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Bryant & May and the Burning Man

posted by: March 22, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Bryant & May and the Burning ManA ramshackle building in the heart of London houses the Peculiar Crimes Unit, a division of the London police force established during World War II to solve crimes that could have a detrimental impact on public morale. Author Christopher Fowler proves there is no shortage of peculiar crimes in his latest mystery Bryant & May and the Burning Man.

 

It takes unusual detectives to delve into the minds of unique killers, and none are more unusual than this pair. Bryant is brilliant, unconventional and possesses a biting sense humor. May is erudite, refined and equally gifted. This pair has been together since the war, cultivating a reputation for unconventional means and defying police procedure. They are just as likely to consult a clairvoyant as a forensic pathologist.

 

In the wake of an insider-trading scandal, thousands of rioters have turned London’s financial district into a war zone. A vengeful pyromaniac decides to cleanse the world of greedy graspers who prey on the working stiffs. Under the cover of the chaos, he stalks the victims, using their personal habits to exact revenge. Bryant insists the murders are linked to the financial scandal, but he is unable to convince the brass, who are convinced that Bryant has finally gone ‘round the bend.

 

Fowler brilliantly intersperses the history of the city throughout his work, providing the background for Guy Fawkes Day while simultaneously heightening the tension. The humor is smart, incisive and wry. While this is the 12th Bryant & May entry, these books are not designed to be read in order. Each book is a standalone delight. The relationship between the two detectives is poignant without being maudlin. We are left hoping that someday, like Bryant and May, we will not go gently into that good night.

 


 
 

What She Left

posted by: March 22, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for What She LeftIn T.R. Richmond’s latest novel What She Left, speculation runs rampant when reporter Alice Salmon’s body washes up on the riverbank by a London university. Murder, suicide or an accident? Any explanation seems plausible to the multitudes of computer-chair sleuths competing for attention over Facebook, newspaper forums and Twitter. Delving into every word written about Alice is Dr. Jeremy Cooke, an anthropology professor who is making it his business to write a book about her life and death.

 

Told through a series of letters, texts, emails and social media posts, Cooke’s obsession with his former student Alice is detailed in his letters to his longtime friend Larry. He puts together a single hypothesis: whereas in the past, a person left behind a birth certificate, a death certificate and perhaps a few photos and letters, at no other time in human history does a person leave such a substantial and overwhelming media footprint. In the deluge of information, he seeks to put together a full picture of her short life and, in doing so, solve her death.

 

But Cooke’s research leads to some resistance, both from Alice’s family and friends, and from an unnamed, dangerously aggressive source who wants no part of the story to be unearthed. As the mystery of Alice Salmon’s death unfolds, both in real life and on the Internet, many suspects emerge as culpable, even Alice herself.

 

 

Part fascinating social experiment into what makes our 21st century existence exciting and part mystery, this new novel will keep readers engaged until the very last letter. Those who enjoyed Donna Tartt’s debut The Secret History or, more recently, Black Chalk by Christopher Yates, will find this twisting narrative a great read.


 
 

The Quality of Silence

posted by: March 8, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Quality of SilenceNorthern Alaska in winter…your dream destination? Probably not, but it is the perfect setting for Rosamund Lupton’s latest thriller The Quality of Silence. A fast-paced, bone-chilling tale about a mother and daughter who trek through northern Alaska to find her missing husband that includes a wild ride in a hijacked tractor trailer to the Arctic Circle (complete with menacing stalkers), threats of hypothermia, a blizzard and fear at every turn.

 

What would you do if you were told your husband was killed in a fire at a remote northern Alaskan village? Would you hijack a tractor trailer to drive through Alaska’s most treacherous landscape with your 10-year-old deaf daughter? Believing her husband Matt is alive and alone in the desolate, frozen tundra, Yasmin is determined to find him despite the bitter cold, constant darkness and barely passable snow-covered roads. But her and her daughter, Ruby, must also outrun the truck keeping pace behind them, and then there are the cryptic emails from an unknown sender. Who is following them? Who is sending the emails? And why? Unrelenting fear presses down on Yasmin and Ruby not only from outside factors but from the silence they experience as well. Will they conquer their fears? Will they find Matt? Will they survive?

