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Murders Old and New

Murders Old and New

posted by:
August 10, 2012 - 7:00am

Age of DoubtThe Age of Doubt by Andrea Camilleri is the latest mystery novel involving Sicilian detective Inspector Salvo Montalbano. There is a heavy rain, and the inspector is making his way to work when he comes across a young woman whose car is about to become submerged in water.  He rescues her and takes her home to dry off, and she tells him a story of a wealthy aunt, a luxury yacht and a speedboat that is docked in the port of Vigata. Soon after, the owner of the yacht calls the police as a dinghy has been discovered carrying a disfigured corpse. Montalbano heads to the scene and must discover the identity of the unknown man and if there is any connection between him and the crew of the yacht. He remembers the mysterious woman, but when he tries to locate her, he finds that she has mysteriously vanished. Told with a wry sense of humor, the reader will definitely enjoy Montalbano’s quirky style, his passion for Sicilian food and his romantic endeavors. He often uses non-traditional methods in solving the case, and there is enough action and suspense to keep the reader guessing.

 

In the novel, Camilleri also pays homage to the classic mystery writer Georges Simenon who published nearly 200 novels in his lifetime. Inspector Jules Maigret was his most famous character, and in Maigret and the Man on the Boulevard, Maigret must tackle the case of a man who was stabbed to death in an alley, but his wife insists that the shoes and tie he was wearing at the time of his death could not be his. Camilleri writes in a similar style to Simenon, the novels are light and breezy and make an interesting diversion featuring an exotic locale.

 

If you are in the mood for something new or wish to return to a classic tale, these mysteries would be perfect for the dog days of summer.

 

Doug

 
 

A Cautionary Tale

A Cautionary Tale

posted by:
July 24, 2012 - 7:00am

GetawayIn Getaway by Lisa Brackmann, we meet recently widowed Michelle Mason, at loose ends due to her late husband’s disastrous financial dealings that left her almost penniless. They had a pre-arranged vacation planned in Puerto Vallarta and Michelle decides to head there for a short vacation. One night, she meets a handsome stranger named Daniel and after too many margaritas she invites him to spend the night in her hotel room. By morning, the hotel has been broken into by two masked goons who seem to have a grudge with Daniel. Michelle tries to return home, but a mysterious “package” is planted in her handbag and she is forced to stay in Mexico. She is rescued by Gary, who has some connection to Daniel and appears to be in possession of her passport. Gary forces Michelle into a dangerous game of espionage and it soon becomes apparent that she has no one she can trust. For a widow alone in Mexico, what is a woman to do?

 

Brackmann creates a wonderfully wild and incredibly readable thriller with Getaway. The setting and descriptions of Puerto Vallarta make this a perfect summer read for sitting on a beach or the balcony of a cruise ship. The suspense builds quickly and intensifies to the point where the reader will need to turn the pages quickly to get to the end. Michelle is a likeable heroine, with enough pluck and vigor to be able to weasel out of dire situations. Getaway is great for readers who like to follow a strong female who refuses the role of victim. 

Doug

categories:

 
 

Thriller Award Winners Announced

Spiral11/22/63Winners of the 2012 Thriller Awards were recently honored at a gala held by the International Thriller Writers. Recipients included some old favorites as well as some newcomers.

Cornell physics professor Paul McEuen won the award for Best First Novel for his smart new techno-thriller Spiral. When Nobel laureate and nanoscience expert Liam Connor is found dead at the bottom of a gorge, neither his colleague Jake nor his granddaughter Maggie believe that his death was a suicide. They begin to search for answers and find encoded messages from Liam that divulge his secret knowledge of a biological weapon called “Uzumaki” (Japanese for spiral) dating back to World War II. Jake and Maggie must join together to search for the killer and stop a deadly terrorist attack.

 

Stephen King’s 11/22/63 took the award for Best Hard Cover Novel. Jake Epping finds out that the storeroom at a local diner is a portal to 11:58 a.m. on September 9, 1958. Jake agrees to take go back in time to stop the Kennedy assassination to honor a friend’s dying wish. After going back in time, he embarks on a new life as George Amberson in a small Texas town near Dallas and falls in love with a woman named Sadie. As 11/22/63, the date in question, draws closer, Jake races to stop the assassination. Can he really change history?

 

Other honorees included fan favorites Jack Higgins, Ann Rule, and Richard North Patterson. The complete list of winners is available here.

 

Beth

 
 

Beltway Underbelly

Beltway Underbelly

posted by:
July 20, 2012 - 7:00am

The 500Matthew Quirk’s first novel, The 500, refers to the elite men and women who really control Washington D.C. and therefore the world. One man involved with these power players is Mike Ford, a young recent law school graduate. Mike was recruited while at Harvard Law School to join the Davies Group, Washington’s most powerful consulting firm. Mike’s job has him rubbing shoulders with the members of this selective circle which contrasts wildly with his upbringing spent in the realm of small-time con men.

