Welcome to the Baltimore County Public Library.

Baltimore County Public Library logo Sign up now. Read from June 16 to August 10. Fizz, Boom, READ! Summer Reading Club.
   
Type of search:   
BCPL on FacebookBCPL on YouTubeBCPL on TwitterBCPL on FlickrBCPL on Tumblr

Between the Covers / Shhhh... we're reading.   Photo of reading after bedtime
Adult | Author Interviews

 

RSS this blog

Tags

Adult

+ Fiction

   Fantasy

   Graphic Novel

   Historical

   Horror

   Humor

   Legal

   Literary

   Magical Realism

   Media Tie-In

   Mystery

   Mythology

   Paranormal

   Romance

   Science Fiction

   Thriller

+ Nonfiction

   Author Interviews

   Awards

   In the News

Teen

+ Fiction

   Adventure

   Dystopian

   Fantasy

   Graphic Novel

   Historical

   Humor

   Media Tie-In

   Mystery

   Paranormal

   Realistic

   Romance

   Science Fiction

   Steampunk

   Nonfiction

   Author Interviews

   Awards

   In the News

Children

+ Fiction

   Adventure

   Beginning Reader

   Concepts

   Fantasy

   First Chapter Book

   Graphic Novel

   Historical

   Humor

   Media Tie-In

   Mystery

   Picture Book

   Realistic

   Tales

+ Nonfiction

   Author Interviews

   Awards

   In the News

Bloggers

 

Between the Covers with M.D. Waters

Cover art for PrototypeEarlier this year, Between the Covers blogger Jeanne told our readers about Archetype, a debut novel by Maryland author M.D. Waters. In that novel, Emma wakes with no memory of her past. She begins to have flashes of memory and soon realizes that neither her doctor nor her loving husband Declan are exactly who they seem to be. She fights to learn the truth, and what she finds is truly shocking.

 

Prototype is the exciting conclusion to Emma’s story. The novel picks up one year after the end of Archetype. Emma now knows what happened to her, and she finds herself on the run from Declan. If she wants to survive, she must trust Noah, the man who she used to believe was the love of her life, and members of a resistance group that she used to help lead. The action ramps up in Prototype as Emma claims her true identity. This book is a genre-bending hybrid of science fiction, romance, action and psychological suspense.

 

Waters recently answered some questions for Between the Covers readers. Learn more about this talented writer, what she’s working on now and the music that influenced Emma’s story.

 

Between the Covers: What inspired you to write Emma’s story?
M.D. Waters: Growing up, my dad was a huge influence on me when it came to what the future could hold. I always had these things in the back of my mind: a planet-wide overpopulation, technology to control what type of child you bring into the world and that Mother Nature will always make it right. So when Emma woke me in the middle of the night, telling me she lived in a world where women were a rare commodity… Well, I immediately thought of all these things my dad believed possible.

 

BTC: Equality and legal rights, which differ wildly between men and women as well as clones and humans, are an important issue in both books. Have you had much feedback from readers about those issues?
MW: I have, yes, and everyone takes away very different things. Lots of positive thought provoking, but also some negatives, which surprises me. Lots of assumptions on my “plan,” which doesn’t exist. I see those issues as very normal and very possible, and didn’t even think about the actual rights issues it addressed when I wrote the books. We already live in a world where equality is a matter of perspective, and many of us are blind to the truth. Will it always be that way? I don’t know. I’d love to think we’re progressing to complete equality, but we’re human and subject to nature and/or nurture.

 

BTC: You share a lot of music on your blog. If Emma had a theme song, what would it be?
MW: “Lost in Paradise” by Evanescence. I swear there was a point when I listened to it on repeat for days. But I’d also choose “Tear the World Down” by We Are the Fallen. I felt a lot of Emma’s strength in Prototype in that one.

 

BTC: The books are a great blend of action, science fiction, romance and suspense. Let’s pretend that you just got the call that Archetype and Prototype are being made into a movie, and you have free rein with the casting. Tell us about your dream cast.
MW: Jennifer Lawrence, Stephen Amell (Declan) and Charlie Hunnam (Noah). (Triple crosses fingers!)

 

BTC: Will you tell us a little bit about your writing process? Where do you write? Do you write every day? Who is your first reader?
MW: My process is crazy. I go in these really long spurts of sleeplessness and coffee hazes. Then I binge watch television for days after because I broke my brain. I have a “library” in my house with my books and desktop, but I move around to different areas with my laptop too. Change of scenery always helps. My first readers? Charissa Weaks and Jodi Henry. I have a handful of people who read for me, but these two are always there to read short paragraphs to entire chapters on a whim. I couldn’t do this without them.

 

BTC: What can readers expect from you next?
MW: More of the same. I’m working on a spinoff of Archetype and Prototype, but also a Young Adult sci-fi [novel] that’s set in a world with its own set of issues.

 

BTC: As a reader, what book are you most excited to get your hands on right now?
MW: How much time do we have? Currently, I’m ready to get my hands on The Infinite Sea by Rick Yancey. His writing really shook loose the voice in the Young Adult [novel] I’m working on, plus The 5th Wave was seriously kick-ass. So, um, gimme.

