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Librarians

Love Triangle in the Texas Panhandle

Love Triangle in the Texas Panhandle

posted by:
September 21, 2012 - 7:03am

TumbleweedsTumbleweeds by Leila Meacham is one part romance, one part saga and one part character study, but in all parts a ripping good read. Cathy Benson is orphaned while living in California, and sent to live with her grandmother in Kersey, Texas. There she is befriended by John Caldwell and Trey Don Hall, two boys who also have absent parents. They become her protectors. In high school, the boys become the stars of the Kersey football team and seem destined for greater things. Kathy shows a knack for science and medicine and throws herself into her studies. Both boys are deeply in love with Kathy, but it’s Trey who makes the first move, and he and Kathy become high school sweethearts. A secret between John and Trey threatens their futures and their friendship, and an unexpected event changes the lives of the three friends forever. The novel follows the threesome through high school, college and careers, and ultimately their return to town at age forty for a reunion.

 

Meacham creates three sympathetic characters, and the reader is privy to information that each character knows but seems unwilling to share with the other two. This builds suspense as the reader waits for the secrets to be revealed. There is enough information and character development to strengthen the motivations of the characters, and each decision stays within believability.  Readers will enjoy getting to know the three friends, spend time with them, and care what will happen to them in the future. Tumbleweeds is a wonderful look into a world of small town dreams, friendship, love, and growing older. Meacham’s previous novel, Roses was also a reader favorite, and she is a writer to keep on any must read list.

Doug

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A Journey through Time

A Journey through Time

posted by:
September 20, 2012 - 8:30am

Shadow of NightShadow of Night, the second book in Deborah Harkness’s All Souls trilogy, was released this summer to the delight of her fans. It continues the story of historian/witch Diana and geneticist/vampire Matthew who met and fell in love in A Discovery of Witches. They go back in time to Elizabethan London to continue their search for the alchemical manuscript Ashmole 782. Upon their arrival, they meet Matthew’s friends from the School of Night, all well-known historical figures like Sir Walter Raleigh and Christopher Marlowe. Their spellbinding journey takes readers to England, France, and Prague. Diana continues her magical education while facing the dangers of being a witch in that time period, and much more is revealed about Matthew’s past and his family.

 

This series has enchanted readers with its blend of magic, history, and romance. Shadow of Night picks up right where the series-starter A Discovery of Witches left off, so readers new to the series will need to start with the first book. The series is flavored by rich historical detail. The author’s passion for history comes as no surprise, though. Harkness is a professor of history at University of Southern California in Los Angeles. Some of the lingering questions from the first book of the series are answered in Shadow of Night, but many more are left to be explained in the final book of the series.

 

Harkness’s knowledge of wine is evident in her novels, especially A Discovery of Witches. Many readers may not realize that in her spare time, she shares her love of wine on her award-winning blog Good Wine Under $20.

Beth

 
 

Past is Present

Past is Present

posted by:
September 17, 2012 - 8:45am

The Cutting SeasonAttica Locke’s highly anticipated new novel The Cutting Season is an atmospheric murder mystery that weaves together two stories, skillfully drawing readers between past and present. A gripping story of race, love, and politics, The Cutting Season grabs readers from the first page. Caren Gray’s family has been connected to Belle Vie, an antebellum plantation in Louisiana, for generations. Unlike the neighboring farm where migrant workers harvest sugarcane, Belle Vie is now an historic estate open for tourists and social events. Caren lives on and manages the estate where she catches glimpses of the plantation’s dark history every day. When a murdered woman who worked on the neighboring farm is found in a shallow grave on Belle Vie, local police begin an investigation that Caren feels isn’t being handled properly. She digs deeper, asking questions that lead her to Belle Vie’s past. As she learns more, she starts to see parallels between the current murder and the disappearance of a former slave named Jason in 1872. Caren is unearthing secrets that someone may kill to keep hidden.

