ first major story arc, now is the perfect time to catch up on Rick Remender and Matteo Scalera’s pulp sci-fi romp Black Science. Grant McKay and the Anarchist League of Scientists seek the infinite possibilities of the multiverse using the taboo science of interdimensional travel, but things go astray when they discover that “the Pillar,” the device they’ve designed to navigate them through other dimensions, has been tampered with, and is now juggling them between seemingly random alternate realities and parallel dimensions.

 

The inks and colors by Matteo Scalera and Dean White, respectively, are vibrant and full of energy. This spectacular art team transports the reader to fantastical locations: a swampy landscape ravaged by a war between humanoid fish and frogs, a parallel North America where Native Americans have advanced technologically far beyond the rest of the world and a planet inhabited by flying spider-hippos and millipede-like religious fanatics are just a few examples. (It’s exactly as much fun as it sounds.)

 

As action-packed and outlandish as Black Science is, Rick Remender’s strong sense of pacing keeps the drama focused on the characters. In addition to the threats that the group encounters as it tears through the walls of reality, the members also struggle with more personal troubles like handling the responsibilities of parenthood and dealing with the aftermath of infidelity.

 

Those who enjoy Black Science may also want to try Rick Remender and John Romita Jr.’s take on Captain America, which is infused with a similar sci-fi flair.


 
 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Adult