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Librarians

As Time Goes By in Charm City

Lost Baltimore cover artLost Baltimore by Gregory Alexander and Paul Williams pays homage to vanishing icons from the landscape of Baltimore’s past. Emphasis is on bygone buildings, but the authors also remember professional sports teams and businesses which left the city and impacted the livelihood of many denizens of Charm City. While tourists and residents see the Inner Harbor as the jewel in Baltimore’s crown and enjoy updated sports’ venues, this book sheds light on the dramatic changes to its skyline in just the past 150 years.  
 

The authors start in 1860 with the demolition of the First Presbyterian Church and continue through today with the virtual disappearance of arabbers in the city. Detailed text and rich images bring Baltimore’s past to life in this engaging coffee table page-turner. Mention is made of the Great Baltimore Fire of 1904 which destroyed so many buildings, lives and, indeed, the layout of the city. But the authors are careful to look at all aspects of life in Baltimore which have changed over the years. Enjoy reminiscing about cherished sports teams — the Baltimore Bullets left in 1973, followed by the Baltimore Colts a decade later. And whatever happened to the mysterious Poe Toaster whose annual visits ceased in 2009? It is the disappearing industries which have had the most impact on Charm City and its changing population. Major businesses which have left or are now defunct include the Baltimore Shipyards (1984), McCormick Spice plant (1989), Hutzler’s (1990) and Bethlehem Steel plant at Sparrows Point (2012).
 

This fascinating look at our city sheds light on societal changes and the evolution of Baltimore from a manufacturing and shipping capital to tourist and business center. Paging through this entertaining and informative book allows readers to step back and enjoy the Baltimore of old.

Maureen

 
 

The Dogs of Yore

Medieval Dogs cover artBritish historian Kathleen Walker-Meikle collects centuries-old examples of canine representation in her succinct but illuminating work Medieval Dogs, published by the British Library. While there has been considerable research into the earliest beginnings of the human/canine relationship, and countless looks into how dogs and people complement each other today, it is fascinating to look at the ways dogs were portrayed in what is considered to be a less enlightened historical time.
 

Brilliantly illustrated and well captioned manuscripts and paintings from around Europe are featured, along with brief but telling text. The pre-Renaissance art, without linear perspective, speaks to a bygone age. Stories of how dogs were part of abbey life among monks and nuns show a push/pull acceptance of the animals. In some cases, dogs were happily allowed to run free throughout abbeys, while in other cases, they were more grudgingly permitted — aside from sanctuaries and dining areas. As with medical treatment for humans, veterinary skills during the medieval years were basic and often fraught with suggestions that are chilling today. It's surprising to see how many breeds from our era, such as Greyhounds, terriers and spaniels, were already classified as early as the 16th century.
 

Loyalty is shown in many drawings of canines that remained with their fallen masters after a battle. Representations of the dogs in these and other illustrations (such as the many lapdogs depicted in royal settings) show how people of the period valued their animal companions. While rampant superstition during medieval times did not always portray dogs in the best light, their frequent appearances within the art and manuscripts of the period show the evolution of the human/dog relationship to what it now has become.

Todd

 
 

Hollywood Heist

Hollywood Heist

posted by:
August 27, 2013 - 7:00am

Cover Art for the Bling RingThe group that the L.A. Times dubbed “The Bling Ring” was an unlikely band of seven privileged, fame-obsessed teenage thieves who gained entry into multiple celebrity homes in 2008 and 2009 using information that was widely available online. Perhaps the most astonishing part of their crime spree was how long they were able to get away with it and how easy it really was. Entertainment journalist Nancy Jo Sales brings us the full story in The Bling Ring: How a Gang of Fame-Obsessed Teens Ripped off Hollywood and Shocked the World.
 

Sales first published the story in a 2010 Vanity Fair article titled “The Suspect Wore Louboutins.” It is now expanded in this in-depth exposé. The thieves monitored their victims’ whereabouts using social media posts and websites like TMZ. They found the celebrities’ mansions using Google maps and a website mapping locations of celebrity houses. When they went to the victims’ homes, they found that many of the houses were unlocked or that the alarm systems were disabled, making it simple for them to enter the homes and take whatever they wanted. They stole about $3 million worth of clothing, jewelry and other property over the course of a year. The list of their victims is a who’s who of young Hollywood stars, including Lindsay Lohan, Rachel Bilson, Audrina Patridge and Orlando Bloom. They reportedly broke into Paris Hilton’s house multiple times before they were apprehended.
 

