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Girls Gone Bad

Girls Gone Bad

posted by:
August 30, 2013 - 7:00am

The Wicked Girls cover artThe murder of a child is always shocking, and child killers even more so. In The Wicked Girls, Alex Marwood debuts with a gritty, psychological crime story about two British women trying to outrun their past. For Kirsty Lindsay and Amber Gordon, two girls from the same neighborhood but different worlds, their lives changed permanently one fateful afternoon when they were 11 and committed a horrendous crime against a child. After serving their time, they were given new identities and a chance to forge a new life. Amber, who drew a rougher lot as far as juvenile detention facilities go, eventually becomes a cleaning supervisor at a faded beach town amusement park. Kirsty is a successful journalist with a comfortable home and family, although recently the recession has put a strain on her career and finances. When a string of murders suddenly happens in the town where Amber lives, the two women are unexpectedly brought face-to-face, their shared past threatening to overwhelm them in new ways.
 

Marwood has constructed a gripping plot with shifting characters and twists like the maze of fun house mirrors in Amber’s amusement park. The backgrounds and dark secrets of the characters are balanced with the crime itself, making this a good choice for readers who like well-developed characters and relationships as well as crime drama. Ambiguous and not at all reassuring, this novel examines social structures and the criminal justice system and questions whether someone should be forever indebted to society for a past mistake. Until the last pages, readers are left wondering if the girls’ crime was accidental or the work of cold-blooded killers. Fans of Rosamund Lupton or Gillian Flynn will appreciate this murky, suspenseful story of flawed characters desperately grasping for normalcy.
 

Melanie

 
 

A Cry for Help

A Cry for Help

posted by:
August 29, 2013 - 7:00am

A Conspiracy of Faith cover artA bottle is discovered off of the coast of Scotland. Inside is a message written in blood. Once it's determined that note is written in Icelandic, the case becomes another mystery for Department Q. A Conspiracy of Faith is the third Department Q novel written by Jussi Adler-Olsen and is the winner of the Nordic crime-writing honor The Glass Key Award. He is in excellent company as previous winners have included Stieg Larsson, Jo Nesbo and Henning Mankell. Readers who enjoy these authors won’t want to miss out on this thrilling story.
 

A Conspiracy of Faith follows two primary storylines. Detective Carl Morck and his team work to decipher the damaged and decaying note found in the bottle and determine the identity of the author. Simultaneously, the reader follows a serial killer as he methodically plans to take his next victims. Although the message is determined to be several years old, Department Q works to find its origin, completely unaware that a similar crime is about to occur at the same location.
 

Jussi Adler-Olsen creates a cast of characters that are as real as they are complex. He establishes an authentic police environment as well as interesting interpersonal relationships, which draw the reader into the story. The novel moves along at an exciting pace and builds in intensity towards the dynamic conclusion.

Jeanne

 
 

Something Wicked

Something Wicked

posted by:
August 28, 2013 - 7:00am

Night Film book coverNight Film by Marisha Pessl will be one of the most talked about books of the fall. This new thriller is riveting, impossible to put down and hair-raisingly creepy.
 

It's the story of a washed-up journalist ruined by the story that got away. Scott McGrath was once a successful investigative journalist who tracked down the darkest, seediest stories. The one elusive target that cost him his career was film director Michael Cordova. Cordova is the director of dark, transgressive films that are so disturbing they cannot be played in theaters. The films are only rarely shown at secret screenings in tunnels around the world.
 

During his initial investigation of Cordova, McGrath got a lead that the secretive film director may be hurting children. McGrath went public with the accusation and was subsequently sued by Cordova’s team of lawyers. Since he had no definitive proof, his career as a journalist was essentially over.
 

Fast-forward several years later. Cordova’s daughter, Ashley, has just committed suicide under mysterious circumstances, and McGrath again becomes obsessed with the dark, twisted world of the Cordovas. Follow McGrath into the world of Michael Cordova where reality is elusive and dark forces may be at work.
 