 

This novel is the first book in HarperCollins publishing’s new Dennis Lehane Books imprint. Lehane says of Locke’s writing, “I was first struck by Attica Locke's prose, then by the ingenuity of her narrative and finally and most deeply by the depth of her humanity. She writes with equal amounts grace and passion. After just two novels, I'd probably read the phone book if her name was on the spine." If The Cutting Season is any indication of what readers can expect from Lehane’s imprint, it will be very successful.

 

Beth

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Truth or Torture

Truth or Torture

posted by:
September 17, 2012 - 8:20am

The InquisitorGeiger, a troubled and complex man, has one special talent – he is able to immediately discern a lie. This skill comes in handy in his work as an information retrieval specialist, a euphemism for professional torturer. In The Inquisitor, Mark Allen Smith creates a unique, flawed character in this sometimes grisly, but always thrilling story that follows this one-named man in a dark world of intrigue.

 

Geiger and his partner Harry enjoy their work in the torture business, and while Geiger has complete focus on his craft, he does have one unbendable rule that he will not hurt children. Geiger himself has no memory of his life before he woke up on a bus when he was 19 or 20. He is working with a counselor to unlock some of the repressed memories from his traumatic childhood in an effort to eradicate the debilitating migraines which have been occurring more frequently.  

     

Geiger’s client, Richard Hall, is supposed to be bringing an art thief to him, but instead shows up with the thief’s twelve-year-old son Ezra. Rather than torture Ezra to discover his dad’s whereabouts, Geiger takes the boy and goes on the run. His protective instinct triggered, he also begins to develop an unexpected emotional attachment to Ezra. Hall and his cronies pursue the duo and the chase is on!  Unfortunately for Geiger, his resources pale in comparison to Hall’s who seems to have unlimited power and contacts in high places. In fact, as Geiger soon learns, there is much more at stake than a stolen painting. This fast-paced thrill ride with a compelling protagonist makes this a memorable debut which ends too soon. The good news is that Geiger will be back as Smith is hard at work on the sequel.  

 

Maureen

 
 

A Not so Peaceful Place

A Not so Peaceful Place

posted by:
September 17, 2012 - 7:45am

Gone MissingIn the quiet and picturesque town of Painters Mill, Ohio there is a thriving Amish community. These families have strong religious beliefs and shun the use of electricity, cars, and motorized farming equipment. They lead a simple life by relying on the land, and they have minimal interaction with outsiders. One would think such a peaceful place would be unfamiliar with the darker side of human nature, but sadly one would be mistaken. Linda Castillo has created an exciting mystery series situated in this bucolic setting, which has seen a crazed serial killer targeting both Amish and English women, a horrific home invasion, and hate crimes. The disappearance of young Amish teens is the focus of her latest release Gone Missing.

 

The Painter’s Mill Sheriff’s Department, though small, has a valuable and effective tool at its disposal to assist in solving crimes that involve the Amish. Her name is Chief Kate Burkholder, and along with her experience as a big-city law enforcement officer, she also was raised Amish. The plain folk have a natural distrust of law enforcement and few people are in the position to cope with the clash of cultures and ideals as Chief Burkholder.

 

Gone Missing is the fourth Amish mystery written by Castillo, though it is not necessary to read them in chronological order. In each, she provides a concise backstory that summarizes her protagonists’ personal demons and the inner battle to keep them in check. Sworn to Silence, the first Kate Burkholder novel, is under production by the Lifetime network as a two-hour movie starring Neve Campbell, with the possibility of it becoming a regular series. Interesting, informative, and chilling, these mysteries may not represent a serene drive in the country, but they are definitely worth the trip.

 

Jeanne

 
 

Life As We Come to See It

Life As We Come to See It

posted by:
September 14, 2012 - 8:45am

An Uncommon EducationWaiting for one’s life to begin often means missing out on the present. In An Uncommon Education, Elizabeth Percer presents a reflective, coming-of-age story. Naomi Feinstein spends her childhood waiting for circumstances to change, especially hoping for more friends and freedom from her classmates’ cruelty. As a young adult, she gradually comes to terms with her life, embracing both its imperfections and possibilities. 

