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Dem Bones

Dem Bones

posted by:
May 6, 2013 - 8:15am

The Crypt ThiefTake one American working as the head of security at the Paris embassy, add one psychologically disturbed killer suffering from a traumatic past life and throw in a murder in the historic Père Lachaise cemetery, close to the final resting spot of Jim Morrison, and you will find yourself in the middle of The Crypt Thief by Mark Pryor, a cracking good thriller featuring Hugo Marston. Hugo is an accomplished profiler, so when an American tourist is shot while apparently sightseeing in the cemetery, he is immediately notified. The victim turns out to be the son of a United States senator. When the woman he was with is identified as a Pakistani traveling on a false passport, red flags are raised and the embassy begins to fear the work of terrorists. Hugo is not convinced. The crime itself does not strike him as being the work of a professional assassin. The type of weapon, the location of the wounds on the body, and the apparent removal of a tattoo on the woman’s arm all point to someone with a more personal interest in the victims. The senator doesn’t hold with this theory  and wants to not only release information to the press that may cause a city wide panic, but also begin a manhunt for the female victim’s traveling companion who may have links to terrorist groups. Hugo must work quickly to solve the crime before all hell breaks loose.

 

The Crypt Thief is the second in the Hugo Marston series that started with The Bookseller. Pryor creates an interesting thriller featuring a demented killer with added elements of investigation that will appeal to mystery lovers. He also includes interesting tidbits about the city of Paris, so readers who appreciate good detail about the locale will find plenty to enjoy.

 

Doug

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Making One's Peace

Making One's Peace

posted by:
May 6, 2013 - 7:55am

Life After LifeWhoever said growing old gracefully was easy has not met the residents of Pine Haven Estates, a retirement community in Fulton, North Carolina. Decisions regretted and bittersweet memories are countered with surprising friendships and old fashioned orneriness. The confederate jasmine and wisteria arbor may shield the cemetery next door, but Pine Haven residents know it is the next stop. Oh well, such is life and death in Jill McCorkle’s stirring new novel, Life After Life, where the challenge to keep from disappearing meets the desire to embrace life at any age.

 

McCorkle, whose previous five novels were New York Times notable books, has loaded this, her first novel in 17 years, with quirky, well-drawn characters from both in and out of the retirement village. Making sense of it all is hospice volunteer Joanna Lamb, who ensures that dying residents are not forgotten. Arriving after her own tough spell, Joanna is there for their last day in the sun, "one more song, word, sip of water" before they pass. So she holds the hands of the dying and writes in her journal touching, eloquent remembrances of those who have died. For the eccentric group of residents still around, life remains a journey defined by their own choices. A former lawyer who feigns dementia, a retired school teacher who thinks everyone is really eight-years-old at heart, a Jewish resident from up north who wonders how she ended up in "the land of quilts and doilies," are among the repertoire of voices. Youth, too, passes through Pine Haven, as seventh grader  Abby prefers the residents to spending time with friends her own age, and a tattooed young mother named CJ does pedicures to escape her own past.

 

At times witty and other times poignant, McCorkle's brief narratives show off her penchant for short story form, along with the soul-searching that takes place when the life one has always known coalesces with the realities of aging. Fans of this southern writer are likely welcoming her return.

Cynthia

 
 

Don't Give Up... Don’t Ever Give Up

All You Could Ask ForMike Greenberg is best known as one-half of ESPN’s Mike and Mike in the Morning. But here, in his debut novel, All You Could Ask For, Greenberg leaves sports behind and hits a home run with this powerful novel about three women connected by cancer. Meet Samantha, Katherine, and Brooke, who share Greenwich, Connecticut as their hometown but are all at different places in their lives. Samantha is twenty-eight and two days into her honeymoon she discovers pictures of a naked woman in her husband’s email. Nude photos are also on Brooke’s mind. At forty, and after fifteen years of marriage and two kids, she is trying to muster the courage to present her husband with a personal portfolio featuring her and not much else. Finally, there is Katherine, a high-powered executive with a fabulous lifestyle. Her only problem is that her boss is the man who broke her heart eighteen years ago. Each woman works through her issues and gradually reaches resolution and happiness.