 

Grab a cozy blanket and something warm to drink, for Lupton’s description of northern Alaska will make you shiver, both from cold and fright. You will urgently read this icy page-turner to find out what happens to Matt, Yasmin and Ruby. After warming up, go to Lupton's website for photos of her recent trip to Alaska. Interesting, believe me! Still want more Lupton? Then check out her other moving and suspenseful novels, Sister and Afterwards. Both great reads!


 
 

Miss Ruffles Inherits Everything

posted by: March 3, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Miss Ruffles Inherits EverythingTake one unemployed Yankee, transplant her to Mule Stop, Texas, dig up a job with an eccentric millionaire and you have all the delightful elements of Nancy Martin’s debut mystery Miss Ruffles Inherits Everything. Sunny McKillip moved to Mule Stop expecting to be an administrative assistant at a university. When the job disappears, Sunny is fortunate to land a position with the most influential matriarch in town, Honeybelle Hensley. Miss Honeybelle is president of the garden club and has the most beautiful rose garden south of the Mason-Dixon Line. Her unexpected death bestows her fortune to her dog Miss Ruffles, a Texas Cattle Cur with a Texas-sized attitude. Sunny, the housekeeper and the valet stand to inherit a million dollars each if they maintain Miss Honeybelle’s home and care for the dog for one year. Greedy relatives, university machinations, planned nuptials and garden club power plays abound. Under the watchful eye of Miss Honeybelle’s lawyer, Sunny must keep the incorrigible dog out of the rose garden while untangling the mystery of Miss Honeybelle’s demise.

 

Nancy Martin’s latest is no ordinary cozy. There are unexpected twists and turns as Sunny negotiates the culture of a small southern town — Texas style. Just when you think you have it all figured out, Martin throws you a curve you won’t see coming.

 

Nancy Martin is a winner of the Lifetime Achievement Award for mystery writing from RT Book Reviews and is the author of Foxy Roxy, Sticky Fingers and the bestselling Blackbird Sisters mysteries.

 


 
 

The Good Liar

posted by: February 12, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Good LiarDo you love a can’t-put-down thriller filled with lies, secrets and schemes galore? Yes? Then get your hands on a copy of Nicholas Searle’s The Good Liar.  Clever, engrossing and shocking is this tale of an octogenarian lifelong liar working on his last con. A page-turner that will haunt your thoughts long after you read the last word.

 

We meet Roy as he is preparing to embark on his last con. His mark is Betty, a sweet, trusting widow with a sizeable nest egg. They meet via online dating, arranged by Roy and the con is set in motion. Gain her trust. Move in with her. Have her “invest” with him in a phony high-yielding venture, leaving him with her investment. Easy, right? After all, Roy has been doing this his entire life. But what made Roy a good liar? Working backwards from adulthood to childhood, Searle brilliantly doles out details of Roy’s life, continually building suspense. You will devour each page, wanting to know Roy’s innermost secrets.  But you will also need to know if Roy gets his mark. And what happens to Betty? The twists will shock and awe you!

 

Fans of Patricia Highsmith’s The Talented Mr. Ripley and James M. Cain’s The Postman Always Rings Twice will enjoy Searle’s debut offering. The Good Liar also makes for an exceptional book club selection. Multidimensional characters, surprising twists and a good versus evil theme will definitely spark lively discussions. In fact, I was desperate to discuss this book with someone. So grab two copies of The Good Liar today, one for you and one for a friend, and get ready to be entertained and shocked! No lie!
 