 

More than one person’s reflections, however, this book is also an immigrant story and family saga. Naomi chronicles her lonely childhood with first-generation immigrant parents who were often in poor health. Her father was Jewish and her mother a Catholic who converted to Judaism, which furthers her feelings of isolation and confuses her sense of identity and where she belongs. Gifted with a photographic memory and fascinated from an early age with saving lives and curing illness, Naomi goes to Wellesley College to become a doctor. Her time at the school is heavily influenced by her initiation into a secret Shakespeare society comprised of students who are all unconventional or outsiders in some capacity.

 

Although a large part of this story takes place at a university, Naomi’s true “education” is the life lessons she receives along the way, particularly when a scandal threatens her hard-earned friendships. Percer’s writing is very poetic and lyrical. As a narrator, Naomi is smart and insightful, and as her character matures, so does her narrative style and thought process. Readers will relate to her journey, which is less heroic than it is a series of wrong turns and learning by trial and error. A good recommend for book clubs.

 

Melanie

 
 

Fables for Grownups

Fables for Grownups

posted by:
September 14, 2012 - 8:00am

Some Kind of Fairy TaleCharlotte Markham and the House of DarklingIn Some Kind of Fairy Tale by Graham Joyce, we meet the Martin family, who has been devastated since their sixteen-year-old daughter Tara mysteriously disappeared twenty years ago. Searches were unsuccessful and her boyfriend Richie was accused but never charged. On Christmas Day Tara resurfaces looking just as she had twenty years before, spinning a seemingly implausible tale of a mysterious gentleman and a place in the woods that only allows access several times a year. Tara insists that only six months have passed, but her family remains twenty years older. The Martin family must decide to question the nature of reality, or question Tara’s sanity. Some Kind of Fairy Tale takes an interesting spin on the contemporary fable and is definitely a unique read.

 

Another new and very different look at another world is the slightly darker Charlotte Markham and the House of Darkling by Michael Boccacino. It begins as a standard gothic piece with a large English country house, the master in mourning from the loss of his young wife, and an attractive governess hired to care for the two children. It soon becomes apparent that all is not as it seems in the town when the nanny of the boys is murdered, seemingly ripped apart by wild animals. Charlotte and the two boys are also having mysterious dreams about a man dressed entirely in black and a strange house through the mists where the boys’ mother remains alive. When these dreams become reality, Charlotte finds herself playing a dangerous game, one that she must win for the sake of herself and the children. Both of these tales offer strong characters, suspense, mystery and an enticing other-worldly setting. Perfect for adults who want a bit of fairy magic and a fascinating tale that will sweep them out of reality into a world of dreams.

Doug

 
 

Across the Pond Contenders

Across the Pond Contenders

posted by:
September 13, 2012 - 8:30am

Bring Up the BodiesThe Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold FrySkiosWhat do Skios by Michael Frayn, The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry by Rachel Joyce, and Hilary Mantel’s Bring Up the Bodies have in common? Each has been included on the Long List of Great Britain’s highly coveted contemporary fiction award, the Man Booker Prize.

 

Taking place on the private Greek island of Skios, blonde Nikki Hook is the coolly capable public relations rep for the prestigious Fred Toppler foundation. She is preparing for the arrival of, and fantasizing about, much vaunted guest speaker Dr. Norman Wilfred. Nikki’s gal pal Georgie is heading to a secretive tryst at the other end of the island with dilettante playboy Oscar Fox. Lost luggage, mistaken identity, wrong rooms, taxi-driving brothers, and a language barrier all figure prominently in this farce, both comedic and satirical. Euphoksoliva, anyone?

 

Hobby-less Harold is recently retired. Seemingly estranged from his only son, on the very last nerve of his house-cleaning wife, and locked in desultory lawn care chats with his recently widowed neighbor, Harold needs a purpose. Purpose arrives via the mail in the guise of a brief letter from former co-worker Queenie Hennessy, who writes to let Harold know she is dying. Harold responds with a quick condolence note but instead decides that if he walks to see Queenie himself, she will survive. Marching along in yacht shoes and a neck tie, The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry has Mr. Fry walking five hundred miles through England as he develops both blisters and perspective in this charming yet poignant tale.

