Welcome to the Baltimore County Public Library.

Baltimore County Public Library logo Taste of the Town. Saturday, May 3, 2014 from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. Get your tickets now...
   
Type of search:   

Between the Covers / Shhhh... we're reading.   Photo of reading after bedtime
Adult | Fiction

 

RSS this blog

Tags

Adult

+ Fiction

   Fantasy

   Graphic Novel

   Historical

   Horror

   Humor

   Legal

   Literary

   Magical Realism

   Media Tie-In

   Mystery

   Mythology

   Paranormal

   Romance

   Science Fiction

   Thriller

+ Nonfiction

   Author Interviews

   Awards

   In the News

Teen

+ Fiction

   Adventure

   Dystopian

   Fantasy

   Graphic Novel

   Historical

   Humor

   Media Tie-In

   Mystery

   Paranormal

   Realistic

   Romance

   Science Fiction

   Steampunk

   Nonfiction

   Author Interviews

   Awards

   In the News

Children

+ Fiction

   Adventure

   Beginning Reader

   Concepts

   Fantasy

   First Chapter Book

   Graphic Novel

   Historical

   Humor

   Media Tie-In

   Mystery

   Picture Book

   Realistic

   Tales

+ Nonfiction

   Author Interviews

   Awards

   In the News

Librarians

Truth or Torture

Truth or Torture

posted by:
September 17, 2012 - 8:20am

The InquisitorGeiger, a troubled and complex man, has one special talent – he is able to immediately discern a lie. This skill comes in handy in his work as an information retrieval specialist, a euphemism for professional torturer. In The Inquisitor, Mark Allen Smith creates a unique, flawed character in this sometimes grisly, but always thrilling story that follows this one-named man in a dark world of intrigue.

 

Geiger and his partner Harry enjoy their work in the torture business, and while Geiger has complete focus on his craft, he does have one unbendable rule that he will not hurt children. Geiger himself has no memory of his life before he woke up on a bus when he was 19 or 20. He is working with a counselor to unlock some of the repressed memories from his traumatic childhood in an effort to eradicate the debilitating migraines which have been occurring more frequently.  

     

Geiger’s client, Richard Hall, is supposed to be bringing an art thief to him, but instead shows up with the thief’s twelve-year-old son Ezra. Rather than torture Ezra to discover his dad’s whereabouts, Geiger takes the boy and goes on the run. His protective instinct triggered, he also begins to develop an unexpected emotional attachment to Ezra. Hall and his cronies pursue the duo and the chase is on!  Unfortunately for Geiger, his resources pale in comparison to Hall’s who seems to have unlimited power and contacts in high places. In fact, as Geiger soon learns, there is much more at stake than a stolen painting. This fast-paced thrill ride with a compelling protagonist makes this a memorable debut which ends too soon. The good news is that Geiger will be back as Smith is hard at work on the sequel.  

 

Maureen

 
 

A Not so Peaceful Place

A Not so Peaceful Place

posted by:
September 17, 2012 - 7:45am

Gone MissingIn the quiet and picturesque town of Painters Mill, Ohio there is a thriving Amish community. These families have strong religious beliefs and shun the use of electricity, cars, and motorized farming equipment. They lead a simple life by relying on the land, and they have minimal interaction with outsiders. One would think such a peaceful place would be unfamiliar with the darker side of human nature, but sadly one would be mistaken. Linda Castillo has created an exciting mystery series situated in this bucolic setting, which has seen a crazed serial killer targeting both Amish and English women, a horrific home invasion, and hate crimes. The disappearance of young Amish teens is the focus of her latest release Gone Missing.

 

The Painter’s Mill Sheriff’s Department, though small, has a valuable and effective tool at its disposal to assist in solving crimes that involve the Amish. Her name is Chief Kate Burkholder, and along with her experience as a big-city law enforcement officer, she also was raised Amish. The plain folk have a natural distrust of law enforcement and few people are in the position to cope with the clash of cultures and ideals as Chief Burkholder.

 

Gone Missing is the fourth Amish mystery written by Castillo, though it is not necessary to read them in chronological order. In each, she provides a concise backstory that summarizes her protagonists’ personal demons and the inner battle to keep them in check. Sworn to Silence, the first Kate Burkholder novel, is under production by the Lifetime network as a two-hour movie starring Neve Campbell, with the possibility of it becoming a regular series. Interesting, informative, and chilling, these mysteries may not represent a serene drive in the country, but they are definitely worth the trip.

