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Why Not Me?

posted by: November 4, 2015 - 6:00am

Cover art for Why Not Me?Mindy Kaling has become a well-known leading lady, writer, director, fashionista and general force to be reckoned with. Because of her show The Mindy Project, we are now on a first name basis with her. Her new collection of essays, Why Not Me?, is just like catching up with an old friend who happens to be doing all of the talking, though we don’t even mind because she is truly that charming. Her essays are hilarious, insightful and even more personal than those in her first book.


She offers up plenty of celebrity stories with the likes of Bradley Cooper, Reese Witherspoon and even President Barack Obama. However, she is always completely relatable. Her response to fame, and the unique situations she finds herself in because of her fame, is exactly what you or I would think if we were suddenly “a little bit famous.”


In this collection, Kaling addresses questions she didn’t feel prepared to tackle before, like being asked how she maintains her confidence by a young woman who had lost her own. Kaling confesses that she didn’t have an answer at the time, but now she does. Her secret is hard work — 19-hour-day kind of hard work.


There is an entire essay in which the author imagines her alternate life as a Latin teacher at a private high school in New York, told to us through email correspondence. It was delightful. I would read an entire book about alternate Mindy. I also hope this potential book gets turned into a movie starring Mindy.


For die-hard fans, it's worth it to check out both the book and the audio book because each contain extras that the other does not. The book has many great pictures, including an entire “Day in the Life” segment. However, the essays truly come to life when delivered by the author in the audio version. She has perfect comedic timing and obviously the best delivery of her own jokes.


Readers who enjoy this book will love her first essay collection Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? (And Other Concerns), Yes Please by Amy Poehler and You’re Never Weird on the Internet (Almost) by Felicia Day.



Food Whore: A Novel of Dining and Deceit

posted by: November 3, 2015 - 6:00am

Cover art for Food WhoreFood whore: a person willing to do anything for food.

In her debut novel, Food Whore: A Novel of Dining and Deceit, Jessica Tom tells the mesmerizing tale of one such food whore, Tia Monroe. An aspiring food writer, Tia believes she can ascend to the top of New York’s cutthroat food world, where being the next big thing is achieved at any cost.  

Tia hopes to begin her ascension by securing an internship with famed cookbook writer, Helen Lansky. But fate has a different plan. She crosses paths with Michael Saltz, the anonymous and powerful New York Times food critic who has a big secret. He has lost his sense of taste. He convinces Tia to ghostwrite his reviews and, in return, she is provided with designer clothes, access to four-star restaurants and the coveted internship with Lansky. But no one can know of their partnership. She believes this is a small price to pay to achieve her dream.  After all, she will be working in the exclusive world of four-star restaurants and celebrity chefs, making unbelievable connections. Any grad student would kill for such unprecedented access. But Tia soon realizes that real connections are difficult to make when you have a secret. Will she keep her integrity while achieving her dream? Or, like so many before her, will she become just another casualty of the New York dining scene?

If you like both deception and true-to-life characters, Food Whore will keep you hooked to the very end. Clearly, dining and deceit do make great fiction.

For a true, no-holds-barred, hilarious account of New York’s restaurant world, try Anthony Bourdain’s memoir, Kitchen Confidential.



The Unfortunate Decisions of Dahlia Moss

posted by: November 2, 2015 - 6:00am

Cover art for The Unfortunate Decisions of Dahlia Moss by Max WirestoneThe Unfortunate Decisions of Dahlia Moss have resulted in a familiar premise in this debut novel by Max Wirestone: Girl graduates from college with crippling debt and zero job prospects. Girl’s boyfriend has left her for another woman, forcing her to mooch room and board off the kindness of a friend.


But then Dahlia is randomly offered a lucrative job as a private detective. All she has to do is find and recover a virtual sword stolen in a video game. She is given the suspected culprit’s name, the time he will be meeting her for dinner and the assurance that he will turn over the sword. Dahlia Moss is no seasoned PI, but this sounds like easy money.


Of course the job ends up being more complicated than expected, especially after the man who hired her turns up dead—impaled by a real-life replica of the stolen sword. And he still owes her $1,000! Dahlia can’t help but wonder who killed him… and why did he even hire her in the first place? Soon Dahlia finds herself investigating multiple mysteries and enduring uncomfortable encounters with homicide detectives, the dead man’s former friends and guild mates, not to mention her own ex-boyfriend.


Fans of The Big Bang Theory and The Guild will enjoy the MMORPG setting and the nerdy humor. A former librarian, Wirestone got the idea for the Dahlia Moss series after noticing that many of his geeky customers were also his mystery lovers. He has created a lovable, unexpected heroine in Dahlia Moss. She is funny, she is sassy, she is an amateur Veronica Mars in a Jigglypuff hat.