Pessl’s unique style will be one of the first things readers notice. She spins her dark labyrinthine tale by interspersing newspaper and website clippings throughout the book. The technique pulls the reader further into the book and adds to the overall authenticity of her story.
 

Readers who like creepy, disturbing stories will relish the dark paths McGrath will take to find the truth.

Zeke

 
 

On Being a Man Amongst Gods

Hawkeye: Little Hits CoverSuperheroes in general are reaching new heights of popularity and, with an unbroken string of cinematic hits, that is especially true of the heroes of the Marvel Universe. Matt Fraction is one of the hottest comic book writers in the industry today, known for his cool, hip and edgy take on characters like the Fantastic Four, X-Men, Iron Fist, Thor and Iron Man. It is his work on another Avengers team member that is creating the buzz now. In Hawkeye Vol 2: Little Hits, Fraction and artist David Aja prove the quirky, wild fun they began in Hawkeye Vol 1: My Life as a Weapon was no fluke.
 

Hawkeye, or “hawkguy” as many of his neighbors insist on calling him, is a mere mortal on a team of gods, geniuses and super-soldiers. He has been a thief, a carney, a hero, and in the cinematic version, a highly trained government agent and assassin. Fraction clearly aims to tie all these threads together, or as he states in the first issue of the series, “…this is what he does when he is not being an Avenger…” Fraction’s Hawkeye lives in an apartment in Brooklyn, where most of his neighbors seem to know who he is and what he does for a living. When his neighbors face eviction at the hands of a local slum lord backed by an Eastern European mob, Hawkeye comes to the rescue in a way that is both hilarious and has long-term — and ever increasing — repercussions.
 

You almost never see Hawkeye in costume in this series and, while he crosses paths with villains, it tends to be inadvertent. The art and color scheme of these two books tie them together and give an overall “Mod,” almost 1960s feel, while still being completely modern. This series, while reflecting the cinematic Hawkeye more, are definitely written with adults in mind. This is a series for mature readers, as many of the situations and dialogue are not child-friendly. Fraction enjoys dropping the reader — and his hero — into the middle of action at the start of each issue, with Hawkeye uttering the phrase “Okay, this looks bad.” The worse things look for Hawkeye the more fun it is for the reader as Fraction takes us on a wild ride.
 

Hawkeye: Little Hits is just as strong as the first volume and continues the theme that you can be a hero and still be a train wreck at the same time. Fraction’s Hawkeye seems to embody the Jeremy Renner’s Hawkeye from the Saturday Night Live sketch, spoofing the climactic battle from The Avengers movie when Renner turns to Captain America and says “I’m all out of arrows, I don’t have any more…so, uh, I guess I’m done, right? All right, I’ll be in the car. Stay safe!”

Brian

 
 

Never Ever

Never Ever

posted by:
August 13, 2013 - 7:00am

The Never ListNever trust a stranger with a flat tire. Never park more than six spaces from your destination. Never be stranded. In Koethi Zan’s debut thriller The Never List, Sarah and her best friend Jennifer became obsessed with creating what they called the Never List after they were in a car accident when they were 12. The list was their own guide to avoiding anything that might lead them into danger. Throughout their teen years, they studied statistics and filled notebooks with rules to help them avoid situations that might make them vulnerable. Even though the girls were vigilant about following their rules, the unthinkable happened, and they were abducted. Sarah never saw Jennifer again.

 

Ten years later, Sarah has a new identity. She rarely leaves her New York City apartment, choosing to remain in her safe haven whenever possible. When she learns that her sadistic captor is up for parole, she becomes obsessed with understanding the clues that she thinks he has hidden in his recent letters. This sends Sarah on a journey to try to find evidence that will keep him in jail. The Never List is a gripping psychological thriller. Sarah’s terror is palpable in the first-person narrative. Zan slowly doles out the details of the kidnapping as the book progresses, leaving the reader breathlessly awaiting the next piece of the puzzle.