 

Jeanne

 
 

Life As We Come to See It

Life As We Come to See It

posted by:
September 14, 2012 - 8:45am

An Uncommon EducationWaiting for one’s life to begin often means missing out on the present. In An Uncommon Education, Elizabeth Percer presents a reflective, coming-of-age story. Naomi Feinstein spends her childhood waiting for circumstances to change, especially hoping for more friends and freedom from her classmates’ cruelty. As a young adult, she gradually comes to terms with her life, embracing both its imperfections and possibilities. 

 

More than one person’s reflections, however, this book is also an immigrant story and family saga. Naomi chronicles her lonely childhood with first-generation immigrant parents who were often in poor health. Her father was Jewish and her mother a Catholic who converted to Judaism, which furthers her feelings of isolation and confuses her sense of identity and where she belongs. Gifted with a photographic memory and fascinated from an early age with saving lives and curing illness, Naomi goes to Wellesley College to become a doctor. Her time at the school is heavily influenced by her initiation into a secret Shakespeare society comprised of students who are all unconventional or outsiders in some capacity.

 

Although a large part of this story takes place at a university, Naomi’s true “education” is the life lessons she receives along the way, particularly when a scandal threatens her hard-earned friendships. Percer’s writing is very poetic and lyrical. As a narrator, Naomi is smart and insightful, and as her character matures, so does her narrative style and thought process. Readers will relate to her journey, which is less heroic than it is a series of wrong turns and learning by trial and error. A good recommend for book clubs.

 

Melanie

 
 

Fables for Grownups

Fables for Grownups

posted by:
September 14, 2012 - 8:00am

Some Kind of Fairy TaleCharlotte Markham and the House of DarklingIn Some Kind of Fairy Tale by Graham Joyce, we meet the Martin family, who has been devastated since their sixteen-year-old daughter Tara mysteriously disappeared twenty years ago. Searches were unsuccessful and her boyfriend Richie was accused but never charged. On Christmas Day Tara resurfaces looking just as she had twenty years before, spinning a seemingly implausible tale of a mysterious gentleman and a place in the woods that only allows access several times a year. Tara insists that only six months have passed, but her family remains twenty years older. The Martin family must decide to question the nature of reality, or question Tara’s sanity. Some Kind of Fairy Tale takes an interesting spin on the contemporary fable and is definitely a unique read.

 

Another new and very different look at another world is the slightly darker Charlotte Markham and the House of Darkling by Michael Boccacino. It begins as a standard gothic piece with a large English country house, the master in mourning from the loss of his young wife, and an attractive governess hired to care for the two children. It soon becomes apparent that all is not as it seems in the town when the nanny of the boys is murdered, seemingly ripped apart by wild animals. Charlotte and the two boys are also having mysterious dreams about a man dressed entirely in black and a strange house through the mists where the boys’ mother remains alive. When these dreams become reality, Charlotte finds herself playing a dangerous game, one that she must win for the sake of herself and the children. Both of these tales offer strong characters, suspense, mystery and an enticing other-worldly setting. Perfect for adults who want a bit of fairy magic and a fascinating tale that will sweep them out of reality into a world of dreams.

Doug

 
 

Across the Pond Contenders

Across the Pond Contenders

posted by:
September 13, 2012 - 8:30am

Bring Up the BodiesThe Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold FrySkiosWhat do Skios by Michael Frayn, The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry by Rachel Joyce, and Hilary Mantel’s Bring Up the Bodies have in common? Each has been included on the Long List of Great Britain’s highly coveted contemporary fiction award, the Man Booker Prize.

 

Taking place on the private Greek island of Skios, blonde Nikki Hook is the coolly capable public relations rep for the prestigious Fred Toppler foundation. She is preparing for the arrival of, and fantasizing about, much vaunted guest speaker Dr. Norman Wilfred. Nikki’s gal pal Georgie is heading to a secretive tryst at the other end of the island with dilettante playboy Oscar Fox. Lost luggage, mistaken identity, wrong rooms, taxi-driving brothers, and a language barrier all figure prominently in this farce, both comedic and satirical. Euphoksoliva, anyone?

 

Hobby-less Harold is recently retired. Seemingly estranged from his only son, on the very last nerve of his house-cleaning wife, and locked in desultory lawn care chats with his recently widowed neighbor, Harold needs a purpose. Purpose arrives via the mail in the guise of a brief letter from former co-worker Queenie Hennessy, who writes to let Harold know she is dying. Harold responds with a quick condolence note but instead decides that if he walks to see Queenie himself, she will survive. Marching along in yacht shoes and a neck tie, The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry has Mr. Fry walking five hundred miles through England as he develops both blisters and perspective in this charming yet poignant tale.