  

Those flashes of bliss are soon shattered as each receives a diagnosis of cancer and must face the disease head on. It is through a support group message board that the three meet and share their anger, fear, and hope for the future. The posted messages add more depth to each of these women as their innermost thoughts are revealed. These realistic, modern women struggle with the disease, treatment options, and side effects, yet they are strong and courageous. As their friendship grows, so does their spirit as each resolves to experience more “best days” of their lives. Perhaps the women’s voices are so honest because Greenberg, like so many of us, has personal experience with cancer and wrote the book to honor the memory of a close friend. Greenberg and his wife are donating all of the author proceeds to The V Foundation for Cancer Research

 

Maureen

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Taken by the Flood

Taken by the Flood

posted by:
April 29, 2013 - 8:15am

Evidence of LifeHow do you finally let go when you lose what matters most? This is the question asked by Barbara Taylor Sissel in her new novel Evidence of Life. When Abby’s husband Nick decides to take their daughter on a camping trip, Abby is thrilled that he wants to spend more time with his daughter. After they leave, the skies darken and the weather takes a turn for the worse. Roads are blocked with debris, major flooding ensues and emergency services warn travelers to stay off the roads. Abby receives a disturbing phone call from her daughter Lindsey, who tells her in a scared and distressed voice that they have traveled through San Antonio, Texas, a city far from their intended route. This is the last that Abby would hear from Nick or Lindsey.

 

Everyone is quickly presuming that Nick and Lindsey are dead, even though their bodies have not been recovered. Abby wants to give up the search and begin the grieving process, but there are too many unanswered questions. Her son Jake becomes distant, making fewer trips home from his college. Abby’s best friend Kate, though sympathetic, also seems to know more than she is telling. Nick was a lawyer on a high profile case and some suspect him of absconding with a great deal of money. Could Nick and Lindsey still be alive? Abby’s friends and family are skeptical and urge her to declare them dead and plan a memorial service, but Abby chooses a different path. She will keep searching until she uncovers the truth.

 

Evidence of Life is a suspenseful mystery with many twists and turns. Barbara Taylor Sissel creates an engaging main character in Abby, whose inquisitive nature pulls the reader through the story as we discover the truth along with her. Fans of Mary Higgins Clark will definitely find something to like in this novel.

 

Doug

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Out of Africa

Out of Africa

posted by:
April 29, 2013 - 7:55am

The Ashford AffairA Spear of Summer GrassLauren Willig’s new stand-alone novel The Ashford Affair is a departure from her well-known Pink Carnation series. The story, which the Library Journal says combines an “Out of Africa sensibility with a Downton Abbey cast,” takes readers from the English countryside before World War I to 1920s Kenya and 1990s New York City. Clementine “Clemmie” Evans is a successful, overworked attorney whose personal life is a mess. As Clemmie’s ninety-nine-year-old grandmother Addie nears the end of her life, Clemmie stumbles upon a secret from Addie’s past. A family member hints to Clemmie that there may be more to the story than meets the eye, and Clemmie begins to investigate Addie’s life story. Addie grew up in England on her uncle’s estate as a poor orphan taken in by her rich family. Addie and her effervescent cousin Bea grew up to be best friends and close confidants, but with time came change. As Clemmie learns about Addie’s past, it begins to influence her own future. The Ashford Affair is a multi-layered love story that will enchant fans of Kate Morton.

 

What are the odds that two authors would leave behind their popular series and write stand-alone novels set in the same place in the same time? While at a conference, Willig met her friend Deanna Raybourn for cocktails. When the discussion turned to their work, both were surprised to discover that their latest projects were set in 1920s Kenya. Raybourn’s new novel, A Spear of Summer Grass, is the story of Delilah Drummond, a socialite whose family banishes her to Kenya to avoid a scandal. Delilah quickly connects with a group of British ex-pats, but a murder within her group forces Delilah to make an important choice. These two novels are a perfect pairing for a literary getaway.