 
 

The Big Rewind

posted by: February 11, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Big RewindIf you like your homicides with a side of vegan cupcakes and old school mix tapes, Libby Cudmore’s The Big Rewind is just the book for you. Set in a perfectly realized Brooklyn neighborhood populated by artists, musicians and other assorted hipsters, this debut novel offers an eclectic mix of mystery, love, social commentary and angst.

 

While attempting to deliver mail to her neighbor KitKat, Jett finds her dead on the kitchen floor, beaten to death with her own rolling pin. When KitKat’s innocent boyfriend Bronco is arrested for the crime, Jett vows to find the true killer. She believes the answer to the killer’s identity is contained within a mix tape that had been sent to KitKat anonymously — it sounds an awful lot like a breakup letter, from someone who was NOT Bronco. While immersing herself in KitKat’s love life, nostalgia takes hold and Jett begins reconnecting with ex-boyfriends who had loved her, deceived her and left her.

 

If Jett continues to follow the trail, will she find KitKat’s killer? And will she find her own romance worthy of mix tape exaltation?

 

Readers who enjoy this music-laden murder mystery may also like Simmone Howell’s Girl Defective. For a similar romantic plotline without the bloodshed, try Nick Hornby’s High Fidelity. If you’re interested in a real life romance that ends in tragedy, check out Rob Sheffield’s memoir Love Is a Mix Tape
 


 
 

Jessica Jones

posted by: February 1, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Jessica JonesLife would be rock star awesome if we had super powers, right? Well, not really. Take a look at Jessica Jones, a depressed private detective self-employed at Alias Investigations. Before that, though, she was a mediocre, costumed superhero with unimpressive super power abilities, at least when compared to big names like Storm and Invisible Woman. Follow me as I give you a sneak peek inside Jessica Jones: Alias, volume 1, a graphic novel penned by Brian Michael Bendis and illustrated by Michael Gaydos.
 

In Volume 1, Jessica works as a private detective at Alias Investigations to solve superhuman- related cases for her overly concerned clients. She takes on a job that turns out to be iffy. For instance, while she is out conducting surveillance for a case, she captures a man on video changing into his superhero costume. His name is Captain America, and his identity is a secret. The same case lands her in an interrogation room with the cops for suspicion of murder. Jessica realizes she was set up to film the secret identity of Captain America and to be the fall guy for a murder. Her plan is to find the mastermind behind this dirty scheme. Although Jessica Jones’ superhero days are possibly over, her future as private eye is looking mighty bright.

 
I totally admire the illustrations by Michael Gaydos. I love the panel layouts and the way he draws the characters’ facial expressions. The coloring by Matt Hollingsworth has a film noir-ish vibe, which is a plus because I love classic Hollywood films. The dialogue is engaging. The protagonist is mysterious and intriguing. I look forward to reading more about Jessica Jones. If you relish film noir, crime, mystery, private detectives and superheroes, read Jessica Jones: Alias, volume 1. If you find yourself liking this graphic novel, then check out Marvel's Jessica Jones television series, which is available now on Netflix. When you're finished reading Jessica Jones: Alias, volume 1, and you find yourself wanting more, be sure to pick up a copy of volumes 2, 3 and 4 at your nearest BCPL branch.

 


 
 

The Man on the Washing Machine

posted by: January 26, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Man on the Washing MachineLooking for a good mystery filled with offbeat characters and British wit? Then you must read The Man on the Washing Machine by Susan Cox. Winner of the 2014 Minotaur Books/Mystery Writers of America First Novel Competition, this story hooks you  from the very first page and continues to keep you guessing to the very end. Not dark or brooding in the least, this story is lighthearted and definitely fun to read.