 

Although it was written over two years ago, this novel contains eerie similarities to the Ariel Castro case, in which he kidnapped and held his victims for more than a decade. Zan was shocked by the parallels. She addressed the astonishing coincidence in this recent interview.

Beth

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Underground Clairvoyant Syndicate

The Bone Season cover image“Is Samantha Shannon the next J.K. Rowling?” That's the question asked in the July 15th edition of Forbes magazine. Shannon’s debut novel, The Bone Season, is the first in what's expected to be a seven-part series. The novel begins in an alternate universe in the year 2059, about 200 years after a plague covered the planet causing some of the population to become clairvoyant. In the world Shannon has created, there are guards who protect the Scion city of London from clairvoyants because the general population has been told that clairvoyants are dangerous. This futuristic world is a totalitarian society where clairvoyants have to hide their abilities and are treated as criminals.
 

Paige Mahoney is the 19-year-old protagonist of this science fiction thriller. She is called the "Pale Dreamer" because she’s a dream walker, a rare form of clairvoyant. All clairvoyants have a specialty, an area of the sixth sense at which they excel, and Paige’s spirit is able to leave her body and travel into the aether to visit the thoughts and dreams of others. She uses her gift for an underground crime syndicate that employs clairvoyants in a variety of ways depending on their abilities. The lifestyle allows Paige to be around others like her and not feel ashamed of her gifts.
 

The Pale Dreamer’s world is thrown into chaos when underguards discover that she is clairvoyant. She is taken captive and detained with others who have similar abilities. She must learn about herself and her gift in order to regain her freedom, but the task is greater than it seems and failing isn’t an option.
 

This is an incredibly unique book by a debut author. According to The Bone Season’s website, the book’s movie rights have already been claimed by The Imaginarium studios.

Randalee

 
 

Victorian Violence

Victorian Violence

posted by:
July 26, 2013 - 7:55am

Cover art for Murder as a Fine ArtLove learning new things while also reading a page-turning historical thriller? Check out David Morrell’s Murder as a Fine Art.  Set in Victorian England, Morrell’s “hero” is the essayist Thomas De Quincey, author of Confessions of an Opium Eater.

 

A heinous crime is committed in 1854, England. The gruesome methods of the crime are lifted directly from a De Quincey essay, “On Murder Considered as One of the Fine Arts.” As it happens, De Quincey and his daughter Emily were in England at the time of the murder. He suddenly becomes a prime suspect. With the help of a couple of Scotland Yard detectives, it will be up to De Quincey and Emily to prove his innocence and find the killer.

 

De Quincey is a fascinating historical figure. He wrote about the inner psyche decades before Sigmund Freud and was surrounded by artistic friends such as William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge.

 

Murder as a Fine Art is one part novel and one part history lesson. Scotland Yard was still relatively new, and investigative techniques were still rather primitive. Morrell gives his readers a real sense of Victorian England, with its straight-laced exterior hiding a dark underbelly of vice.

 

For additional historical thrillers set in the Victorian era, check out The Alienist by Caleb Carr and Alex Grecian’s The Yard. For an excellent nonfiction treatment of crime in the Victorian era, see Kate Summerscale’s The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher: A Shocking Murder and the Undoing of a Great Victorian Detective.
 

Zeke

 
 

Love's Labor

Love's Labor

posted by:
July 26, 2013 - 7:55am

Cover art for Close My EyesAnguish over the loss of a child is life altering and permanent. Just suppose, years later, a stranger tells you that your child may still be alive. That unimaginable scenario greets Geniver (Gen) Loxley in Sophie McKenzie’s tightly wound new thriller Close My Eyes, where the still grieving mother's encounter with an unexpected visitor leads to an unthinkable possibility.