Beth

 
 

Between the Covers with Elaine Eff

Cover art for The Painted Screens of BaltimoreMaryland folklorist Elaine Eff is a champion of local culture and traditions. In her new book, she sets her sights on a much-loved Baltimore icon: the painted window screen and the artists who created them. Eff will discuss her latest work, The Painted Screens of Baltimore: an Urban Folk Art Revealed, on Tuesday, July 1 at 7:00 p.m. at the North Point Branch. The program, which is part of the branch’s “Dundalk Dialogs” local author speaker series, will include a book talk and signing. Eff recently answered questions for Between the Covers about her new book.

 

Between the Covers: How did you become interested in the history of Baltimore’s painted screens?
Elaine Eff: Serendipity. Two coincidences that changed the course of my life: As a Baltimore girl, I was expected to be an authority on our local folk art – which I was not. In fact, I knew nothing on the subject. When I arrived at graduate school, I found a 19thcentury – not Baltimore, but New York State – painted screen in our museum’s collection, and that started my journey. I needed to learn what history, if any, the two might share.

 

BTC: Can you share how you conducted your research for this project?
EF: Face-to-face, person-by-person. Visiting artists, walking the streets of East Baltimore, talking to strangers, traveling to libraries, museums and archives nationwide, international research and casting the net wider and deeper as the subject became richer and more fascinating.

 

BTC: What do you want readers, who may not have any knowledge of this Baltimore tradition, to take away from your book?
EF: Painted screens are a response to a community’s need for privacy. Row houses demand them, and they had the extra bonus of being downright beautiful. “You see out. No one sees in,” and “They used to be everywhere” is what you hear all the time. The book is as much about Baltimore and neighborhood building. It has something for everyone and can be appreciated on many levels: as a whole, in small bites or tastes here and there. Appreciate what an incredible city of resourceful people can make happen.

 

BTC: Among the painters you researched were there any who were as colorful as the art they created?
EF: Every single one. That is why I first made the film The Screen Painters.  Every painter is a movie in him or herself. They needed to tell their own story and did. They are an incredible group of creative individuals who changed the face of a city. Not bad for a bunch of local untrained artists! The book gives you a glimpse into that wonderful era when the sidewalks told a very different – an incredibly colorful —story, in many ways.

 

BTC: What were some of the favorite images seen around town?
EF: The Red Bungalow was it. Everyone wanted to have the red cottage with a winding path, a pond and swans. Ninety percent of the windows had that scene as interpreted by hundreds of different hands. Today things are very different — strangely, now we see a lot of local landmarks, like the [Patterson Park] Pagoda. One house in Highlandtown even has Formstone painted on the window screen! Big difference is it used to be EVERY window and door — front and back. Now we see the front window and little more. Times and tastes have changed. And that is wonderful.

 

Readers who would like to learn more can also visit The Painted Screen Society of Baltimore website.
 

Cynthia

 
 

Between the Covers with Elin Hilderbrand

Cover art for The MatchmakerWarm days, long nights, the beach and a new novel from Elin Hilderbrand equal summer perfection! This year, the Nantucket resident and bestselling novelist with over four million copies of her books in print returns to her beloved island to bring us The Matchmaker. Dabney has always had a magical gift for matchmaking, which her husband and daughter view as merely meddlesome. But with over 40 happy couples to her credit, none of whom have consciously uncoupled, it’s hard to question her instincts. However, the one person she may have failed is herself. So when Clendenin Hughes returns to the island, she comes face to face with the man who stole her heart so long ago. Readers will relish the romance at the heart of The Matchmaker, an engaging story about losing and finding love.
 

Get to know Elin as she answers questions about her newest blockbuster, the food and books she brings to the beach and reminisces about her time in Baltimore.
 

Between the Covers: Dabney Kimball is the matchmaker in your latest book who has an almost mythical gift for creating perfect pairs. Have you ever successfully matched a couple? Would you ever attempt to interfere in your childrens’ or other family members’ love lives like Dabney does?

Elin Hilderbrand: I have never matched anyone myself, no. I basically take a non-interventionist policy across the board, and always have. I do believe that in matters of love, luck reigns. Some marriages work for no apparent reason and some fail for no apparent reason. Love, in my opinion, is a crapshoot.

 

BTC: Dabney is a woman with secrets at a crossroads. While her matchmaking ability is unique, she is still such a relatable character in the same vein as your previous heroines. How do you create such distinctive, strong female characters? Are they modeled after real people?

EH: Dabney came to me in pieces, and as with my other characters, I started with her flaws. She has a strange phobia about leaving the island...which caused her to lose the only man she ever truly loved...which left her in her current predicament of being married to one man and in love with another. I love all of Dabney's idiosyncrasies, her way of dressing, her habits, her rituals — but none of this matters without her darling, pure, sweet heart. Dabney is older than me, but I love her like she's my child.

 

BTC: You bring Nantucket to life so vividly in The Matchmaker and in almost all of your other novels. What is it about the island that captured your heart?Image of Elin Hilderbrand

EH: When my ferry first pulled into Nantucket harbor, I knew I was a goner. I like to paraphrase John Denver and say it was like coming home to a place I'd never been before. The historically preserved downtown and the 50 miles of pristine beach combine in a way that makes me ache. I love authenticity — and there is no other place in the world that is like Nantucket Island.

