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E-book Exclusives

E-book Exclusives

posted by:
August 4, 2014 - 7:00am

Cover art for Imaginary LinesCover art for Up to MeDid you know that BCPL has a wide range of e-books available to download 24 hours a day? Many popular titles are available in both print and e-book, but there are some titles that are only published as e-books. These fun new romances are available exclusively in e-book.

 

In Allison Parr’s Imaginary Lines, Tamar Rosenfeld fell in love with Abraham Krasner on the dance floor at his bar mitzvah, but she kept her crush a secret through their teenage years. She finally confessed her feelings to him when they were in college...and it didn’t go well. She ignored him for several years, hoping her humiliation would fade. (It hasn’t.) When she moves to New York City for a new job as a sports reporter, Tamar finds herself at odds with Abe, who is now a linebacker for the New York Leopards. Tamar doesn’t count on Abe’s sudden insistence that they are meant to be together. This is a great sports romance that will also appeal to fans of the new adult genre. Abe seems laid back, but his quiet strength will sweep readers away along with Tamar. Parr, who has written two previous novels about Abe’s teammates, is a strong new voice in contemporary romance.

 

Maryland author Christi Barth transports readers to the Finger Lakes region in upstate New York in Up to Me. Ella Mayhew’s entire life has revolved around her family’s resort. It’s entirely out of character when she finds herself falling for Gray Locke, a guest at Mayhew Manor. But Gray has a secret that could spell disaster for their budding romance — he is really there to assess the business as an investment for a company that wants to buy it out. Add to the mix a cast of quirky locals, all of whom are deeply invested in Ella’s happiness, and you have a funny, sweet romance that’s the perfect companion for a lazy summer afternoon.

 

Find out more about BCPL’s e-book collection here. If you need help getting started, visit one of our branches where our staff will be happy to assist you!

Beth

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Remembering the Ladies

Remembering the Ladies

posted by:
August 1, 2014 - 7:00am

Cover art for Dear AbigailWhen the name Abigail Adams is mentioned it generally conjures up an image of an iconic American figure, primarily known as the wife of President John Adams and mother of President John Quincy Adams. However, before she assumed either of these roles, she was a daughter and sister in a very extraordinary family. In Dear Abigail: The Intimate Lives and Revolutionary Ideas of Abigail Adams and Her Two Remarkable Sisters, Diane Jacobs introduces the reader to the woman who became the icon and the family relationships that shaped her.
 

Born the middle of three daughters to William and Elizabeth Quincy Smith of Braintree, Massachusetts, Abigail and her sisters Mary and Elizabeth were clever girls who managed to supplement their limited formal home education by reading any book they could get their hands on. Often using excerpts from the lifelong correspondence between the three sisters, Jacobs has meticulously pieced together the lives of these women in great detail. In an era where women had few legal rights and very few career options outside of wife and mother, Abigail, Mary and Elizabeth aspired to make their voices heard outside their family circle. While Abigail seems to have achieved the most success, her sisters were able to make their marks during the Revolutionary War era and beyond.
 

For those who either think they know the story of Abigail Adams or have enjoyed such books as David McCullough’s biography John Adams or are interested in early American history, this book is a must read. Jacobs is not only a thorough scholar but she has a delightful and engaging narrative style. 

Regina

 
 

Camera Ready

Camera Ready

posted by:
July 31, 2014 - 7:00am

Cover art for Arts & EntertainmentsAuthor Christopher Beha explores the unrealistic nature of reality television and the unintentional consequences of releasing a sex tape in his new novel Arts & Entertainments. Handsome Eddie Hartley hung his dreams on becoming a famous actor after he left high school but didn't have the talent to back it up. Now, working as a drama teacher in the same Catholic high school he attended, he is desperately trying to make ends meet. His wife longs to have a baby, but their only hope lies in an expensive in vitro fertilization procedure that Eddie can ill afford. But when a sleazy media producer comes to him looking for dirt on a now famous ex-girlfriend, Eddie realizes that the old sex tape on his hard drive could be the answer to his prayers.

 

Arts & Entertainments is a contemporary look at today’s media-obsessed culture, and anyone who likes to keep up with the Kardashians will quickly take to this novel. Eddie is a sympathetic anti-hero, not looking for fame but trying to make a quick buck and, although his decisions are rash and never in his best interest, we can’t help but care about him. Eddie’s struggle is monumental. What he had hoped to gain is suddenly lost and he's back at square one. But Eddie never gives up hope and, even at his worst, the reader will continue to cheer him on. Arts & Entertainments is a modern character study that is full of heart and belongs on everyone’s summer reading list.