 

After eight long years, life is standing still for the childless Gen.  Despite a comfortable, albeit boring, life with her ambitious and devoted husband Art, the former writer and part-time teacher can't seem to move past the death of her stillborn daughter, Beth. When Gen's husband suggests they keep trying for another child his sullen wife resists. Then one day out of the blue, a woman appears at their door with an incredible accusation: the Loxley baby was born alive and healthy. For the fragile Gen, it is about as cruel a joke as possible. Her emotional unraveling worries her husband and her best friend, both of whom dismiss outright the stranger's claims.  When one coincidence too many does not add up, Gen plummets into a wave of confusion and doubt. What really did happen in the operating room years earlier? It is true; she never saw her dead daughter. As she sets out to revisit the past she discovers an equally devastating reality may await her.

 

The London-born McKenzie, whose previous works included children and teen novels published in the United Kingdom, has crafted a roller coaster plot with flawed characters and a disturbing narrative. Fans of last summer's mega-hit Gone Girl will be hooked by another enticing and twisty psychological thriller that visits a dark place with unsettling consequences. It is not likely to disappoint.

Cynthia

 
 

In Search Of

In Search Of

posted by:
July 15, 2013 - 7:45am

Out of RangeCharlie Davis is a political reporter for the Los Angeles Times, but becomes an investigator in search of his wife when she goes missing. Out of Range by Hank Steinberg is an action-packed adventure that leads Charlie and readers to Uzbekistan, the country where Charlie and his wife Julie fell in love. Six years ago, the young couple lived happily in Uzbekistan where he worked as a reporter and they were awaiting the birth of their first child. But tragedy soon struck as they were caught up in a massacre which wounded them both and took the life of their friends’ young son. Following that brush with death, Charlie resolved to keep his family safe. They returned to the security of the States and Charlie began his staid job at the Times.

 

Fast forward six years and the danger has resurfaced. While on a trip to Disneyland with their two children, Julie is forced from her car and vanishes. Following Julie’s kidnapping, Charlie becomes the police’s primary focus. Since the cops aren’t on the right trail, Charlie is determined to find out who took his wife. While investigating Julie’s days leading up to the disappearance, he finds clues indicating that perhaps Julie wasn’t the happy stay-at-home mom he thought she was. She’s been hiding secrets which now threaten her entire family. All roads lead Charlie back to Uzbekistan, and while attempting to rescue his wife, he must thwart a terrorist plot, outsmart his own kidnappers, and deal with MI6.

 

This debut thriller is from the creator of the television series Without a Trace. Steinberg illustrates the dangerous world of international espionage in a fast-paced tale that is full of twists and turns with an intriguing cast of characters.    

 

Maureen

 
 

Countdown to X-Day

Countdown to X-Day

posted by:
July 5, 2013 - 7:50am

The Execution of Noa P. SingletonElizabeth L. Silver’s debut novel The Execution of Noa P. Singleton is the kind of book that leaves the reader thinking about it long after finishing the last page. As the story begins, Noa is on death row awaiting X-Day, the day of her execution, when Marlene Dixon, the mother of her victim Sarah, approaches her. Marlene is a prominent Philadelphia attorney who tells Noa that she has changed her stance on the death penalty. Marlene says that she has formed a new nonprofit organization called Mothers Against Death, and she offers to petition for clemency on Noa’s behalf. What she really wants is for Noa to explain why she shot Sarah. During her trial and sentencing, Noa did not speak to defend herself. She did not offer any explanation for Sarah’s death.

 

The story is told through narratives written by Noa as X-Day approaches and letters that Marlene writes to Sarah at the same time. The truth is a murky thing that Silver slowly reveals over the course of the novel. The idea that both guilt and innocence exist on a spectrum is at the heart of the story. Neither of the women is what she seems to be in the beginning, and both share the burden of guilt to some degree. As Noa’s execution draws near, the reader realizes the complexity of the situation and must consider the difference between moral guilt and legal guilt. The Execution of Noa P. Singleton is a complex, character-driven psychological thriller that will yield heated discussions at your next book club meeting.

Beth