 

Bring Up the Bodies is the sequel to Hilary Mantel’s 2009 winner of the Booker Prize, Wolf Hall, and again features Thomas Cromwell. Now a powerful minister to Henry VIII, Cromwell’s job is to clear out Anne Boleyn as Henry yearns to replace her with Jane Seymour. Written using present tense, the author offers a fresh view on Cromwell as a thoughtful reformer carrying out the wishes of the King. Mantel’s skill in writing fascinating and suspenseful historical fiction is on display here, drawing in the reader despite the foregone conclusion. Mantel plans a third book which will complete the Thomas Cromwell trilogy.

 

Lori

 
 

Hollywood Dreams

Hollywood Dreams

posted by:
September 11, 2012 - 8:30am

The Next Best ThingLike the heroine of her new novel The Next Best Thing, bestselling author Jennifer Weiner thought that it was a dream come true when she was approached to co-create a sitcom featuring a plus-sized heroine trying to break into show business. Although State of Georgia was short-lived, Weiner used her experiences in the television industry to create her new novel.

 

Readers first met Ruth Saunders in the short story “Swim” in Weiner’s The Guy Not Taken: Stories. After losing her parents in an accident that permanently scarred her, Ruth was raised by her grandmother. During her recovery from her injuries, Ruth and her grandmother found comfort in their favorite TV shows, like The Golden Girls. After she finished college, Ruth and her grandmother moved to Hollywood to chase Ruth’s dream of writing television shows. Now, Ruth has worked her way from glorified gofer to the creator of her first TV show, The Next Best Thing, a sitcom based loosely on her own life.

 

Ruth struggles with the process of shooting the pilot and first season of her show. As the show evolves, she watches her heartwarming comedy about an average girl breaking in to the restaurant business with the love and support of her grandmother change into another show entirely. Cady, the famous actress that the network forced Ruth to hire to play the plus-sized heroine, suddenly diets her way to a size 0. Network politics force her to fire actors that she thinks are right for the show, and the character based on her grandmother is rewritten as an oversexed cougar. Is this really the career she has always dreamed of? Weiner’s Hollywood-insider perspective and warm humor make readers cheer for Ruth’s chance to have it all.

 

Weiner is known for connecting with her readers via social media.  Fans can follow her on Twitter (@JenniferWeiner), where she live-tweets reality TV shows like The Bachelor and shares her favorite new books with her readers.

 

Beth

 
 

Swan Song

Swan Song

posted by:
September 10, 2012 - 8:45am

The Ugly DuchessTheodora Saxby is The Ugly Duchess in Eloisa James’ fourth Regency fairy tale inspired by Andersen’s The Ugly Duckling. All her life she’s been told that her looks are less than impressive, and she knows that her only chance at marriage will be to snag a fortune hunter. When she sets her sights on Geoffrey Trevelyan, she enlists the help of her best friend, James Ryburn, the Earl of Islay. She wants James to pretend to court her so Geoffrey will be forced to propose. But the close contact creates sparks between these two friends and when it is James who asks for her hand, Theo follows her heart.  

 

But a fairy tale wouldn’t be complete without a villain, and in this story it’s James’ father, the Duke of Ashbrook. The Duke had amassed gambling debts which threatened the future of the estate and he forced his son to marry Theo for her money. Basking in the glow of newlywed happiness, Theo overhears James and his father arguing and quickly realizes that is was her money that led James down the aisle. Theo banishes James from their home and demands that he leave England. She then reinvents herself and becomes a glittering society swan. For seven years, Theo lives independently and in-demand without any idea of the whereabouts of her husband. When James finally returns, he is changed physically (he’s got a tattoo!) and emotionally, but remains steadfast in his desire to reclaim his beautiful wife who he always saw as a swan.

 

Eloisa James has created another enchanting fairy tale love story with two passionate characters, a touch of wit, and a happily ever after. Lucky local fans can meet Eloisa in person at Nora Roberts’ Turn the Page Bookstore in Boonsboro, where she’ll be signing with Nora and several other authors on September 15th from noon until two o'clock. 

 

Maureen

 
 

A Platypus and a Wombat Walk Into a Bar...

A Platypus and a Wombat Walk Into a Bar...

posted by:
September 7, 2012 - 8:45am

Albert of Adelaide“Albert had come to the conclusion that the key to survival in Old Australia was in picking a criminal element you liked and sticking with it.”