 

BTC: Before settling in Nantucket, you spent time here in Baltimore where you graduated from Johns Hopkins University. Did you enjoy your time in Charm City? What do you miss most?

EH: I have wonderful memories of Baltimore, most of them Hopkins-centered. My roommates and I used to hang out at PJ's Pub across the street from the library. Fifty cent pizza slices on Sundays! I adored the Baltimore Museum of Art, which was on campus, and Fells Point, especially Bertha's Mussels. One of my favorite memories was moving our couch out onto our front yard during Opening Day, back when the Orioles played at Memorial Stadium on 33rd Street — our house was at 33rd and Calvert so everyone walked by us, including Richard Gephart. I think what I miss most is the lacrosse. As a 1991 graduate of Hopkins, I saw the best lacrosse anyone can hope to see — it was the era of Dave Pietramala and Quint Kessinich verses the Gait brothers — Paul and Gary — from Syracuse.

 

BTC: You’re a long-suffering Philadelphia Eagles fan. Do you think this is going to be their Super Bowl year? Do you have a favorite baseball team? How do your family and friends feel about your non-New England football fandom?
EH: I am a die-hard Philadelphia Eagles fan from childhood, but I don't think they will ever win a Super Bowl. In the tradition of Philly fandom, I have been disappointed too many times to hold out any hope. In baseball, I root for the Red Sox — that is a tremendous ball club, and Fenway Park is phenomenal. My kids root for the Sox and the Pats, although they also cheer on the Eagles, but probably only because they feel sorry for me.

 

BTC: Share some of your process. Do you write every day? Where? Who do you use as a sounding board?
EH: I write every day that I'm able — which, as my career soars, gets harder and harder. I also have three children who need to be driven around the island to their various sporting events. But I normally take three to four days a week to dedicate to my composing, and in this way, I have managed to finish a book a year. The only people who read my work are my two agents and my editor, Reagan Arthur. Reagan and I have a relationship based in extreme respect. She tells me what to do to fix a book, and I do it.

Cover art for Winter Street

 

BTC: You’ve said you write at the beach in the summer, do you also take time to read while surf-side? What books will be in your beach bag this summer? More importantly, what are the must-haves in your picnic basket?
EH: I am constantly reading. For me, reading is working, because immersing myself in other stories inspires me. Right now, I'm reading Shotgun Lovesongs by Nickolas Butler, which I love. Also on my list are Thirty Girls by Susan Minot and The Ice Cream Queen of Orchard Street by Susan Jane Gilman.
 

Now, in my picnic basket: my own grilled zucchini dip and chips, lobster salad, corn salad, watermelon and Bing cherries. I'm also a big fan of chilled soups. I make a yellow tomato gazpacho that has fresh orange juice and a little bit of cream in it. It's a drug.

 

BTC: Readers will be delighted to learn that the wait for your next novel is short, as this fall you share the snowy side of Nantucket with Winter Street. Can you give readers a sneak peek of what to expect from this holiday story?
EH: I've never read a Christmas novel myself, but I can say the most fun I've ever had writing a novel was the two and a half months I spent writing Winter Street. It's about a family named the Quinns who run a bed and breakfast on Nantucket, and two days before Christmas, their lives sort of communally fall apart. In addition to family drama, there are nutcrackers, Byers Choice carolers, homemade ornaments, carols banged out on the piano, shots of whiskey, private jets, engagement rings, plum pudding, fires in the hearth, Santa Claus suits and champagne and caviar. If you're an Elin Hilderbrand fan, Winter Street comes highly recommended.

Maureen

 
 

Between the Covers with Deborah Rudacille

Cover art for Roots of SteelDeborah RudacilleFor local writer Deborah Rudacille, writing her latest book was a personal odyssey. The daughter of a Bethlehem steelworker knows the heart and soul of the Dundalk community she called home for many years. It's fitting that Rudacille will kick off  the North Point Branch’s “Dundalk Dialogs,” the new adult speaker series that takes place this summer. Rudacille will discuss her latest book, Roots of Steel: Boom and Bust in an American Mill Town that chronicles the rise and fall of the Sparrows Point steel mill and the neighborhoods in its wake. The program, which includes a book talk and signing, will be held Tuesday, June 3 at 7 p.m. Rudacille recently answered questions for Between the Covers about the genesis for her story and her personal connection to Dundalk.

 

Between the Covers: Your book, Roots of Steel: Boom and Bust in an American Mill Town, conveys a powerful message about what happens when the American dream fails right in our own backyards. What drove you to tell this story of the former Bethlehem Steel plant and the local community it shaped?
 

Deborah Rudacille: I grew up in Eastfield, and my family, like many of our neighbors, owed their homes and their livelihoods to Bethlehem Steel. When my parents bought their house on Harold Road my dad worked in the tandem mill at Sparrows Point and my mother worked as a secretary for United Steelworkers Local 2610. Most of the men in my family worked at Sparrows Point. So the rise and fall of the American steel industry wasn’t just theory for me — it’s the story of my own family and community.

 

BTC: You present an objective look at an industry in decline. Did the fact that the story was so close to home make it difficult to write at times?
 

DR: Yes. The reporting was easy and fun because I got to hang out with people who were much like the folks I had known growing up and to listen to their stories. But the writing was more challenging because I had to figure out a way to weave together their stories with those of workers who had very different experiences in a way that didn’t skirt the less savory aspects of the narrative — the systemic racism at the Point, for one — and situate them in the broader history of the American steel industry.