Witches of America

posted by: October 29, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Witches of America by Alex MarWitches of America is in some ways the antithesis to other spiritual narratives that have been popular recently, such as Unorthodox by Deborah Feldman, which focus on practitioners reinventing themselves outside of their respective religions. It is author Alex Mar’s narrative as she investigates Pagan worship in contemporary American society, first as a documentarian for her film American Mystic, which profiles different practitioners of alternative religions, and then as an initiate into the Feri, a self-decribed “sex cult,” struggling against her inherent skepticism and upbringing as an atheist to experience transcendence for herself.


While Mar has a down-to-earth attitude in the face of mysticism that many readers will relate to, she is also honest about her biases and attempts to approach the weird without judgment. In spite of the sensationalism the subject matter inherently conjures up, her exploration reveals how practicing Pagans are seeking answers to questions all spiritual people ask, including what it means to have a higher calling and what actions it takes to live a “good” life. As an investigator, Mar comes across as a sympathetic interlocutor, actively trying to immerse herself in a society that is extremely conscious of its outsider status and protective of what that status entails. As she puts it, “Groucho Marx would have understood the witches: their clubs do not necessarily want you as a member.” The results of her mining are revealed in her personal development and include several thoughtful observations regarding skepticism and faith.




Alphabet Books: Not Just for Toddlers

posted by: October 28, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Rad American Women A-Z by Kate SchatzCover art for A to Z Great Modern Artists by Andy TuohyWriter Kate Schatz and artist Miriam Klein Stahl pair up to make their wonderfully colorful and informative book Rad American Women A-Z. Each woman gets a two-page spread with a graphic illustrated portrait and a few easy-to-read paragraphs. There are a myriad of different women including actresses, artists, scientists and activists. In addition to showing a variety of careers, Schatz and Stahl feature women with different socioeconomic backgrounds, races, ages, gender identifications and disabilities. Notable features include Kate Bornstein, a transgender writer and performance artist, “who reminds us to bravely claim our true identity,” and Temple Grandin, an autistic animal science professor, “who shows us the power of a brilliant mind.” Although the text is written at a fifth-grade level, the women featured can be shared with any age group, from kindergartners to adults.


A to Z Great Modern Artists, drawn by Andy Tuohy and with text by Christopher Masters, is the kind of aesthetically pleasing book to have on your coffee table for when you want to get absorbed into something interesting but don’t quite feel like engaging yourself in a novel or magazine. Each featured artist has a portrait drawn by Andy Tuohy that replicates the style of that artist—Piet Mondrian’s portrait is drawn in the signature geometric style of his artwork, while Andy Warhol’s portrait is done in his famous pop-art style. In addition to Tuohy’s creative portraits, each letter of the alphabet feels like its own exhibit and includes notable works of art from the featured artists. You’ll want to move through the book slowly, like you would when walking through an art museum, in order to fully appreciate all of the nuances of Tuohy’s creative design.



posted by: October 27, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for 1944 by Jay WinikJay Winik chronicles the final push toward a WWII victory in 1944: FDR and Year That Changed History. By 1944, the Allies expected to win the war. There were no illusions: They knew the terrible cost it would entail. Franklin Delano Roosevelt maintained a coalition of contentious rivals who, in ordinary times, would have been natural enemies. Roosevelt faced some of the biggest challenges in our history: a struggling economy that threatened our democracy, an isolationist sentiment that shunned foreign involvement and the insatiable greed of fascism as it gobbled up country after country. All the while, the presidency took its toll on his health. FDR was clearly dying.


The book also discusses the atrocities being committed to Jews. The dread of Jewish families as the full meaning of their plight is understood is heartbreaking. The detailed account of the escape of two Jewish men from Auschwitz is taut and gripping.


Winik skips back and forth through the era, documenting events in 1944 and then backtracking to FDR’s political rise. Winik indicts FDR and his administration for failing to take direct action against the Nazis’ diabolical “Final Solution.” Historians have long debated whether Roosevelt could have done more militarily to disrupt or alleviate the Holocaust. His choice to concentrate on winning the war will remain controversial.


Jay Winik is a respected historian and his writing well executed. He is the author of New York Times bestselling April 1865 and The Great Upheaval. World War II enthusiasts will enjoy the backseat view of a beleaguered president as he maneuvers through the minefields of war and politics.



posted by: October 26, 2015 - 7:00am

Armada coverEver wished life was more like a video game, where you could save the world with your friends and triumph over evil alien invaders? Ever wanted to be the hero, making all the right choices and saving the day?


Ever thought that maybe, just maybe, there’s more to the story than the player gets to know?


