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The Lost Art of Reading Nature's Signs

posted by: December 9, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Lost Art of Reading Nature's SignsThe Lost Art of Reading Nature’s Signs is the output of more than two decades of Tristan Gooley’s experience being in tune with the land and helping others learn to do the same. Sometimes I question Gooley’s sense — like when he gets himself lost in an abandoned underground slate mine — but I cannot question his fortitude or his know-how. When stuck in the aforementioned abandoned slate mine, he was resourceful and used the “dip” of the rocks underground to find his way. For those with no idea what “dip” is, or how to use it, he explains in a way that anyone can understand. Obviously, he found his way out, or he would not have been able to write this book. His techniques must work.

 

Lost Art is at times laugh out loud funny, but Gooley has all the gravitas of any scientist when he is explaining the finer points of how not to die in the wild — even something as simple as figuring out how to tell when approaching civilization. He explains all of his how not to die lessons in language that is easy to understand and fun to read. His love for the wonders of the world around him bleeds through the page. Soon, the reader will be locating tracks of mice and deer, and they, too, will feel his passion for the glory of the natural world.

 

This book is a must for any fan of the outdoors. Gooley’s passion for wonder and knowledge is infectious. Also look out for his previous book, The Natural Navigator, in which Gooley explains how to find one’s way just by using the world around them. 
 


 
 

HAPPY 100TH Birthday, Frank Sinatra!

posted by: December 8, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Sinatra the ChairmanDecember 12 marks the 100th anniversary of Frank Sinatra’s birth, and three new books celebrate his legacy. Ol’ Blue Eyes remains an iconic figure in American culture with his mystique enduring long after his death in 1998.

 

Sinatra the Chairman by James Kaplan is a detailed examination of the life and career of this legendary performer. By delving into his complex relationships and prolific career, Kaplan exposes the multi-faceted layers that made this man —singer, actor, mogul, friend and lover. This is the follow-up to 2010’s Frank: The Voice and picks up in 1954, after Sinatra won an Academy Award and was firmly re-entrenched as a top selling recording artist.Cover art for Why Sinatra Matters

 

Award-winning author Pete Hamill’s Why Sinatra Matters was first published in 1999 and is being re-issued in time for the anniversary of Sinatra’s birth, along with a new introduction from the author. This book serves as both a unique homage and an insightful portrait of a complex man. Hamill’s beautifully written portrait brings to life a man whose entertaining touched so many generations. 

 

Cover art for Frank & Ava: in Love and WarFrank & Ava: In Love and War by John Brady fully explores this volatile relationship which shaped both their lives. Ava had two short-lived marriages behind her and a succession of high profile suitors when she and Frank met. The spark was instantaneous and the two began a tempestuous affair, despite Frank’s marriage which ended soon after in divorce. Frank and Ava’s subsequent marriage was a series of fights, separations and reconciliations which ultimately ended in divorce. Despite the not-so-happy ending, Brady’s exploration of this glamorous couple is compelling. Gossip columnist Liz Smith said of this duo, "If I had to go back in Hollywood history and name two people who were most desperately and passionately in love with each other, I would say Frank Sinatra and Ava Gardner were it." 

 

Want more? Check out this list of music, movies and more books featuring the Chairman of the Board.
 


 
 

Deep South

posted by: December 2, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Deep SouthVeteran novelist and travel writer Paul Theroux has spent 50 years traversing the globe. In his latest book, Deep South: Four Seasons on Back Roads, he trades the rickety rail cars of his African and Asian adventures for the dusty, sunbaked, story-rich rural back roads of Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Arkansas and South Carolina. He calls it a “coming and going” type of book that beckoned him to return time and again. Indeed, he spent over a year and a half traveling by car in the south where only one person had ever heard his name or read any of his previous books. “Anonymity is freedom,” he said.

 

Theroux provides an intensely evocative look at the complex history of a region, rich in so many ways, abandoned and scarred in others. This is not a story about romantic cobblestone streets, touristy historic districts and prosperous cities. It is about what happens when manufacturing plants close up. It is about the shocking disparity of aid to places where the poverty rivals third world countries. Theroux searched out the cohesive fabric of the region and had hundreds of encounters with those who shared beloved interests, like gun shows, church-going and football. He frequented barber shops for conversations. He explored southern literary voices to understand history.