 

Life in the quaint San Francisco neighborhood of Fabian Gardens, with its friendly neighbors and shared private garden, is just what Theo Bogart needs. So she thinks. Having fled her socialite life in England after a family tragedy, Theo lives under an assumed name as a partner in a toiletries shop. Just what the doctor ordered — life filled with the mundane tasks of running a business, while enjoying the company of her neighbors. Normal people with normal problems, including a jewelry designer with thinning hair, an overconfident surgeon, a depressed bakery owner and a garden designer obsessed with compost. But then local handyman Tim Callahan falls to his death from a third story window. Was he pushed? Why and by whom? Then, a man mysteriously appears on Theo’s washing machine. Who is he? Why did he not attack her? Odd behavior for an intruder, to say the least. As Theo becomes obsessed with finding this mysterious man, yet another murder occurs. Meanwhile, her business partner disappears and strange crates belonging to her business emerge. What is going on in Fabian Gardens? How involved are Theo’s friends? Who can she trust? Perhaps she is not the only one with a secret.

 

Fans of Agatha Christie novels and British comedies will enjoy Cox’s debut offering. She fills her pages with characters who keep you guessing and wit galore. Figuring out the mystery is only half the fun of this read. Learning about the residents of Fabian Gardens is definitely the other half.

 


 
 

The Grownup

posted by: January 15, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for The GrownupDo you have time in your busy schedule to read a short story? Not just any short story, but a ghost story. Not just any ghost story, but a ghost story by Gillian Flynn. You may have heard of her. She is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of Sharp Objects, Dark Places and Gone Girl, one of most talked about novels of 2014 .  Flynn’s latest release is a stand-alone copy of her 64-page, Edgar Awarding-winning short story, The Grownup. It made its first appearance in author George R. R. Martin's Rogues anthology.

 

The Grownup is about an unnamed and “barely thirty” female con artist who works at a sketchy place called Spiritual Palms that provides fortunes and illegal sex services. Viveca, her boss gives her a job promotion, which makes the con artist no longer a sex worker but a fraudulent fortune-teller. A troubled customer by the name of Susan Burke stops in to have her fortune told. The con artist learns that Susan is being terrorized by her 15-year-old stepson,Miles, and that a trickle of blood drips on the wall inside Susan’s renovated Victorian house. The con artist helps Susan by cleansing the inside of her home. During one of her house cleansing visits, the con artist meets Miles, a menacing teen who gives her an ultimatum: stay away or die. However, the con artist ignores his threat and soon finds out that she is the one being swindled. Swindled by who? You’ll just have to read it and find out.

 

If you are a Gillian Flynn fan or you just want to read an entertaining short story, I encourage you to check out a copy of The Grownup at a BCPL branch near you. And whatever you do, avoid a place called Spiritual Palms.


 
 

The Red Storm

posted by: January 4, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover of the Red StormIn the debut novel The Red Storm by Grant Bywaters, life isn’t easy for William Fletcher, former-boxer-turned-private-detective living in segregated 1930s New Orleans; not many white people are willing to respect, let alone hire, an African American private eye. When his former employer and mob associate, the violent Bill Storm, reappears in Fletcher’s life with a final request – to locate Storm’s daughter – Fletcher figures things couldn’t get worse.
 

But then, Storm is found shot in the head, and his killer seems to be gunning for his daughter. She hires Fletcher as protection, setting off a chain reaction of escalating violence between the police and different mob factions. Fletcher has to use all of his boxing experience and investigative instincts to survive the coming storm.
 

The Red Storm is a treat for any hardboiled detective or historical fiction fan and especially so for fans of boxing as the book is rife with references. Bywaters is frank in his depictions of violence, be it a boxing match or a fight between mobsters. He also never lets the reader forget the time period he’s writing in either; not only does he reference specific events and places in New Orleans history but he also doesn’t shy from the slang or the racial issues. Counterpoint to the rampant casual racism and segregation is Fletcher himself, who won’t let anything impede his investigations. 
 

It’s easy to understand why Bywaters won the Best First Private Eye Novel Competition sponsored by the Private Eye Writers of America (PWA) and Minotaur Books, with his professional experience as a licensed private investigator adding authenticity to Fletcher’s fictional investigations. Reminiscent of Walter Mosley and James M. Cain, mystery fans will appreciate this new voice in hardboiled detective fiction.
 


 
 

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