 

As a child, Mike’s father taught him the intrinsic lessons of grifting, identifying marks, and manipulation. Mike wanted out and knew his best chance was through education. Hard work in college and law school was his ticket to the straight and narrow – or so he thought. He soon learns that crooks transcend social strata and becomes embroiled in a high stakes con game. As Mike ascends the Davies Group’s hierarchy, he gradually realizes that his employer is supporting a sinister political conspiracy. 

 

This thrilling debut offers political intrigue, fast-paced action, humor, and a likeable and strong leading man. As a former reporter for Atlantic Magazine, Quirk nails the details of the politics and setting of Washington D.C. and is being hailed as the next John Grisham. The 500 will have international appeal as it has already been translated into twenty languages and Quirk is hard at work on a sequel. Additionally, movie rights were sold just days after the book, so put your casting cap on as you read this potential future blockbuster!

 

Maureen

 
 

The Key to Immortality

The Key to Immortality

posted by:
July 13, 2012 - 7:10am

Blood LineJames Rollins was inspired to write Bloodline, the eighth novel in his Sigma series, after reading a Time article titled “2045: The Year Man Becomes Immortal.”  The article intrigued Rollins and led him to research the idea and possibility of life extension through science and technology. The resulting novel weaves genetics, history, action, and technology into a pulse-pounding conspiracy story that is impossible to put down. 

 

Amanda Gant-Bennett, the President’s pregnant daughter, is kidnapped by Somali pirates, so Sigma Force, a group of elite covert operators, is called in to rescue her. The rescue team soon finds that this is no ordinary political kidnapping. Amanda is really a pawn in a much larger, more dangerous game. Their investigation leads them to a South Carolina fertility clinic where a horrific project merging technology and biology is hidden. From there, the team uncovers a powerful family's ancient secret that could lead to immortality for humans, and the Sigma team begins a race against time to uncover the mystery and save the life of a baby who may be the key to it all.

 

One of the most unique things about this book is the addition of Army Ranger Captain Tucker Wayne and his military war dog, Kane, to the Sigma team. The partnership between dog and handler is rich and well-developed. Before his career as a writer, Rollins was a practicing veterinarian, and he writes many scenes from Kane’s dog's eye view. To learn more about other remarkable canines like Kane, try Soldier Dogs: The Untold Story of America’s Canine Heroes by Maria Goodavage.

 

Beth

categories:

 
 

Names Can Be Deceiving

Names Can Be Deceiving

posted by:
July 2, 2012 - 7:30am

NicevilleSomething dark and sinister is happening in Niceville, the newest book by Carsten Stroud. On the surface, this is a lovely old community in the Deep South. Niceville is filled with beautiful Victorian houses on streets lined with majestic live oak trees, decorated in drapes of Spanish moss. Many of the inhabitants are descendants of the original four families, which founded the town in 1764. However, there is an underlying current of malevolence in this picturesque hamlet. Something evil transpired in the past and it continues to haunt the residents. 

 

The story begins with the disappearance of a child on his way home from school. A surveillance camera records his last sighting outside of a pawnshop, and an instant later he vanishes. Readers discover that Niceville has an exorbitantly high number of missing persons’ cases, all relatives of the founding families. Even more questions are raised when the child is discovered ten days later, alive, in a sealed crypt. Additional storylines involve a horrific traffic accident, a bank robbery and the murder of multiple police officers, blackmail, and espionage.

 

An ominous presence seems to envelope Niceville, bringing out the worst in its inhabitants. This novel is a unique blend of supernatural thriller, crime drama, and mystery. Stroud cleverly weaves all of the disparate storylines together into a compelling read.  Niceville is certain to be a popular book club selection, with the assurance of lively discussions regarding the many intriguing aspects of this tale.

 

Jeanne

 
 

Double Trouble

Double Trouble

posted by:
June 29, 2012 - 7:30am

Gone, GirlCanadaEagerly anticipated by readers, Pulitzer prize winner Richard Ford and best-selling suspense writer Gillian Flynn have each released a new book in time for summer reading. Flynn’s Gone Girl is a dually narrated tale of a marriage gone wrong with a thriller's edge. Ford’s latest novel, Canada, is a coming of age tale from a master wordsmith.

 

In Gone Girl, we are introduced to couple Nick and Amy. Once darling newlywed writers living a charmed life in New York City, they’ve relocated to Nick’s decidedly less urbane Missouri hometown after the rise of the internet leads to the demise of their magazine employers. Nick buys a neighborhood bar with his twin sister Margo while unemployed Amy chafes at the constraints of a small town lifestyle. Amy disappears and naturally, husband Nick becomes the prime suspect. The couple takes turns telling the story; Nick’s present tense accounts alternate with the backstory provided by Amy’s journal entries. Fans of Gillian Flynn know she does not write for the gentle reader, as her style is taut with sharp edges, raw language, and keen observations into the darker, hidden bits of the human psyche.