 

Known for an eye for detail and local color, Theroux is at his best trying to capture the mood of the places he visited. He does make assumptions in this thought-provoking, dialect-rich narrative that may leave readers asking questions or even shaking their heads. In the end, this 464-page travelogue by the author of the classic The Great Railway Bazaar may have readers wondering whether Theroux’s South is a place they recognize.

 


 
 

You Don’t Have to Like Me

posted by: December 1, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for You Don't Have to Like MeAlida Nugent is a writer, blogger, and self-proclaimed feminist. However, her journey to feminism has not always been easy. Nugent shares her shrewd observations and humorous personal anecdotes on how she came to claim her feminism in her newest book, You Don’t Have to Like Me.

 

Nugent’s book is both a memoir and a collection of essays. Each essay shows how feminism has had an important part in shaping her life, from the moments before she was born and her parents found out they were having a girl to the present day as she navigates life as a 20-something writer. Nugent admits that she was reluctant to label herself as a feminist, and that she understands that it’s difficult for other girls to label themselves as feminists because of the negative stigma surrounding the word. But as Nugent says, “Feminism isn’t wrong. Feminism is important.”

 

Nugent’s book helps readers understand that “feminism” is not a scary word, and remains just as relevant today as it did 50 or even 100 years ago. Although we are making strides towards gender equality, the fact that labeling oneself as a supporter of gender equality has negative connotations shows that we are still quite far from where we need to be. Nugent’s essays capture the sobering truths of women’s inequality with passion and relatability.

 

Readers will laugh out loud at the absurdity of some of the situations Nugent has found herself in, and then realize that the absurdity is not in the situation, but at our misunderstanding of how much we truly need feminism in our everyday lives. Nugent’s writing is approachable and entertaining and gives young adult readers the fresh perspective on modern-day feminism they need. For more of Alida Nugent’s writing, check out her previous book, Don’t Worry, It Gets Worse or follow her blog, The Frenemy.


 
 

You're Never Weird on the Internet (almost)

posted by: November 30, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for You're Never Weird on the InternetSince uploading the first episode of her breakout web series to the Internet, Felicia Day has maintained an omnipotent online presence. Fortunately for all the nerds and geeks of the world, she found the willpower to minimize her browser long enough to share her experiences in her memoir You’re Never Weird on the Internet (almost). And according to her twitter, she was so stoked to wear that dress. I would be too.

 

In You’re Never Weird, Day reminisces about her mother’s unique methods of homeschooling, her countless hours of practicing to become a violin virtuoso and her first obsession with a video game called Ultima. Her uncanny power to dedicate herself to a worthy cause aided her in creating a semi-autobiographical web series called The Guild, which debuted in 2007 and represented a notable portion of the initial traffic on a little site known as YouTube. Reading about Day’s life makes every scene exponentially funnier because readers will be able to attribute her characters’ bizarre quirks and obsessions to things she experienced as her online persona — or in reality, but that’s never as fun.

 

Day also includes a discourse on the recent movement #GamerGate, in which she details how she felt about the initial scandal and dealt with the brushfire of hate that whipped her way as the online trolls carried out their misguided crusades. Curiously, she didn’t spin many tales from the sets of Buffy and Supernatural, but there are plenty of stories in You’re Never Weird to keep readers laughing as they turn the pages.

 

Whether readers recognize her from the commercials she did in the mid-2000s to keep her World of Warcraft addiction fueled, or know her as Cyd Sherman — aka Codex the Cleric — Felicia Day’s memoir is a well-written, highly entertaining read that’s perfect for anyone who wears the title of “geek” or “nerd” with pride.

Tom

Tom

 
 

101 Easy Asian Recipes

posted by: November 27, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for 101 Easy Asian RecipesAs a serious home cook who loves to read cookbooks, I was excited to get my hands on 101 Easy Asian Recipes, by Peter Meehan and the editors of Lucky Peach. I’m a longtime fan of Lucky Peach magazine, a quarterly journal that focuses on food writing of all kinds. Their first cookbook is very approachable. It features simple, clear instructions, plenty of procedural drawings (like how to properly fill and seal a dumpling) and glossy color photographs of finished dishes. Meehan admits that “Asian” is a wide catch-all term — for example, there are no Indian recipes in the book — and they’re not necessarily aiming for authenticity. A recipe for “mall chicken” is a nod to the sauce-doused chicken chunks sampled on toothpicks at nearly every food court you’ve ever visited. This version is baked rather than fried, but is no less craveable.