Doug

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Cooking Up a Good Story

Cooking Up a Good Story

posted by:
July 31, 2014 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Care and Management of LiesJacqueline Winspear, highly respected author of the Maisie Dobbs series, has created a standalone novel based on an unusual premise: the importance of food in a war effort. The Care and Management of Lies is a story of two young British women, Kezia Marchant and Thea Brissenden, friends since early school days, who take very different paths in life. By mid-summer 1914, Kezia can think of nothing else but her imminent marriage to Thea’s brother Tom, who runs the family farm. Thea chooses a life of independence and has embraced the women’s suffrage movement and the peace protestors. While Kezia’s life is ordered and traditional, Thea’s is chaotic and fraught with peril. Kezia embraces her life as a farmer’s wife with rare creativity; while Thea avoids possible prison by responding to a friend’s overtures to join the Ambulance Corps in France.

 

As the war spirals into an entrenched stalemate, Tom reluctantly leaves home to serve his country. Kezia is determined that he not miss a single meal while he is absent. Each evening, she carefully plans her menu of uncommonly original recipes, sets Tom’s place at the table and writes letters filled with descriptions of her creations. While lovingly prepared, these meals are only a product of Kezia’s imagination. Soldier and civilian alike suffer from the blockade that prevents the island nation from successfully feeding its people and army.

 

Winspear has successfully woven a story of civilians and soldiers, friends and enemies, want and plenty.  This is one of many works commemorating the 100th anniversary of the beginning of the War to End All Wars. Fans of Anne Perry’s World War I series and Charles Todd’s works featuring Bess Crawford as a World War I nurse will surely enjoy this original perspective on the subject.

Leanne

 
 

Between the Covers with Michael Olesker

Cover art for Front Stoops in the FiftiesLocal author and news commentator Michael Olesker knows his Baltimore as well as anyone. For a quarter-century, the former News American and Baltimore Sun columnist has captured the changing pulse of the flawed hometown he loves, illuminating countless important issues along the way. Olesker's latest book, Front Stoops in the Fifties: Baltimore Legends Come of Age, is a nostalgic-yet-edgy look back at a time of relative innocence for Baltimore and the country. Join him as he discusses this latest work on Tuesday, August 5 at 7 p.m. at the North Point Branch. The program, the third in the “Dundalk Dialogs” author speaker series, will include a book talk, signing and light refreshments. Recently, the author answered questions for Between the Covers about his new book.   
 

Between the Covers: You have been a longtime chronicler of Baltimore’s history. How did you come up with the idea for this book?
Michael Olesker: I’ve always felt that the assassination of John F. Kennedy was a real dividing line in American politics and culture, as well as the real dividing line between the 1950s and ’60s. We recall the ’50s as an innocent time. We recall the ’60s as a time of social chaos: assassinations, wars, riots, terrific upheaval, some good, some bad, much of it quite difficult. But a lot of the ’60s changes were bubbling just beneath the surface in the ’50s. Several years ago, with the 50th anniversary of the assassination approaching, it occurred to me that quite a few Baltimoreans had a profound effect on the nation’s history, and they’d come of age here in the ’50s. Having grown up here in that era, I’ve always felt a real connection to that time.
 

BTC: You tell the stories of many of Charm City’s personalities, including Nancy Pelosi, Thurgood Marshall and Barry Levinson, coming of age before the complicated 1960s changed the way people looked at themselves and their country. Why were these stories important to share?
MO: As a product of the Baltimore City public school system, I always felt we were taught the Great Man theory of history. That is, presidents and prime ministers and kings change the world. But I think a lot of great change comes from the ground up. Nancy Pelosi’s father was mayor, but her mother ran an army of political women in a time when women were still political non-entities. That was a profound lesson. Thurgood Marshall was the product of a segregated school system and couldn’t get into the University of Maryland Law School because of his skin color. That was a profound motivator as he went on to change the nation’s schools. Barry Levinson was a kid soaking up movie and TV culture and knew that it didn’t reflect the world as he knew it. That was a great motivator for him.
 

Image of Michael OleskerBTC: What made you begin and end with the Kennedy assassination?
MO: My previous book, The Colts’ Baltimore: A City and Its Love Affair in the Fifties, was a 50th anniversary look back at the legendary 1958 Colts who won pro football’s “greatest game ever played.” The response to it was so overwhelmingly heartfelt that the Hopkins Press folks suggested the 50th anniversary of Dallas was another real emotional hook for many people. I wanted to profile not only those people who went on to change the country but the Baltimore of that era — the working class town, the sixth biggest city in the country, the city of neighborhoods and people sitting on front stoops to catch up on the world — but a town on the verge of so many profound changes.
 