The group’s crimes inspired the film, The Bling Ring, starring Emma Watson and written and directed by Sofia Coppola, available on DVD in September.

Beth

 
 

Turning Over a Not-So-New Leaf

Turning Over a Not-So-New Leaf

posted by:
August 26, 2013 - 7:55am

Cover art for Kale: The Complete GuideCover art for Fifty Shades of KaleAfter years of being relegated to uses as a soup green or worse, a plate garnish, kale has made a stunning comeback in the past few years. Darling of the dietary world, it frequently ranks near or at the top of the best foods for optimal nutritional impact and is thus often referred to as a “superfood.” Two new cookbooks focus on ways to use kale to maximum effect. The more no-nonsense of the pair, Kale: The Complete Guide to the World’s Most Powerful Superfood by Stephanie Pedersen, contains over 70 recipes divided into categories such as beverages, ways to incorporate kale into breakfast, lunch, snacks and even desserts that feature this bittersweet green. A helpful introductory section covers the types of the vegetable, techniques for selecting kale and its many nutritional benefits.

 

A more whimsical but no less informative cookbook is Fifty Shades of Kale: 50 Fresh and Satisfying Recipes That Are Bound to Please by Drew Ramsey and Jennifer Iserloh. Beautiful photographs of the many varieties of kale and the mouthwatering recipes themselves add to the allure. Mild winks to the book series the title references are included, but do not get in the way of the text or food. Appealing ideas such as kale and kiwi gazpacho; a warm kale salad with beets and ginger; and even chocolate chip kale cookies incorporate this newly rediscovered gem into contemporary recipes. One of the resources listed at the close of the book, thekaleproject.com, contains more recipes and assorted information to satisfy your “green tooth.”

Todd

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Light for All

Cover art for Second SunsDavid Oliver Relin did not live long enough to witness the publication of his new book, Second Suns: Two Doctors and Their Amazing Quest to Restore Sight and Save Lives. It is a top-notch, inspiring account of two brilliant physicians from opposite ends of the world, one a Harvard-educated adrenaline junkie from America, and the other a disciplined trader's son from a remote Nepalese village. The unlikely duo combine their generous talents for one lofty goal: to cure preventable blindness. In 1995, they founded the Himalayan Cataract Project as a way to treat thousands of impoverished Himalayans in that isolated, mountainous region.

 

For ophthalmologists Geoffrey Tabin and Sanduk Ruit, the means to an end seemed simple yet difficult. In developing countries, cataracts are the leading cause of preventable blindness among the poor, including children. In wealthy countries, it is a common and treatable ailment of the elderly.  "Some conditions of existence are more painful than others," Ruit tells Relin. Ruit would know; growing up, the nearest doctor was a six-day-walk away. He watched as his siblings died of curable illnesses.

 

Relin transports readers to Ruit's temporary eye hospital, formerly a filthy military post in the village of Kalikasthan, where young and old shuffle in from scorching heat to have red-brown dust scrubbed from their faces. The high energy Tabin, who early on abandoned a medical career to pursue athletic passions, was inspired by Ruit. Together, their respective stories led the dynamic pair to their calling. Thousands have been cured with their simple surgery that costs a mere pittance.

 

Relin, who co-authored the now controversial bestseller Three Cups of Tea with Greg Mortenson, committed suicide in November 2012. In telling this compelling and hopeful story of two medical pioneers, the author was not immune to the poignancy of what he was witnessing. When an elegant 56-year-old seamstress, who was forced to sell her sewing machine, finally sees again, Relin thrust into her hands a wad of bills. "For a sewing machine," he said.

Cynthia

 
 

Bad Medicine

Bad Medicine

posted by:
August 16, 2013 - 7:00am

The Good Nurse: A True Story of Medicine, Madness, and MurderSomething very wrong was happening to patients at various hospitals in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Mysterious deaths and a higher than usual number of unexplained incidents followed nurse Charlie Cullen as he hopscotched from one hospital to the next. In The Good Nurse: A True Story of Medicine, Madness, and Murder, Charles Graeber relays a chilling, true crime account of a board-certified nurse who killed an unknown number of the hospitals’ most vulnerable patients over the span of 16 years. More disturbing was the hospitals’ handling of it. Although Cullen had been dismissed or summarily fired from jobs, he never seemed to have problems finding another position. Fearful of appearing incompetent or risking internal investigation, hospitals did not report missing drugs or unusual deaths. Cullen was often allowed to resign with the promise that incidents would not show up on his record. Even when police investigators became involved in 2003, one of the hospitals blatantly lied about their ability to access data showing which drugs were requested by which nurses. 