 

Bring Up the Bodies is the sequel to Hilary Mantel’s 2009 winner of the Booker Prize, Wolf Hall, and again features Thomas Cromwell. Now a powerful minister to Henry VIII, Cromwell’s job is to clear out Anne Boleyn as Henry yearns to replace her with Jane Seymour. Written using present tense, the author offers a fresh view on Cromwell as a thoughtful reformer carrying out the wishes of the King. Mantel’s skill in writing fascinating and suspenseful historical fiction is on display here, drawing in the reader despite the foregone conclusion. Mantel plans a third book which will complete the Thomas Cromwell trilogy.

 

Lori

 
 

Hollywood Dreams

Hollywood Dreams

posted by:
September 11, 2012 - 8:30am

The Next Best ThingLike the heroine of her new novel The Next Best Thing, bestselling author Jennifer Weiner thought that it was a dream come true when she was approached to co-create a sitcom featuring a plus-sized heroine trying to break into show business. Although State of Georgia was short-lived, Weiner used her experiences in the television industry to create her new novel.

 

Readers first met Ruth Saunders in the short story “Swim” in Weiner’s The Guy Not Taken: Stories. After losing her parents in an accident that permanently scarred her, Ruth was raised by her grandmother. During her recovery from her injuries, Ruth and her grandmother found comfort in their favorite TV shows, like The Golden Girls. After she finished college, Ruth and her grandmother moved to Hollywood to chase Ruth’s dream of writing television shows. Now, Ruth has worked her way from glorified gofer to the creator of her first TV show, The Next Best Thing, a sitcom based loosely on her own life.

 

Ruth struggles with the process of shooting the pilot and first season of her show. As the show evolves, she watches her heartwarming comedy about an average girl breaking in to the restaurant business with the love and support of her grandmother change into another show entirely. Cady, the famous actress that the network forced Ruth to hire to play the plus-sized heroine, suddenly diets her way to a size 0. Network politics force her to fire actors that she thinks are right for the show, and the character based on her grandmother is rewritten as an oversexed cougar. Is this really the career she has always dreamed of? Weiner’s Hollywood-insider perspective and warm humor make readers cheer for Ruth’s chance to have it all.

 

Weiner is known for connecting with her readers via social media.  Fans can follow her on Twitter (@JenniferWeiner), where she live-tweets reality TV shows like The Bachelor and shares her favorite new books with her readers.

 

Beth

 
 

Swan Song

Swan Song

posted by:
September 10, 2012 - 8:45am

The Ugly DuchessTheodora Saxby is The Ugly Duchess in Eloisa James’ fourth Regency fairy tale inspired by Andersen’s The Ugly Duckling. All her life she’s been told that her looks are less than impressive, and she knows that her only chance at marriage will be to snag a fortune hunter. When she sets her sights on Geoffrey Trevelyan, she enlists the help of her best friend, James Ryburn, the Earl of Islay. She wants James to pretend to court her so Geoffrey will be forced to propose. But the close contact creates sparks between these two friends and when it is James who asks for her hand, Theo follows her heart.  

 

But a fairy tale wouldn’t be complete without a villain, and in this story it’s James’ father, the Duke of Ashbrook. The Duke had amassed gambling debts which threatened the future of the estate and he forced his son to marry Theo for her money. Basking in the glow of newlywed happiness, Theo overhears James and his father arguing and quickly realizes that is was her money that led James down the aisle. Theo banishes James from their home and demands that he leave England. She then reinvents herself and becomes a glittering society swan. For seven years, Theo lives independently and in-demand without any idea of the whereabouts of her husband. When James finally returns, he is changed physically (he’s got a tattoo!) and emotionally, but remains steadfast in his desire to reclaim his beautiful wife who he always saw as a swan.

 

Eloisa James has created another enchanting fairy tale love story with two passionate characters, a touch of wit, and a happily ever after. Lucky local fans can meet Eloisa in person at Nora Roberts’ Turn the Page Bookstore in Boonsboro, where she’ll be signing with Nora and several other authors on September 15th from noon until two o'clock. 

 

Maureen