BTC: Why did you decide to write in the present tense?
MO: In my mind, the past never entirely goes away — it still flutters around us, still moves the world in ways we don’t always notice. I felt, from the very first sentence I wrote, that the ’50s were still alive and that, by writing in the present tense, I’d give my narrative a greater sense of immediacy.
 

BTC: You write that, for newspapers, the Kennedy assassination signaled the “opening moment of long decades of coughing and wheezing their way out of existence.” You have lived through a lot of changes. Where do you see the news gathering business in 10 or 20 years?
MO: We’re currently in a shaking-out period where even the brightest people haven’t figured out where journalism is heading. What’s become clear to me — from years at newspapers, from years on nightly TV news and from years teaching at one of our local colleges — is that a lot of people don’t have the attention span they once had, nor the patience for long-form reading. They want instant gratification, easily digestible bites of information, and then they move on to the next amusement. Millions of us now live moment-to-moment lifestyles but don’t know the history of the last 10 minutes, much less 10 years. I hope my book is a chance for people to see, in an entertaining way, how we began to get where we are.
 

BTC: Do you think there is any charm left in Charm City?
MO: Absolutely. I think the city’s best years are still ahead of it. Are we losing some of our inimitable “Bawlamer” uniqueness? Sure. But change is always inevitable. What’s shocked all of us is the speed of all this change.

Cynthia

 
 

A Reverie of What Might Have Been

Cover art for The Opposite of LonelinessMarina Keegan was an aspiring essayist, playwright and author of short fiction whose talents were burgeoning before she was killed in a car crash in 2012. She was most renowned for her essay “The Opposite of Loneliness,” which was featured in Yale’s 2012 commencement activities. Through the efforts of her family and friends, Keegan’s works have been assembled as a book, also titled The Opposite of Loneliness, a collection which deserves as much celebration as Keegan herself.

 

Keegan’s fiction is grounded and believable, populated with disarming characters yearning to divulge their intimacies to readers. In “Cold Pastoral,” a girl laments the death of a boyfriend she only recently began dating, and is racked with guilt as she witnesses his ex suffering more than she is. “Challenger Deep,” which portrays a small crew trapped in an unpowered submarine stuck at the bottom of an oceanic trench, is Keegan’s most unsettling, imaginative and beautiful tale.    

 

Keegan’s essays gleam with scholarly poise as she acknowledges the complexities of approaching adulthood with a teenage candor. “Against the Grain” is a reflection on growing up with Celiac’s disease, and the embarrassing safety extremes her mother went to out of love. “Song for the Special” is a gentle reminder of humanity’s diminutive existence in the vast universe we inhabit.

 

What makes The Opposite of Loneliness so wondrous is not its posthumous publication; each piece is brimming with a nearly unattainable blend of worldly presence and youthful hyperbole. It’s so depressing that Keegan’s talents were stifled at such a young age. This collection resonates in reverie of the marvels that would have been.

Tom

 
 

And the RITA Goes To…

And the RITA Goes To…

posted by:
July 29, 2014 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Sweet SpotCover art for No Good DukeCover art for The FirebirdOn July 26, the Romance Writers of America (RWA) closed their annual conference with a gala event where they honored writers among their ranks for their outstanding work. The RITA Awards are given for distinction in romance fiction.

 

The Best First Book RITA went to Laura Drake, who gave up her job as a corporate CFO to pursue a career in writing. Her journey to success wasn’t an easy one. It took her 15 years to sell a book, so receiving the award and a hug from none other than Nora Roberts made the victory even sweeter. Her novel The Sweet Spot is the story of a couple coming back together after their life and marriage are torn apart by tragedy.

 

Sarah MacLean won her second RITA award for her Rules of Scoundrels series. This year, she won the coveted trophy for No Good Duke Goes Unpunished, which I wrote about on Between the Covers earlier this year. The winner in the Paranormal Romance category is Susanna Kearsley for The Firebird. Kearsley skillfully blends history, the paranormal and romance in this novel. Nicola, a woman who secretly has the ability to read past events by touching artifacts, finds herself on a journey through Russia to prove the authenticity of a small wooden bird called the Firebird.

 

We’ve made this list of these winners and many more, so you can read the best romances of the year!

Beth

 
 

The War to End All Wars

Cover art for World War I: The Definitive Visual HistoryCover art for Dark InvasionCover art for The Harlem HellfightersToday marks the 100th anniversary of the outbreak of World War I, the moment that set the history of the rest of the 20th century in motion. Believed at first to be a war that would take weeks or months to settle, the war dragged on for four long, tragic years until the armistice was signed in 1918. Many new titles have been written that bring a better understanding of this period and the catastrophe of the war.