Ernest Cline brings his pop culture-referencing, video game-playing and '80s nostalgia-inducing strengths to his second novel Armada. Following the success of his first novel Ready Player One, Cline’s newest hero is Zack Lightman, a senior in high school who holds the ranking of sixth best player in the video game Armada. Armada’s gameplay consists of defending the Earth from attacking alien forces; during missions players control drones instead of flying a manned flight suit. Outside of playing Armada, Zack has no direction in life and little interest in the outside world. He does enjoy listening to music and reading the journals his father left behind when he died. The journals detail his father’s conspiracy theory – all of the popular science fiction movies and video games over the past couple of decades are preparing humanity for an inevitable confrontation with an alien race. The video games in particular are being used to train gamers for future combat.


Zack thinks this all sounds rather far-fetched until the day he spots a spaceship hovering over his school. A spaceship that looks like one of the enemy alien ships in Armada. Suddenly everything Zack knew about reality has changed, and he’s whisked off to a secret government base to take part in defending Earth from the Europans, an alien species set on the destruction of humanity. And he’s thrilled, in a sense, because it’s exciting to be called upon to defend Earth. Except for the niggling voice in the back of Zack’s head that thinks the Europans are acting a little too much like a scripted video game villain. That maybe things aren’t as they seem, or as Zack’s commanding officers think they seem. But what can one video gamer do?


Armada blends the classic coming-of-age story with an alien invasion packed with action and thrills. While not as strong of a storyline as Ready Player One, Cline’s use of pop culture still provides plenty of chuckles. His action scenes make this a good book for any science fiction or video game fan.


This is Your Life, Harriet Chance!

posted by: October 26, 2015 - 7:00am

JThis is Your Life, Harriet Chance! coveronathan Evison’s new novel This Is Your Life, Harriet Chance! introduces our heroine Harriet on the day she is born, and through shifting narration and flashbacks, tells us of her life story. Using the format of the popular 1950s game show This Is Your Life, we meet all the characters and memories that have shaped Harriet’s existence. By all appearances, she has played it safe: a husband, housework, children and a couple of close friends. So when she discovers that her late husband bid on and won an Alaskan cruise at a silent auction, she decides to go ahead and have the adventure on her own at age 78.


On the cruise, she gets much more than she bargained for: the reappearing ghost of her husband, her estranged daughter showing up to share her cabin and a letter that reveals that so many parts of her life were never what they seemed to be.


The lighthearted and shifting narration isn’t just a fun ride of a novel (at parts, it really is), it is a complex and deeply moving look at a flawed, earnest character finally trying to come to terms with what has been her life. Even though one chapter is set in present day and the next may be set in 1954, Harriet is very much a product of her age. She gives up on her dream of being a lawyer to settle down with her husband, Bernard. She spends all her time and energy on the house and their children. She becomes Bernard’s sole caregiver as he battles Alzheimer’s at the end of his life. She makes many mistakes in the process. Through the replay of the good times (which are few) and the not-so-good times (which are many), it is impressive that Harriet is still searching for a positive outcome.


At its heart, This Is Your Life, Harriet Chance! is a novel about relationships and the choices we make to keep those relationships going, especially our relationship with ourselves. A great choice for book clubs, this novel will resonate with fans of Karen Joy Fowler’s We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves and Meg Wolitzer’s The Interestings.



Big Magic

posted by: October 22, 2015 - 7:00am

Big Magic coverIf you’re an artist of any kind, if you aspire to live a life driven by curiosity, if you believe that inspiration and creativity are literal magic, then you will find a kindred spirit in Elizabeth Gilbert, author of Big Magic: Creative Living Beyond Fear.


Gilbert is best known for her 2006 memoir Eat, Pray, Love about her life-changing travels to Italy, India and Indonesia. But Gilbert advises that it’s not necessary to pack up and travel the world for the sake of your art—you can and should make room for creativity and magic in your everyday life, and Big Magic provides the roadmap. She also warns against putting unnecessary pressure on your creativity or burdening it by asking it to financially support you. This advice could feel inauthentic coming from a writer who does support herself with her art, but Gilbert is so earnest in her beliefs, it’s impossible to begrudge her success.


Instead of advocating fearlessness, Gilbert says that we should allow plenty of room for our fear, but realize that it should not control our creative lives. She also dismisses the popular stereotype of the tormented artist. Instead, she suggests that your work should be a positive collaboration between you and your creativity. Gilbert theorizes that ideas are incorporeal entities longing to be brought into existence and that if we aren’t receptive to them, they will knock at the next artist’s door. She relates an anecdote about a novel she failed to write, only to discover years later that a very similar idea had magically found Ann Patchett.


After writing Big Magic, Gilbert didn’t feel like she was finished with the subject of creativity and began a podcast called Magic Lessons where she and guests, including Patchett and Cheryl Strayed counsel writers and artists who are having issues in their creative lives.


Beautifully written and full of fresh ideas on the nature of creativity, Big Magic is sure to become recommended reading along with classics like Julia Cameron’s The Artist’s Way and Anne Lamott’s Bird by Bird.



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