 

Beth

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A Whole New World

A Whole New World

posted by:
April 26, 2013 - 7:01am

The Golem and the JinniIn her haunting debut novel, author Helene Wecker unfurls an intricately-blended tapestry of Arabian and Jewish folklore, set against the backdrop of turn-of-the-century New York. The Golem and the Jinni combines elements of Syrian mythology and Kabbalistic tradition, rendering a remarkably poignant story of the unlikely friendship between two souls out of time and place.

 

Chava has just arrived in New York and, like many new immigrants, she is alone and friendless. Yet Chava has left no homeland to come to America. She has no family keepsakes or mementos. She is a golem, a magical being made of clay and bound to serve. Brought to waking life aboard a ship bound for America, Chava had little time to know her master, who did not survive the voyage. Now, with the help of a rabbi who recognizes her true nature, Chava struggles to find a place and purpose in this strange land. It has been a thousand years since Ahmad last tasted freedom. A jinni, Ahmad is an elemental creature born of fire. For centuries he roamed the Syrian Desert, his home and source of strength. In his youth, his curiosity about humans often led him to trail after caravans and wandering Bedouins. However, even a fire jinni can fly too close to the sun. When he awakens in a New York tinsmith’s shop, all he can remember of his last encounter with humans is the face of the wizard who imprisoned him. Adrift among people who cannot possibly comprehend his plight, Ahmad searches restlessly for a meaning to the mystery behind his capture.

 

Within the pages of this alluring story, the commonplace rubs shoulders with the fantastical. Freedom of will can become as much a burden to those who hold it as it is a necessity to those deprived. Friendship, redemption and acts of sacrifice often appear from unexpected quarters. This novel is recommended for fans of historical fiction and fantasy.

Meghan

 
 

A Jury of Her Peers

A Jury of Her Peers

posted by:
April 25, 2013 - 8:01am

NWLife After LifeMay We Be ForgivenSince its launch in 1996, the London-based Orange Prize has recognized the achievements of women authors around the world. Organized partly in response to a perceived bias weighted towards male-authored books receiving literary awards, this prize is judged by a committee of women, issues long and short lists of book contenders and ends with one grand winner. As it undergoes a change in sponsorship this year, the 2013 prize is known as The Women’s Prize for Fiction.

 

The 2013 short list was announced on April 16, and includes several titles familiar to Between the Covers readers. Probably the least surprising title to appear on the list is Hilary Mantel’s Bring Up the Bodies. The second in a planned trilogy about Thomas Cromwell, it focuses on the final year of Anne Boleyn’s life and has been heaped with awards and accolades including the Man Booker Prize and the New York Times’ Top Ten Books of 2012. Previous Orange winner and American author Barbara Kingsolver is also named for her book, Flight Behavior. A financially strapped southern family is ready to sell their land to a strip-mining company until they find an immense roost of migratory butterflies has unexpectedly made their mountain a home. New to the prize scene is author Maria Semple, honored for Where’d You Go, Bernadette? A comically satirical look at Seattle and privilege, wife and mother Bernadette has disappeared and it may be up to her daughter to find her.

 

Another Orange Prize winner, Zadie Smith, is back on the list for her book NW. Described as a “story of a city,” Smith writes about friends from northwest London and examines their progress, or lack thereof, on the ladder of social climbing and upward mobility. The final short-listers are Life After Life by Britain’s Kate Atkinson and A.M. Homes’ May We Be Forgiven. Garnering glowing reviews, Atkinson’s tale begins in pre-WWI England and is centered around a character who dies repeatedly only to return to live her same life again with the ability to alter her choices. DC native Homes introduces the brothers Silver.  First-born George’s life is the definition of success--fame, money, a lovely wife and prep school children; younger Harold is a history professor at a community college who moves in on George’s family when George starts to unravel, triggering a calamitous series of events. The complete long list of nominated books can be found on the Women’s Prize website and the winner will be announced on June 5, 2013.