 

BTC: You use personal narrative along with workers’ interviews. Can you talk a little bit about how you conducted your research for this project? Were people open to talking about their experiences?
 

DR: Absolutely! Sparrows Point was more than just a job for most of these folks so they loved reminiscing about their experiences there. I started with family members and then worked outward, attending monthly retiree meetings at the union hall and luncheons at various senior centers and churches around town. I like to say that you can’t throw a stone in Baltimore without hitting someone with a Sparrows Point connection, which made it very easy to find folks to tell their stories — not just workers themselves but also family members, and of course people who had been raised in the company town. I also did quite a bit of archival research at the Dundalk-Patapsco Neck Historical Society, Baltimore County Historical Library, Museum of Industry and other archives.

 

BTC: There are so many threads running through your book — the danger of the mill work itself, the labor unions, racial tensions, safety and environmental issues, the “company town”  concept  to name a few. How did you go about framing your narrative?
 

DR: Well, as I said, that was the greatest challenge in writing the book. There were all these disparate threads and themes, and I knew that I had to include all of them to provide an honest and objective look at life on the Point. Ultimately, I decided to tell the story chronologically but focus each chapter on a different issue using the voices of my sources to carry the narrative forward. Once I settled on that structure, the writing of the book became much easier.

 

BTC: Roots of Steel, published in 2010, was your third book. Your previous books were science-focused. Can you tell us what is next for you as a writer? What else are you doing professionally?
 

DR: I’ve been working as professor of the practice at UMBC for the past couple of years, teaching journalism and science writing. I’ve also done some preliminary reporting for my next project, a kind of Catholic “Roots of Steel” which tells the story of the post-Vatican II church from the perspective of lay Catholics. I’ll be talking with people who have left the church as well as people who remain about their feelings on the sex abuse scandal, the status and role of women in the church and the struggle of LGBT Catholics and divorced and remarried Catholics to remain part of an institution that (officially at least) does not consider them worthy to receive the sacraments. As with Roots of Steel, it will tell a big story through the lens of individual experience.

Cynthia

 
 

Between the Covers with Steve Berry

Cover art for The Lincoln MythSteve Berry, bestselling and highly acclaimed author of historical thrillers, including the Cotton Malone series, has over 17,000,000 copies of his books in print internationally. Get to know Steve as he answers questions about his latest bestseller and future writing plans, and even shares the strangest way he’s encountered his readers!

 

The Lincoln Myth involves Abraham Lincoln, the U.S. Constitution, religious zealots and of course, Cotton Malone trying to save the country. Where do you get your ideas? Is it true that there is a little bit of you in Cotton?

 

The constitutional concept of secession has always fascinated me.  It's one of those arguments that have no easy answer.  The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is likewise interesting.  It is the quintessential American religion, and it played some key roles in our history.  When I found out that Abraham Lincoln was the first president to ever read the Book of Mormon, and that he made a secret deal with Brigham Young, I knew there was a novel there.  So I sent Cotton Malone to get to the bottom of things.  And he is basically me.  When I created him for The Templar Legacy, I used my personality, so we share a lot of traits, like the love of rare books.  He doesn’t like enclosed spaces, I don’t either.  He doesn’t like the taste of alcohol.  He has finicky eating habits.  That's me.  I, of course, don’t jump out of planes and shoot guns at bad guys, but I live that through him.  

 

You’ve said in the past that the most wonderful fiction always has a ring of truth to it. What’s the ring of truth in The Lincoln Myth?

 

The concept of a union of 50 states that is indivisible and forever is not necessarily accurate.  Lincoln did not fight the Civil War to save the Union, he fought that war to create the Union.  I doubt many of us realize that.  I didn't, until I did the research for this novel.

 

History is so important to you that you and your wife created History Matters to assist communities around the world with historic restoration and preservation.  In fact, you’ll be in Baltimore at the B & O Museum for a reception and book signing on May 21 for the Edgar Allan Poe House. Why does history matter?

 

History is who we are and where we came from.  To forget that or, even worse, to just allow it to rot away, robs the future of that past.  It's our duty to preserve what came before for the next generation.

 

With so many copies of your books all over the world, you must encounter people reading your novels all the time. What is the weirdest place you’ve ever seen a Steve Berry book being read? How about the most exotic?

 

Fiji is probably the most exotic.  The oddest happened in an airport.  The man sitting beside me started reading the latest hardback, then a woman sitting across from me did the same thing.  On the back cover of each book was a full color photo of me, yet neither made the connection.  That's the cool thing about being a writer.  You don't lose your anonymity, which is wonderful.

 

Your favorite holiday decoration is your Star Trek themed tree complete with Santa in a transporter. Have you ever considered writing science fiction or fantasy?

 

I'd love to write a sci-fi novel one day.  I even have one churning in my mind, and I just might do it.  I've always been a fan of that genre.

 

How big of a thrill was it to be asked to write the forewords for the upcoming re-releases of James Michener’s novels?

 

That was truly an honor.  He is, hands-down, my favorite writer of all time.  I have a complete collection of his novels that I've amassed for over 40 years.  To see my name on the same cover with his will be amazing.  I hope a new generation of readers will rediscover Michener.   He was genius.  I write today because of him.