 

The Good Nurse is the result of six years of research by Graeber, including interviews with a now- imprisoned Cullen. Through these interviews, plus police records and court documents, Graeber reconstructs Cullen’s violent family history and the convoluted methods he used to manipulate the hospitals’ drug-dispensing systems in order to kill patients with overdoses. He gives readers insight into a complex man who could just as easily build rapport with co-workers and woo women as he could mercilessly kill the sick and infirm. The total number of victims will never be known, although Graeber describes him as “perhaps the most prolific serial killer in American history,” with estimates as high as 300 deaths. True crime and medical thriller readers shouldn’t miss this story of a “good nurse” with deadly intentions, and the detectives who were in a race against time to arrest him before he killed again.

Melanie

 
 

Sex and Drugs and a Flying Trapeze

Queen of the AirWhat You Want Is in the LimoDavid Bowie sang “fame puts you there where things are hollow.” Two new books take a close look at superstar entertainers separated by decades, yet the perks and consequences of fame seem to remain the same. Queen of the Air: A True Story of Love and Tragedy at the Circus by Dean Jensen is the true story of circus aerialist phenom Leitzel Pelikan who rose to international stardom at the dawn of the 20th century. Author Michael Walker looks to the music scene in What You Want Is in the Limo: On the Road with Led Zeppelin, Alice Cooper and The Who in 1973, the Year the Sixties Died and the Modern Rock Star Was Born.

 

The Pelikan’s small family circus had fallen on hard times, and crippled patriarch Eduard was forced to “apprentice” his talented 12-year-old daughter Nellie to Willy Dosta’s traveling troupe in order to feed his family. Nellie, an accomplished acrobat and flyer herself, returned within a year and gave birth to baby Leitzel in 1891. Nellie left her baby in the care of her parents while she trained, traveled and eventually found renown under the tutelage of Edward Leamy. Petite Leitzel showed a gift for the trapeze and Roman rings and soon outshone her mother under the big top. So famous that she was known simply as Leitzel, she commanded a private car in the Ringling Brothers circus train, enjoyed legions of admirers and suitors, and was married several times including to her male trapeze counterpart, Alfredo Codona. Queen of the Air is not only a biography of a legendary aerialist, it is a behind the scenes view of the celebrity and circus life of an earlier time.

 

Walker’s title says it all; his premise is that 1973 marked a year of intense road tours for “every major act of the era” which ushered in the real ’70s, changing the hippie-ish peace and love culture of the ’60s to a harsher reality of big money, scads of friendly groupies and an unending assortment of illicit substances. Walker tracks the travels and travails of The Who, Led Zeppelin and Alice Cooper whose skyrocketing stars and bulging coffers are directly proportional to the indulgence of their dissolute behaviors. 1973 marked the year of outrageous contract demands, powerful and massive customized sound systems and no-holds-barred stage shows. What You Want Is in the Limo will be enjoyed by anyone who ever held a transistor radio to their ear.

Lori

 
 

Through Thick and Through Thin

A Street Cat Named BobWhen James and Bob first met, both were at low points in their lives. James, a London street musician and recovering drug addict, was living hand-to-mouth, barely making enough money to eat and keep a roof over his head. Bob, a flea-ridden, bedraggled orange tabby, was malnourished and injured. Recognizing a fellow kindred spirit in need, James began to nurse Bob back to health, forming a special bond between them. Their uplifting story is chronicled in James Bowen’s memoir A Street Cat Named Bob: And How He Saved My Life.

 

It’s quickly apparent to James that Bob is far from a typical cat. Easygoing and fiercely affectionate, he prefers toileting outside every morning to using a litter box. And much like a dog, he follows James on his route to the bus, although he also enjoys riding draped across his shoulders. James allows Bob to accompany him to his usual busking spot in Covent Garden. Using a combination of a makeshift shoelace “leash” and the shoulder-carry method, he navigates the ginger feline though busy traffic. He takes out his acoustic guitar and soon Bob is contentedly curled up inside the case. James immediately discovers that his unusual cat draws a lot of favorable tourist attention, and together they take in as much money in an hour as James usually makes solo in a day.