 

R.G. Grant’s World War I: the Definitive Visual History, from Sarajevo to Versailles is a terrific introduction to many facets of the conflict. DK Publishing, partnering with the Smithsonian, brings manageable text and countless period photographs here to best explain the personalities, weapons and cultural artifacts of the time period. In The Long Shadow: The Legacy of the Great War in the Twentieth Century, David Reynolds discusses the ramifications of the war, and rethinks some of the theses that have become too-easy explanations for its causes and results. He also looks at its decades-long impact on the art and literary world and how it brought about Modernism. Howard Blum’s Dark Invasion: 1915: Germany’s Secret War and the Hunt for the First Terrorist Tale in America is a fascinating tale of espionage and intrigue is. New York City and other American cities were targeted by German spies to discourage munitions and other supplies from going across the Atlantic to the Allied forces, long before United States troops became officially embroiled in the conflict itself.

 

Novels set in the time period are perennially popular, such as the Maisie Dobbs mysteries. Now, that series’ author, Jacqueline Winspear, returns with the elegiac and stunning The Care and Management of Lies. Two very different young women come together in the backdrop of the war that has taken away the men in their lives. And Max Brooks’ graphic novel The Harlem Hellfighters is fiction rooted in the heroic tales of the famous African-American 369th Infantry Regiment who fought for France due to antiquated, racially-motivated rules within the American Expeditionary Forces.

Todd

 
 

A World of Absolute Evil

A World of Absolute Evil

posted by:
July 25, 2014 - 8:00am

Cover art for Peter Pan Must DieRetired NYPD homicide detective Dave Gurney was the most successful and highly dedicated officer on the force. After 25 years of chasing the Big Apple’s worst criminals, Dave and his wife retired to an idyllic farm in upstate New York. But Dave’s highly analytical, restlessly roving brain can’t stop working puzzles. Despite the marital discord it causes, Dave is once again drawn down to the world of absolute evil.

 

Gunned down at his mother’s funeral, gubernatorial hopeful Carl Spalter leaves behind a host of people who would gladly see him dead. But it is Mrs. Spalter who is quickly tried, found guilty and sent to prison. Approached by the defense team to break the prosecution’s case and win a new trial, Gurney discovers a crooked cop, a seductive enchantress, a cordial mobster and a peculiar hit man who, because of his appearance, has been dubbed Peter Pan. Not satisfied to simply prove that Mrs. Spalter could not have committed the crime, Gurney won’t stop pulling the string until the entire torturous plot has unraveled, revealing an evil plan more shocking than even the most hardened cop can imagine.

 

Filled with twists and turns, Peter Pan Must Die by John Verdon takes readers on a journey through the minds of the characters and the cold logic of Gurney’s analytical genius. In the end, Gurney discovers not only the shocking truth of the murder, but a few startling truths about himself.
Readers who love Jane Casey, Tana French and John Sandford will find this author’s work deeply satisfying. Original, insightful and thoughtful, John Verdon supplies a truly satisfying read.
 

Leanne

 
 

Save the Date - Twice!

Save the Date - Twice!

posted by:
July 25, 2014 - 8:00am

Cover art for Save the Date Cover art for Save the DateTwo books cordially invite readers to the wild and wonderful world of weddings. Bestselling novelist Mary Kay Andrews and debut memoirist Jen Doll offer different takes on nuptials in each of their new books titled Save the Date. Andrews shares a behind-the-scene look from the florist’s perspective, while Doll explores what she’s learned about life as a frequent guest. Both are stories of young women trying to figure out this love and marriage thing in an ever-changing world.

 

In Andrews’ version, Cara is recently divorced from a philandering husband and has renounced love. But it’s hard to escape as she builds her reputation as one of Savannah’s top wedding florists. She has snared the wedding of the year and, if successful, her career will be cemented, she will be able to pay off her loan to her father and her business will be in the black. But when the bride disappears, Cara’s future looks bleak. Cara pursues the runaway bride and, along the way, is forced to come to grips with her real feelings about love – especially in light of the persistent attentions of sexy, charming Jack Finnerty. Readers will be rooting for the immensely likeable Cara as she chases a bride and finds her dreams.  

 

Doll, an unmarried journalist, has attended dozens of weddings, and each has impacted her in some fashion. From courthouse to destination, with few guests or hundreds, Doll has seen a variety of ceremonies and has a takeaway from each. The entertaining reception stories include confronting an old nemesis and drunkenly melting down. Doll explores the institution of marriage and expresses the normal anxieties of a single person whose friends are tying the knot. It’s also an interesting glimpse at the evolving relationships of a singleton with couples over time. Doll’s exploration of marriage allows her to shed light on society’s changing perceptions of marriage and her own possibility of walking down the aisle.

Maureen