 

Do you have any sneak peeks for our readers as to what’s in store for Cotton Malone’s 15th adventure? Can you share any news in the development of the series for the small screen?

 

Cotton will return in 2015.  This one deals with another fascinating quirk from the Constitution.   It's called The Patriot Threat, and it will be on sale in March.  Alcon Entertainment is still developing a possible television series for Cotton.  Hopefully, it'll make it to the screen one day.  If anyone would like to know more about that, or me, or the books, check out www.steveberry.org.

Maureen

 
 

Between the Covers with Rob Kasper

Rob KasperBaltimore Beer: A Satisfying History of Charm City BrewingBaltimore author Rob Kasper will discuss his book Baltimore Beer: A Satisfying History of Charm City Brewing, at 7:00 p.m. on Tuesday, May 6, at the Perry Hall Branch. This program is sponsored by the Friends of the Perry Hall Library. Kasper, who also had a prolific career as a writer and reporter for The Baltimore Sun, recently answered questions for Between the Covers about his book.

 

How long had the idea for Baltimore Beer been, well, brewing, before you put pen to paper? At what point did you decide to make a serious study of Baltimore beer and the history of local breweries?

 

About 10 years. One day at The Sun I got a call saying National Premium was no longer being bottled (it has since been revived). Reading the clips to write the story, I realized there was no current history of Baltimore breweries. Originally I had a contract with the publishing arm of Bibelot bookstores to write the book. They went bankrupt and the project lay dormant, then I got a contract with History Press and finished the book.

 

What was the most interesting or the oddest piece of information about Baltimore beer or breweries that you discovered in your research?

 

Three things come to mind that show how breweries were a major part of Baltimore’s social fabric. One, how German the city of Baltimore was. In addition to all the breweries, city council notes were printed in German and English until World War I. Two, how the Lone Ranger’s silver bullet and some National Premium executives coaxed the owner of the Washington Senators into letting the Orioles move to Baltimore in 1954. Three, when a fisherman caught Diamond Jim III (a rockfish tagged by American Brewing Company) and won $25,000, the fisherman argued that catching the fish was civic achievement and therefore tax free. A judge was amused but said the fisherman owed $6,000 in taxes.

 

For more than three decades, you were a reporter, columnist and editorial writer for The Baltimore Sun. What are a few notable moments or highs from your career with the newspaper?

 

I won a handful of national writing awards for my columns which buoyed me, but the most gratifying part of the job was the feedback from readers – phone calls, letters and comments from folks I bumped into who had read something I had written. Mostly they liked what I had written, but sometimes not.

 

You’ve made a career in Baltimore, but you grew up in Kansas. How did you find your way to the East Coast?

 

All the great seafood lovers grew up in the Midwest. That is because when folks out here were eating rockfish on Fridays, we were chewing on fish sticks. When I came to Maryland to work at The Sun, (after a five-year stop at the Louisville Courier-Journal and Times and a one-day – yes, one-day – stint at the National Observer) I tasted crab soup, crab cakes, steamed crabs and soft crabs. There was no going back. I once beat Brooks Robinson in a celebrity crab picking contest – not bad for a guy from Dodge City. But I later got demolished by Shirley Phillips, of Phillips Seafood. She used a knife to slice up the steamed crabs. The way she wielded that knife, you wouldn’t want to cross her.

 

Okay, we need to ask: Your favorite beer?

 

Well, like Ado Annie in Oklahoma!, the girl who cain’t say no, my favorite depends on whom I am with. At Brewer’s Art it is Resurrection; at Union Craft it is Duckpin; at Heavy Seas it is Loose Cannon; at Pratt Street Ale House it is Extra Special Bitter; at DuClaw it is Black Jack Stout; at Flying Dog it is Snake Dog. The beer I still pine for is pilsner from the long-gone Baltimore Brewing Company. That was exceptional. I make do substituting with Victory Prima Pils and the Pendulum Pilsner from RavenBeer.

 

Tell us a little about Baltimore Beer Week, a nonprofit that celebrates local brewing, which you helped to found.

 

My contributions to Beer Week pale compared with those of Joe Gold and Dominic Cantalupo and the late Mick Kipp. But basically it is a 10-day celebration in October of all things beery in Baltimore. There are tastings, beer dinners and tours of breweries, including the classic old American Brewery, now home to the nonprofit Humanin. I try to provide historical background and remind beer drinkers that the good stuff they are enjoying today was built on the shoulders of generations of brewers before them.

Melanie

 
 

Between the Covers with Donna Jackson Nakazawa

Donna Jackson NakazawaThe Last Best Cure by Donna Jackson NakazawaThe Autoimmune Epidemic by Donna Jackson NakazawaBaltimore author Donna Jackson Nakazawa discusses her latest book, The Last Best Cure, on Wednesday, April 16 at 7 p.m. at the Perry Hall Branch, sponsored by the Friends of the Perry Hall Library. The award-winning science journalist and writer recently answered questions for Between the Covers about her book.

 

Before The Last Best Cure, you authored another book about autoimmune diseases, The Autoimmune Epidemic. What insights or new knowledge did you gain between that book and The Last Best Cure? What was going on in your life prior to writing these books?