 

There are some pitfalls along the way, but James and Bob continue to be more than just pet and owner. James is astonished to find out that they are famous abroad, thanks to videos posted by tourists on YouTube. Readers who enjoyed Dewey: The Small-Town Library Cat Who Touched the World or Homer’s Odyssey: A Fearless Feline Tale, or How I Learned about Love and Life with a Blind Wonder Cat will breeze through this heartwarming, inspirational book.

Paula G.

 
 

Witness to History

The Butler A Witness to History Wil HaygoodAs the 2008 presidential election neared, Washington Post reporter Wil Haygood wanted to write about the life of someone who had worked in the White House and lived through the civil rights movement. He wanted the story to reflect what this historic moment would mean to that person. His search for the perfect subject led him to Eugene Allen, a man who served as White House butler for 34 years. His time working in the White House spanned eight presidential administrations, from Truman to Reagan. Haygood’s article about Allen’s life, “A Butler Well Served by This Election,” was the inspiration for Lee Daniels’ The Butler, a movie coming to theaters in August. In honor of the movie’s release, Haygood’s article is expanded in a new book called The Butler: A Witness to History, which acts as a companion to the film. It brings audiences both the real story of Eugene Allen and a behind-the-scenes look at the making of the film.

 

Allen began working at the White House in 1952 as a pantry man, washing dishes and shining silver, but he was later promoted to butler. He witnessed many significant moments in our nation’s history while he was working in the background. He was there when Eisenhower was on the phone with the Arkansas governor during the Little Rock school desegregation crisis. He was at the White House on the day that President Kennedy was assassinated. Haygood brings readers Allen’s unique perspective on the presidents and the events that shaped the 20th century.

 

Although the film is largely fictionalized, director Lee Daniels writes that it does also include some real moments from Allen’s extraordinary life. The movie’s A-list cast includes Forest Whitaker, Oprah Winfrey, Robin Williams, John Cusack, Cuba Gooding Jr. and Terrence Howard. Lee Daniels’ The Butler premieres in theaters on August 16, but you can get a sneak peak here.

 

 

Beth

 
 

Summer's Best Flavors

Summer's Best Flavors

posted by:
July 18, 2013 - 7:55am

Cover art for Home Made SummerCover art for Fresh Happy TastyCover art for The Grilling BookCookouts and farmers’ markets abound in summer, making it an exciting time of year for foodies. These three bright, beautiful cookbooks bring together the best tastes of summer with plenty of fresh ingredients and grilling.

 

Home Made Summer, the latest entry in Yvette Van Boven’s Home Made series, is filled with fabulous, sun-drenched food. Each recipe includes step-by-step instructions and beautiful photographs.  Recipes like Éclairs with Lavender Filling, Mango and Cilantro Iced Tea, Crab Cakes with Fresh Citrus-Tomato Mayonnaise, and Prosecco and Elderflower Jelly with Melon are luscious and tempting. The recipes are sophisticated but not fussy, and Van Boven really makes the most of the fresh produce that summer provides.

 

Personal chef Jane Coxwell loves to cook with fresh ingredients and light flavors, making her recipes perfect for summer. In 2009, she began working as a personal chef aboard fashion icon Diane Von Furstenberg’s yacht. Coxwell’s new cookbook Fresh Happy Tasty: An Adventure in 100 Recipes brings together beautiful photographs and accessible recipes inspired by her travels. With healthy, fresh recipes like Middle Eastern Watermelon Salad, Israeli Couscous with Shrimp and Zucchini, and Chicken and Beef Koftas, Coxwell’s food, featuring her own unique culinary style and its global inspiration, is fun and inspiring.

 

For inspiration for your next summer cookout, look no further than The Grilling Book: The Definitive Guide from Bon Appétit, edited by Adam Rapoport. This complete guide to grilling covers all of the basics, but it also provides inspiration for to explore more unique flavors. Recipes like Chicken Skewers with Coriander Marinade and Lemon Salsa, Bombay Sliders with Garlic Curry Sauce, Best-Ever Barbecued Ribs, and Stone Fruit Slaw will take your cookout far beyond the traditional hamburgers and hotdogs.
 

Beth

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