Lori

 
 

Carnegie Medal Shortlist Announced

CanadaThe Round HouseThis is How You Lose HerThe American Library Association has announced the shortlists for the second annual Carnegie Medal. Named after business magnate and renowned Gilded Age philanthropist Andrew Carnegie, who provided a portion of his considerable wealth to the building and promotion of libraries nationwide, these two medals honor the best of the previous year in adult fiction and nonfiction categories. The three nominees in the fiction category are all heavy-hitters: Richard Ford, for Canada, his sprawling novel set both in the wilderness of Montana and north of the border starting in the 1950s; Louise Erdrich's The Round House, a novel that touches on moral and legal issues set in the Ojibwe community, which has already won the National Book Award; and This Is How You Lose Her, a collection of short stories examining the world of relationships, by Pulitzer Prize-winning author Junot Diaz.

 

The nonfiction shortlist also features three strong candidates: The Mansion of Happiness: a History of Life and Death, by Jill Lepore, which takes on the methods we use to examine the big questions of what our mortal time means; National Book Award-winner Timothy Egan for his biography Short Nights of the Shadow Catcher: The Epic Life and Immortal Photographs of Edward Curtis, the portraitist of so many Native Americans; and David Quammen's Spillover: Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic, which investigates the zoonotic microbes that move from animals to humans, such as rabies and ebola. The winners for Excellence in Fiction and Nonfiction will be announced in Chicago on June 30 at the American Library Association annual conference.

Todd

 
 

Mash-Up, Anyone?

Mash-Up, Anyone?

posted by:
April 22, 2013 - 8:15am

Red CountryFantasy fans have much to celebrate when Joe Abercrombie releases a new book and they will not be disappointed with his latest novel, Red Country.  Leave it up to Abercrombie to pull off a successful mash-up of a fantasy and a western. Red Country is fun, bloody and action-packed. His latest will be celebrated by the most ardent Abercrombie fans and is sure to create a new fanbase to add to his legion. While Red Country is a stand- alone novel, fans will recognize several characters from this First Law series. At the center of Red Country is Shy South, a tough-as-nails heroine who is seeking vengeance. Her home has been burned, her brother and sister stolen. She sets off to rescue her siblings and is accompanied by Lamb, her timid stepfather who seems to have a mysterious past.

 

Red Country has everything Abercrombie fans have come to expect: deeply-flawed characters, bloody action, realistic dialogue and lots of black humor. Added to this, the novel also succeeds as a Western, complete with frontier towns, a gold rush, a few duels and more than a few ghosts. Abercrombie is often compared to George R.R. Martin of Game of Thrones fame. He now stands on his own as one of the freshest, most unique voices in fantasy. Together with his First Law trilogy, Red Country is a perfect introduction to readers who have not yet tried Abercrombie’s version of fantasy. Highly recommended for fans of George R.R. Martin and Patrick Rothfuss.

 

Zeke

 
 

A Family Rent Asunder

A Family Rent Asunder

posted by:
April 22, 2013 - 7:55am

Ghana Must GoTaiye Selasi’s debut novel, Ghana Must Go, begins with an end. Sai family patriarch Kweku lies in the dewy grass before dawn, slowly dying in his garden amidst a riot of African color and beauty. Get up, call for help, the reader wants to shout at this Hopkins-educated physician; instead, Kweku passively waits for his heart to stop beating.

 

Selasi’s title refers to the forced expulsion of Ghanaians from neighboring Nigeria as well as to the distinctive, cheap carryall bags in which they stuffed their belongings. Dr. Kweku Sai is from Ghana and his wife Fola is Nigerian. They meet in Pennsylvania where he is completing surgical training and she is in law school. They marry, have four intelligent and driven children, move to Boston, and continue to rack up professional and personal accomplishments. The Sai family epitomizes immigrant success until one unjust and cataclysmic event causes the foundation of the family to crumble and collapse. Written in three sections, “Gone,” “Going,” and lastly “Go,” Selasi allows her characters to reveal the insecurities which enabled their family bonds to stretch, break, and perhaps reform. Recollections, some of which are poignant and others shocking, are integral to understanding each of the family members.

 

This is a story of Africa and of America, of third world attainment and stellar achievements by anyone’s first world standards, and of a family unraveled and lives destroyed. It is a story of putting one foot in front of the other when one foot is in Africa and the other foot stateside. It is a story of leaving and of rebuilding. With its image-rich prose, acidic observations, and perceptive take on family relationships, Ghana Must Go is also very much a story to enjoy.

 

Lori

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