 

The Autoimmune Epidemic focused on how modern chemicals in the world around us and in our diet are overwhelming the human immune system, contributing to rising disease rates and chronic illnesses. The Last Best Cure takes this research a step further and investigates “psychoneuroimmunology,” a new field of study that investigates how mind states, such as anxiety, fear, worry, rumination, anger and pain, can end up damaging our immune function in much the same way as environmental chemicals. Prior to this, I was struggling with my own health crises. The Last Best Cure is my chronicle of a one-year doctor/patient experiment to see if altering my mood state might shift my inflammatory markers and perhaps even improve my physical well-being.

 

The Last Best Cure has received much critical praise, described as a book that will offer hope for recovery, and change and save lives. What is the most important insight or piece of information you want readers to take away from your book?

 

I want people to know that there already exists an understanding as to how we can activate the healing potential of the brain. Understanding how to do this gives us powerful tools, ways to change the messages our brain is sending to our cells and our body. Everyone deserves to live the life they want, and these tools can help us all achieve a greater sense of well-being, and even joy.   

 

You were already an award-winning science journalist and writer when you began writing these last two books. What was it like writing professionally about a topic that was also very personal to you? Were there any “aha” moments for your own life as you were writing?

 

At first, I was only going to write about my personal experiences in the introduction to The Last Best Cure, but my editor thought readers would want to read more about how I also went on this transformational journey myself. She thought it would help convey to readers that we can all take this journey, no matter what physical or emotional health challenges we face. There was so much that I realized along the way about adversity, self-respect and how they play a role in adult illness. Now I’m profoundly grateful to have taken this journey: Life is sweeter, relationships are better and it’s a better, more meaningful way to live.

 

In addition to being about healing and recovering personal joy, The Last Best Cure is a story about a health epidemic. What steps do we need to take now to secure a better health outlook for future generations?

 

We need to absolutely, completely and radically change how we view the doctor/patient relationship. If we keep up the current “medical factory” model we’re going to see very little progress in managing chronic health issues. Right now, 133 million adults in America have chronic illnesses, not counting the 22 million with addiction – and these numbers are rapidly climbing. The tools to help patients participate in their own healing and facilitate greater well-being exist; it just requires that physicians incorporate new practices into their doctor/patient paradigm. In order to do this, we must change the way we as a society view treatment, health care and the doctor/patient relationship.

 

Are there any new books in the works?

 

Yes, one due out at the end of next year called Childhood Interrupted: How Adversity in the Past Writes the Story of Our Future – And How We Can Change the Script (Atria/Simon & Schuster). It’s a deeper, more extended study of how childhood adversity can create changes in the brain and in our immunology that impact our health long into adulthood – and what we can do to reverse those effects as adults. I’m telling cutting-edge stories of science, about how even very common forms of childhood adversity can reset our immune system to be more stress-reactive, sparking a state of chronic low-grade neuroinflammation for life. I want to help readers understand how the stress we meet in childhood can determine our lifelong "set point" for emotional reactivity, inflammation, disease and depression – and what we can do to reverse the impact of early adversity and trauma years later, in adulthood, to regain our physical and emotional well-being.

 

How long has the Baltimore area been home to you? What do you like best about living in this area?

 

My family moved to Baltimore four years ago from Annapolis; my mom and my husband’s parents were already living here, so it just made sense. What I like best about Baltimore is its people. Baltimoreans are real, genuine, honest, intellectual, creative, smart and energetic. They’re committed to their community and engaged in making this a better place to live. We love it here. It’s a vibrant place to be.

 

To learn more about The Last Best Cure, please visit the author’s website or link with her on Facebook.

Melanie

 
 

Between the Covers with Hank Phillippi Ryan

The Wrong GirlHank Phillippi RyanIn addition to her busy career as a reporter for NBC’s Boston affiliate, Hank Phillippi Ryan has made a name for herself as a bestselling author of suspense fiction. In Ryan’s most recent novel, The Wrong Girl, reporter Jane Ryland is contacted by a former co-worker who asks for Jane’s help because she believes that she was reunited with the wrong birth mother. At the same time, Detective Jake Brogan is investigating the brutal murder of a woman who was found in her house with two young children and an empty crib. He believes that it’s more than the simple domestic violence case that it seems to be. Soon, it becomes obvious that the cases are linked. Ryan’s writing is pitch-perfect as she builds suspense and continues to develop Jane and Jake’s will-they-or-won’t-they relationship.

 

Ryan generously agreed to answer a few questions for Between the Covers readers. She tells us about her lifelong love of mysteries, her inspiration and why she writes page-turners but not “stomach-turners.”

 

When you wrote your first novel, you already had a very successful career as a television reporter. What made you take that leap? Did you always want to write fiction?

 

I grew up in very rural Indiana ... so rural you could not see another house from our house. My sister and I used to ride our ponies to the library – we’d get books and put them in the saddle bags and then read them up in the hayloft of our barn. (Yes, I know I look like a city girl now! But that’s how it all started.)  

 

I fell in love with Nancy Drew, then, soon after, Sherlock Holmes. Then soon after that, all the wonderful Golden Age mystery authors – Ngaio Marsh and Josephine Tey and Dorothy Sayers ... and of course Agatha Christie. And I think that’s where my love of mystery storytelling was born.