 

A trip to an Asian supermarket to stock your pantry is a must as you’ll need things you probably won’t find at your local supermarket. Not only does the book provide a frequently used ingredient list, but there are photographic spreads of the actual items. This helps remove any possible confusion, as many of the ingredients may be unfamiliar. These include things like black vinegar, fish sauce, sesame oil, sambal oelek, dashi and white pepper. Recipes call for all types of noodles, from ramen and udon to gluten-free Korean glass noodles (made from sweet potato starch) and rice sticks.

 

Meehan has a great sense of humor that shines through in the notes, the recipes are easy to follow and the results are impressive. I’ve made several dishes with great success in the last couple of weeks, including a smashed cucumber salad with chili, cilantro and peanuts; braised baby bok choy with oyster sauce and crispy garlic; and homemade “dollar dumplings” with dipping sauce. Borrow 101 Easy Asian Recipes now and you’ll likely buy your own copy later.


 
 

Two Hours

posted by: November 25, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Two HoursIn Two Hours: The Quest to Run the Impossible Marathon, Ed Caesar discusses what it would take for a man to complete the arbitrary distance of 26.2 miles under the arbitrary time limit of two hours.

 

Why 26.2 miles? Every runner knows the story of Pheidippides, who ran 150 miles to request help from the Spartan army when the Persians landed in Greece. He then ran 25 miles from the battlefield near Marathon to Athens where he announced the Greek victory, and promptly died on the spot from exhaustion. When the modern Olympics began in 1896, it included a “marathon” race inspired by Pheidippides’ (likely fictional) journey. Marathon distances were approximately 25 miles until 1921, when the International Amateur Athletic Federation set the distance to match the course of the 1908 London Olympic marathon. The 1908 marathon route began at Windsor Castle and finished with a lap around the track inside White City Stadium, ending in front of the Royal Box. Any runner who makes it to mile 25 of a marathon and doesn’t think he can run another 1.2 can thank the British royal family for their viewing preferences.

 

And why two hours? In 1991, Mike Joyner concluded that the ideal runner under ideal conditions could complete a marathon in 1 hour, 57 minutes and 58 seconds, and published his findings in the Journal of Applied Physiology. At the time, the world record was 02:06:50. The current world record, set 23 years later by Kenyan Dennis Kimetto at the 2014 Berlin Marathon, is nearly four minutes faster at 02:02:57.
Whether it’s likely that we will see a sub-two hour marathon in the near future is hotly debated. Caesar discusses issues of science, technology, psychology and economics that affect the “ideal runner” and “ideal conditions.” He considers everything from advancements in road pavement, to the illegal use of performance enhancing drugs, to why the Western Rift Valley of Kenya produces such amazing distance runners. Caesar writes extensively about the training and career of accomplished Kenyan runner Geoffrey Mutai to put a face to the challenge.

 

Two Hours is the perfect book to relax with over the winter, perhaps in anticipation of training for your own spring marathon. Fans of Born to Run by Christopher McDougall will definitely enjoy this as well.


 
 

Humans of New York

posted by: November 24, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Humans of New YorkIt’s very easy to get caught up in the lives of fictional characters in novels or celebrities on TV. However, photographer Brandon Stanton’s new book Humans of New York: Stories uses stunning portraits and personal anecdotes to show that the most interesting and compelling stories can come from everyday people around us. Stanton originally began photographing the citizens of New York as part of a project to create a visual census of the city. His pictures wound up becoming the wildly successful blog, Humans of New York. As his project grew, he went from including one-line captions on his photos to entire paragraphs of stories the people he met on the street would tell him.

 

While his first book, Humans of New York (2013), focuses more on photography and includes just a few captions, this book contains many more of the personal and in-depth stories found on his blog today. The stories range from devastatingly sad to chillingly insightful to warmly endearing, while the people photographed cover a variety of races, ages, social classes and genders.

 

It’s hard not to get absorbed into Stanton’s book and the beautifully poignant stories within. Individually, an anecdote from a stranger might not be much to consider, but together, they create a broad spectrum of captivating stories that truly reflect both the intricacy and brevity of human life.


 
 

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