 

Albert of Adelaide is tired of his life. He is bored by his daily routine, the same meals over and over, the same neighbors arguing and complaining, the same people gawking at him day in and day out. He longs for freedom and adventure, to experience life as it was meant to be lived. He gets his chance when an inattentive staffer fails to lock his cage and Albert the platypus breaks out of the Adelaide Zoo, beginning his journey toward self-discovery.

 

Following tales and legends, Albert begins his search for “Old Australia,” a place where animals rule themselves and humans do not interfere. Along the way, he makes friends as well as enemies. Even among the animals Albert is a curiosity, which proves to be both an advantage and disadvantage for him. Curiosity soon turns to fear, and Albert must learn the difficult lesson that not everyone nice is inherently good and not every criminal is inherently bad.

 

Debut novelist Howard Anderson has created a thought-provoking and entertaining story. Comparisons to Watership Down or even Animal Farm are inevitable, but Albert is much more reminiscent of Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. The Wild West language and shoot ‘em up simplicity of Old Australia draws the reader in, with many laugh-out-loud moments to enjoy. The supporting characters are a literal hoot, namely the pyromaniac wombat and a pair of drunken bandicoots. Albert of Adelaide is recommended for fans of westerns, animal stories, or anyone who likes a good laugh.

 

Sam

categories:

 
 

Glitter and Blood

Glitter and Blood

posted by:
September 7, 2012 - 8:00am

Dare MeWho knew that the world of high school cheerleading could be so fascinating?  Dare Me by Megan Abbott is a chilling tale that needs to be read in one sitting. Abby Hanlon is lieutenant to cheerleading captain Beth Cassidy. The two women are used to the status quo, the hierarchy of high school. Things change as their coach leaves and is replaced by Colette French, a young coach who begins to push the girls to their limits, turning them into champions. She gathers the young women into a cohesive unit, urging them to work together to go farther and fly higher. Colette presents herself as a mentor and a friend to the girls. She invites them to her house, often neglecting her husband and daughter. She supplies them with alcohol and berates them about weight issues. Colette sees no need for a team captain, which doesn’t sit well with Beth, who is used to being top dog. Beth becomes sullen and resentful, and Abby seems caught in the middle. Then an apparent suicide rocks the town, threatening to reveal squad secrets. A power struggle ensues that threatens to tear apart the squad, and the reader wonders who will survive the fallout.

 

Though the setting of Dare Me is high school, the intense theme makes it a book for older teens and adults. Abbott captures the cheerleading world perfectly. She describes the moves and tricks, the training, the blood, sweat and tears. She explores what happens when you are no longer accepted by the group, and the darkness and desperation of the human heart. Dare Me is a journey that is not easy, but once begun will need to be read to its intense conclusion.

Doug

categories:

 
 

The Beauty Killer Strikes Again

The Beauty Killer Strikes Again

posted by:
September 4, 2012 - 8:30am

Kill You TwiceKill You Twice, the fifth book in Chelsea Cain’s Gretchen Lowell series, is sure to keep readers up all night. This series of gory, fast-paced thrillers follows Portland detective Archie Sheridan who was kidnapped and tortured for 10 days by Dr. Gretchen Lowell, the Beauty Killer. Gretchen is both terrifyingly violent and undeniably magnetic. Even now, years after the attack, the two of them have a strange bond. No matter how hard Archie tries to stay away from Gretchen, he will never truly escape her influence.

 

In Kill You Twice, Archie is investigating a gruesome murder when he receives two cryptic pieces of information from Gretchen who now is locked away in a state mental institution: Gretchen has a child, and Archie should investigate someone named Ryan Motley. Kill You Twice gives readers a surprising glimpse into Gretchen’s past while pulling them deeper into her latest game of cat and mouse.

 

This riveting suspense series will remind readers of The Silence of the Lambs by Thomas Harris. It isn’t for the faint of heart, but fans of horror and suspense will be drawn into Gretchen’s web. Readers new to the Cain’s thrillers should start with Heartsick, the first novel in the series, which provides insight into how Archie and Gretchen’s dark, twisted relationship developed. 

 

FX recently announced that the network has begun development on a new TV series based on the Gretchen Lowell books. The first season will follow Heartsick. Cain is thrilled with the news. She wrote on her blog, “FX makes some awesome TV. JustifiedAmerican Horror StorySons of Anarchy. These people clearly buy fake blood in bulk and know how to use it.” Will Heartsick be the network’s next big hit?  Cain’s fans certainly hope so.

Beth

categories: