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The Hike

posted by: August 23, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for The HikeFor suburbanite Ben, what starts out as a dull business trip to the Poconos rapidly becomes a horrifying ordeal of epic proportions when he decides to go for The Hike through the local woods. Pursued by a menagerie of monsters through locations found nowhere on Earth, Ben struggles to survive. As he stumbles from one nightmare into the next, he longs for a way to escape the path and return to his family. But to leave the path is to die, and Ben will have to find his way if he ever wants to make it home again.

 

The Hike is a bloody mash-up of genres, as if author Drew Magary threw The Odyssey, Alice in Wonderland and the top 10 B horror movies of all time into a blender to see what would happen. The book is a wild ride from start to finish; once the action starts, it never really lets up. Some of the images are gory, yes, and some of the monsters are really grotesque, but Magary never lets Ben’s experiences on the path descend into the literary equivalent of torture porn. There is a purpose to what Ben is enduring and a destination he has to reach, and the quest-like feel of the narration keeps the plot from being bogged down by too much horror. The violence and heartbreak Ben endures is balanced by Ben’s deadpan humor and determination to see this journey through to the end. The inclusion of some seriously fun characters, including a talking crab, is an added bonus, and there are plenty of surprise twists awaiting Ben and the reader.

 

These twists make The Hike the engaging and fun read that it is, culminating in a shocking revelation right up to the last page. The Hike is a quick read, with enough bizarre world-building and action to make it perfect for any fan of shows like The Twilight Zone, video games like Limbo or podcasts like Welcome to Night Vale.


 
 

The Book of Harlan

posted by: August 18, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Book of HarlanMusic and history entwine in Bernice McFadden’s newest novel, The Book of Harlan, a story of one African American family spanning generations. McFadden found her inspiration for the title character of Harlan from her paternal grandfather, about whom the author says:
 

I never personally knew the man and neither did my father. All I had to recreate his life were a birth certificate, census schedules, a few newspaper articles and my imagination.

 

Emma is the cherished and respectable daughter of a Baptist minister in Macon, Georgia, until carpenter Sam Elliot sweeps her off her feet and, in the oldest story ever, Emma is pregnant. Newly married, Sam and Emma join the Great Migration of African Americans escaping the south and Jim Crow to find a better life, but leave baby Harlan behind with Emma’s parents. Landing in New York City in 1922, America’s prosperity trickles down to the Elliotts, who can finally bring their young son north with them. Harlan develops into a gifted guitarist who thrives in the Harlem Renaissance music scene and his job in a jazz band finds him touring in Paris on the eve of World War II. Hitler’s visions of extermination aren’t limited to Jews, and Harlan and his bandmate Lizard are caught up in an unimaginable nightmare.

 

McFadden does not sugarcoat the lives of the Elliott family, and by extension, the broader African American experience. Poverty, single motherhood, addiction, injustice and race-based prejudice cycle around again and again, making the upward mobility to which the Elliotts aspire a two-steps-forward, one-step-back journey. From the turn-of-the-century segregated south to the Newark riots of 1967, The Book of Harlan offers a sweeping view of 20th century African American life in which the constant is the unbreakable bonds of family and friends. Readers who enjoy Bernice McFadden’s perspective should also try The Turner House by Angela Flournoy.

 


 
 

Celebrities can write too! Explore these books from the rich and famous in this month's BCPL reading challenge. Be sure to share your progress of BCPL's yearlong reading challenge on our Facebook page.

Cover art for 32 Yolks Cover art for Act Like a Lady, Think Like a Man Cover art for The Andy Cohen Diaries Cover art for As You Wish Cover art Change Up Cover art for Cravings Cover art for Every Little Step Cover art for The Girl With the Lower Back Tattoo  Cover art for House of Nails Cover art for If You Ask Me: and Of Course You Won't Cover art for I'm Not A Terrorist, But I've Played One on TV Cover art for In the Country We Love Cover art for Is You Okay? Cover art for It's All Easy Cover art for The Longevity Book Cover art for Mo'Meta Blues Cover art for Choose Your Own Autobiography Cover art for On My Own Cover art for The Pleasure of My Company  Cover art for Seriously... I'm Kidding Cover art for Someday, Someday, Maybe Cover art for The Vegas Diaries Cover art for Why Not Me? Cover art for The Widows Guide to Sex & Dating Cover art for Year of Yes


 
 

Tokyo Ghost

posted by: August 10, 2016 - 8:00am

Cover art for Tokyo GhostThe year is 2089 and humanity’s vices have only grown more severe with time; the only escape from the bleak reality of a world wrecked by pollution is to sugarcoat the dreary with flashy new virtual distractions. The neon-splashed cyberpunk future of Rick Remender and Sean Murphy’s Tokyo Ghost: Vol. 1 is equal parts entertaining and unsettling.

 

Constable Led Dent is a ruthless servant of the criminal overlords running Los Angeles, numbed to the horrendous acts of violence he commits by his seemingly unbreakable addiction to constant artificial audiovisual stimulation. Led’s only remaining link to the real world is his partner and lover, Debbie, whose unwavering dedication to finding a way to get Led clean lands them with a dangerous job in Tokyo, the last bastion of technology-free living in a world obsessed with staying connected.

 

Artist Sean Murphy and colorist Matt Hollingsworth are a flawless art team. Murphy’s dynamic lines and Hollingsworth’s masterful use of texture and color make for page after page of truly jaw-dropping artwork. Frenetic action sequences are rendered in hyper-detailed gory glory, the futuristic media projections are colorful and full of playful nods to current pop culture trends, and the tranquil landscapes of Tokyo stand in stark contrast to the gaudy streets of Los Angeles.

 

Remender often uses his stories to explore topical ideas pushed to their extremes, and Tokyo Ghost is no exception; while the exaggerated technology and over-the-top characters exist firmly in the realm of science fiction, you’re sure to latch onto at least one idea in this book that will make you examine the way that you interact with the world.

 

If you’re as blown away by the art in this book as I was, try The Wake, an Eisner Award-winning series that pairs the same art team with writer Scott Snyder and somehow manages to make fish people scary. Seriously.


 
 

Sleeping Giants

posted by: August 1, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Sleeping GiantsSleeping Giants by Sylvain Neuvel is a captivating new science fiction novel about a giant metal robot whose parts are strewn across different parts of the earth and the physicist determined to uncover its origins and purpose. Dr. Rose Franklin encountered the robot firsthand when she was a young girl. She was riding her bike when, suddenly, she fell through the ground and into the palm of a giant metal hand. Rose slowly learns that the hand is just one of many robot parts being discovered around the world, but it’s not clear what these robots were meant for. Making human lives easier? Destroying human lives? The story is told in journal entries, interviews and transcripts, so the reader feels the suspense of trying to piece the story together. Each interviewer and interviewee shares a new perspective to this mystery, and the results unfold at a thrilling pace.

 

This novel is engaging and moves quickly. Its realistic premise makes it a great read for fans of The Martian and science fiction lovers. Although the scientific and robotic concepts are realistic, the language and style of the story are easily digestible. Neuvel has an education in linguistics and a background as a software engineer, so his story is fun to both read and speculate about. It's the first book in a new series, so readers who enjoy this book can look forward to the next installment Walking Gods, coming out in April 2017.

 


 
 

Missing, Presumed

posted by: July 27, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Missing, PresumedWhen Detective Sergeant Manon Bradshaw arrives on the scene of the crime, the door is hanging open, there is an abandoned coat in the foyer and broken glass and blood splatter in the kitchen. These are the only clues to track in Missing, Presumed by Susie Steiner. The victim is Ph.D. candidate Edith Hind, daughter of eminent surgeon Sir Ian Hind. Sir Ian is highly connected, but despite pressure from the Home Secretary, there are very few clues to follow, and time is running out for Edith and the Cambridgeshire Police.

 

Manon’s frustration grows as the first 72 hours — considered the most vital in a missing person’s case — seep away. As the press circles the scene like vultures, devouring the most salacious details of Edith’s love life, Manon’s team scrambles to gather more clues. With the clock ticking and pressure on every side, Manon must delve the deepest secrets of a very private prominent family to unearth what really happened to Edith.

 

Steiner uses multiple perspectives from different characters to create a wholly believable story with psychological depth. She develops the characters through their distinct eccentricities; Manon listens to a police scanner to ease herself to sleep, her colleague Davy peppers police jargon throughout his conversations and the missing Edith can recycle anything into an art project. One revelation after another brings you to a conclusion you do not see coming. This police procedural has all the elements of a riveting psychological thriller. Missing, Presumed is a beautifully written novel by an up-and-coming writer.

 


 
 

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