 

In Canada, Richard Ford also introduces a set of twins, Dell and Berner, brother and sister respectively. Author of the lauded Bascombe trilogy, Ford’s prose is clear and direct without being spare and complements both the prairie setting and plot-driven story recounted by Dell.  The Montana twins’ parents uncharacteristically rob a bank and end up in jail; Berner runs off, leaving Dell to be smuggled over to an unsavory family friend in Saskatchewan. Dell’s journey becomes more than a trip across the border as he comes to terms with his parents’ actions, loss of family, and a new, unasked-for life on a rough fringe of society.

 

Lori

 
 

Love, Loss, and Murder

Love, Loss, and Murder

posted by:
June 19, 2012 - 7:01am

A Deeper DarknessJ.T. Ellison’s A Deeper Darkness is a thriller that pulls the reader deeper and deeper into the story with its well-paced suspense and complex characters.

 

Ex-Army Ranger Eddie Donovan was murdered in an apparent carjacking, but his mother doesn’t believe that is all there is to the story. She asks Eddie’s ex-girlfriend Dr. Samantha Owens, who is now the head medical examiner for the state of Tennessee, to come to Washington, D. C. and perform a second autopsy. What Sam finds pulls her into the center of an investigation that she never could have expected. 

 

Both Eddie and another man from his Army Rangers unit have been murdered in Washington, D.C., and the ballistics show that they were shot with the same gun. In Virginia, another man from their unit killed his mother and committed suicide. Only one man remains from the group of friends who served together. Off-the-grid loner Xander Whitfield is either the key to solving the murders or the prime suspect for all of them. Something happened in Afghanistan that the group covered up, but this secret won’t stay buried.

 

A Deeper Darkness is a heart-pounding thriller, but it is also a story of love and loss. Sam’s husband and two young children were killed in the floods in Nashville in 2010, and she is struggling with her grief for the family she lost. She has developed OCD that she tries to ignore, but the mounting pressure from this case pushes her struggle to the forefront of her life. This is the first novel in a new series, so readers will get to follow Sam as she continues to heal.

Beth

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A Summer Hit Parade

A Summer Hit Parade

posted by:
June 1, 2012 - 12:01am

The Red HouseBroken HarborHeading Out to WonderfulThe upcoming reading forecast looks promising as several bestselling authors release new titles. Mark Haddon, Tana French, and Robert Goolrick each have a new book coming to BCPL in June or July. Get ahead of your summer reading and put one or more of these on reserve now.

 

Mark Haddon made a splash several years ago with his story, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime, which he told from the point of view of a boy with autism.  Haddon is known for his keen depictions of internal dialogue which bodes well for his newest book, The Red House. Posh Mark invites his sister Angela and her brood to spend a week with his new wife and stepdaughter at an English country house in a belated attempt at family bonding. Told in each of the eight different vacationers’ voices, Haddon illustrates how little of ourselves we reveal even to those who would claim to know us best.

 

Irish author Tana French writes suspense fiction with an edgy psychological angle. Her debut In the Woods won mystery’s Edgar award and introduced her crime-solving Dublin police department. Her fourth title, Broken Harbor, features murder squad Detective Sergeant Mick Kennedy. He is investigating the grisly deaths of a squeaky-clean suburban father and children as the mother’s life hangs by a thread in intensive care. Solving this crime requires Kennedy to revisit the tragic events of his own childhood…but will he be able to maintain the requisite objectivity to find the killer?

 

Robert Goolrick’s taut and twisty tale of obsession and passion (no, it is NOT a Fifty Shades of Grey read-alike,) The Reliable Wife made him a book club circuit darling. In his next book, Heading Out to Wonderful, he once again excels at setting a vivid scene, this time in small town Virginia. Outsider Charlie Beale arrives to settle down in the hamlet of Brownsburg but an entanglement with the lovely wife of the wealthiest man in town escalates into a fervor with far-reaching consequences.

Lori

 
 

The World’s Greatest Crime Fiction Writer?

TakenAccording to The Huffington Post, it’s Robert Crais. You can judge for yourself with Taken, the most recent in his Joe Pike/Elvis Cole series. Taken features a multinational cast of bad guys who buy, sell, and steal one another's kidnapped victims. When professional kidnappers capture a college-age couple who venture into the desert south of Palm Springs near the Mexican border, the young woman's mother hires Cole to find them. Initially, Mom thinks it’s a hoax to get at her money, but Cole quickly realizes that it’s for real and the danger is serious.

 

Through a series of undercover efforts, Cole, Pike, and their sidekick Jon Stone begin to unravel the power balance controlling this web of cartels. As they move to infiltrate the smugglers’ group, Cole himself becomes a kidnap victim. Pike and Stone must find a way to use his capture to aid their investigation and bring justice to the victims. This quickly moving story and realistically sharp dialog will keep readers up past their bedtime. Fans of Crais as well as general mystery readers will enjoy this latest effort. For series newcomers, it is not critical to start with the first title. Crais himself even recommends starting with a title in the middle of the series: L.A. Requiem. The good news is once you’ve polished this one off, there are 14 others waiting in the stacks.

 

While the titles in this series would make a fabulous fit for the big screen, to date Crais refuses to sell the rights to Cole, Pike, and his other recurring characters, preferring to allow his readers to keep their own personal conceptions of the characters.

Maureen