 

But I went on to be a journalist – starting in radio in 1971! Then in TV in 1975.  (So far, I’ve won 30 Emmys for investigative reporting, and I am still on the air at Boston’s NBC affiliate.) And when you think of it, journalism is also storytelling, right? It’s just stories that are true. I never gave up my love of mystery and thriller reading, but – okay, I’ll admit it. I just never had a good idea for my own fiction.

 

Then in – 2005, maybe, I had a great idea. I knew it instantly, and from that moment on I was obsessed with writing what turned out to be the Agatha Award-winning first novel, Prime Time. (It’s a great story – maybe invite me to visit the library, and I’ll tell you the whole thing.)

 

After that, I was completely hooked. Now I have the joy of juggling two fabulous careers – stressful, and high-stakes and unpredictable, yes – but I am very lucky.

 

How does your work as a reporter influence your writing?

 

Well, it’s all about telling a story, right? Whether you’re making it up or not. I am well aware as a TV reporter that if a viewer isn’t interested, entertained, informed and riveted, they can simply zap me away with the click of a remote. So I have learned over all these years to tell a good story. 

 

Happily, I get to use the same skills in crime fiction. I know if you don’t love the characters and the plot, if you’re not riveted to turning the pages, you’re going to close the cover and find another book. I do my best not to let that happen! And that’s all about the story.

 

I’ve also wired myself with hidden cameras, confronted corrupt politicians, gone undercover and in disguise, been tear-gassed and at hostage situations, at fires and crime scenes, had people confess to murder, seen how people behave when they’re lying or terrified. So there’s an authenticity from my day job that I bring to my crime fiction. The things that happen to Jane could happen to me! And some of them certainly have!

 

So having this career which brings me into places the public can’t always go and into situations that can be exciting and high-stakes gives me a never-ending (I hope) source of inspiration. I don’t take my TV stories and fictionalize them, but I do use the real-life experience to make it genuine.

 

While crime plays a major part in your novels, the violence takes place “off the page.” Was that a conscious decision or just something that evolved as part of your writing style?

 

Oh, interesting. When I read a particularly ghoulish and violent book – confession here – I sometimes skip the graphic parts. (Yes, I know, it’s funny, since my real life shows me a very dark part of the world.) Did I decide – oh, I’m not going to go graphic? No. But they always say to write the kind of book you love to read – and for me that’s Lisa Scottoline, Linda Fairstein, Sue Grafton, Laura Lippman, Meg Gardiner, John Lescroart,  Harlan Coben, Steve Hamilton. Very, very suspenseful, yes, very high stakes, yes. But gory/bloody/violent? No. So I write my books to be page-turners – as Library Journal called The Wrong Girl “stellar” and a “superb thriller” – but they are not, um, stomach-turners!  

   

Can you tell us a little bit about what inspired you to write The Wrong Girl?

 

It’s a great story. I got a call at my TV station – and this is the perfect example of what you were asking – from a woman who said, “Hank! You’ve got to do a story about my cousin. She was given up at birth to an adoption agency 25 years ago and got a call from them asking if she wanted to be reunited with her birth mother. She said yes – but you know, when they met? Turned out they weren’t related! The agency had sent that woman the wrong girl!”

 

I’m laughing now, even as I type this. I remember thinking, “Thank you, universe! The Wrong Girl! There’s my book!” A book about mothers and daughters, the struggle of adoption from all sides, the need for a family. What if someone made up a family history for you – would you believe it? What if you didn’t know the truth about your own family? How would you recognize your own daughter? Fascinating and relevant questions. And I was off and writing!

 

What’s turned out to be just as timely and fascinating – there’s a huge problem, making headlines right now, about the chaos in the Massachusetts foster-care system. A completely fictional version of that is key to The Wrong Girl. Amazing, huh? That book as written way before those headlines.

 

And did you see it’s now nominated for the Agatha Award for Best Novel?

 

What are you working on next? Will we get to see more of Jake and Jane?

 

Yes, absolutely! (And thank you.) Truth Be Told will be out on September 30.  It’s about a mortgage banker who decides to keep her economically challenged customers out of foreclosure by manipulating their records so it looks like they’ve paid – good hearted, of course, but illegal. It’s about a man who confesses to a cold case murder the police have stopped investigating – why would he do that? And about a reporter who makes stuff up.

 

Will Jake and Jane find a way to be together? We shall see.

 

What have you read lately that you loved? Are there any authors who are on your personal must-read list?

 

Personal must read - Lisa Scottoline. John Lescroart. Ian Rankin. Julia Spencer-Fleming. Sue Grafton, the master!  I love Nelson DeMille’s John Corey books and William Landay’s Defending Jacob. Dennis Lehane, of course. Gone Girl, I’m a fan.

 

New books? Look for M. P. Cooley’s Ice Shear, Rachel Howzell Hall’s Land of Shadows. Jenny Milchman’s Ruin Falls and Chris Pavone’s (he wrote the Edgar Award-winning The Expats) new The Accident. (Unique! But great.)

 

As for me, I’m in the midst of writing What You See – In solving a murder, Jake wonders why cameras don’t lie – but photographs do.  And Jane’s own family puts her in deadly danger. That’s what you get when you plan a wedding, right? 

Beth

 
 

Between the Covers with Sharon Sala

The Curl Up & DyeSharon SalaSharon Sala, a prolific and successful writer with over 1 million books sold, ventures into the world of Southern women’s fiction in The Curl Up & Dye. Blessings, Georgia, springs to glorious life, along with its unique and quirky residents, especially LilyAnn Bronte, a former Peachy-Keen Queen. After losing her almost fiancé in the war in Iraq, her zest for life was zapped and she let herself go for 11 years. Finally, LilyAnn gives in to the ladies of the local beauty parlor, The Curl Up & Dye, and starts to get herself back in the game. This happily coincides with the arrival of a new hottie in town who provides LilyAnn with further motivation. But was love already in Blessings the whole time? A little bit Steel Magnolias and a little bit ­­­­­­­­­­When Harry Met Sally equals a whole lot of fun.

Get to know Sala as she sheds light on her creative process, offers a sneak peak at what’s next in Blessings and shares plenty more, including the Hollywood superstars she would cast to bring The Curl Up & Dye’s romantic duo to life on the big screen.    

 

The Curl Up & Dye is such a fun slice of Southern life but represents a departure from the romantic suspense genre in which you’ve achieved such great success. What prompted the change and what challenges were created?

 

I love that you enjoyed The Curl Up & Dye. It was so much fun creating and then living in that world. As for what prompted it, I’ve been writing in different genres for several years now. Young adult, women’s fiction, Western historical (humor) romantic suspense and straight fiction. Going the Southern route was a breeze and so much fun. As for challenges, there were none. As a writer, it’s freeing creatively to do something different. Keeps me fresh, creatively speaking.

 

In all of your books, your characters are engaging, the stories gripping and the romance palpable. What sparks your ideas after so many successful stories?

 

My ideas are my dreams. I just write what the universe gives me. As for keeping the stories fresh, I think it would be fair to say that it’s the characters themselves who lead me through the maze that becomes their lives. Once you try to force a scene to work, you’ve already lost your way. I just let the characters tell me what comes naturally to them and then find a way to let the reader see it as I do.

 

I know you’ve said it was a hated job that led you to writing, but was writing professionally always a dream? And what was that hated job?

 

The hated job was checking groceries, and I never imagined, even once, of becoming a professional writer. I was just a dreamer with thousands of stories in my head, and one day the hated job triggered an urge to put down on paper what I was seeing in my head.

 

Share some of your process. Do you write every day? Where? Whom do you use as a sounding-board? 

 

Yes, I write every day, but my writing process no longer exists because I also care for my 94-year-old mother who lives with me and who has dementia and no short-term memory. It is daily chaos but also a sweet sad journey for the both of us. I write when I can and am thankful that my process for writing is naturally fast. I have no sounding board but myself. I am also my worst critic.

 

You just got the call that The Curl Up & Dye is being made into a movie and you have free reign with the casting. What’s your dream cast? Do you use celebrities as models for your characters when you’re writing?

 

The dream cast is Jennifer Lawrence as LilyAnn and Channing Tatum as Mike. They both have an ability to do sweet/funny/dramatic, and the story calls for all three. No, I never use a picture of anyone to create the characters in my books. They’re already in my head as themselves.

 

Will you be returning to Blessings in a future novel? Can you give us a sneak peak?

 

Yes, I am happy to say that I’m going back to Blessings this year writing a book called Family Specials. Of course The Curl Up & Dye plays a pivotal role in how the plot plays out, but the story is entirely different from the others.

 

It’s about two teenagers: a boy and his two little brothers and a girl and her baby boy, who have been thrust into adult roles far too soon and who find a way to team up to save their families and, in doing so, finally fall in love long after the wedding has taken place.

 

It is a story that makes my heart happy. I look forward to sharing it with you.

Maureen

 
 

Between the Covers with Laura Lippman - Exclusive Interview!

After I'm GonePhoto by Jan CobbBaltimore author Laura Lippman is a favorite of many BCPL readers. Her new stand-alone novel, After I’m Gone, brings together past and present in a suspenseful, character-driven story about the family of a fugitive living their lives in the wake of scandal. On July 4, 1976, Felix Brewer flees from Baltimore rather than face a jail sentence. He leaves behind his wife, Bambi, his three young daughters and his mistress, Julie. In 2012, Roberto “Sandy” Sanchez, a consultant for the Baltimore Police Department, reopens the cold case file of the murder of Felix’s mistress, Julie. Lippman skillfully weaves the threads of what happens to each of the women in Felix’s life with Sandy’s investigation to bring the reader to the unexpected conclusion.

 

Lippman recently answered some questions for our Between the Covers readers. She tells us more about the inspiration for this story and a new movie adaptation of one of her novels.

 

Your husband, David Simon, originally suggested that you write about Julius Salsbury, head of a large gambling operation in Baltimore who disappeared in the 1970s rather than face jail time, but you weren’t initially interested in that story. What changed?

 

I am pretty resistant to other people’s ideas. It’s a personal thing, writing a novel. It’s a year out of my life. And perhaps I wasn’t listening as closely as I should have because David probably did emphasize that he thought the novel would be about the women affected. But it was when I started thinking about the daughters, saw a story beyond a love triangle, that I saw how I could do it.

 

Felix’s disappearance frames the story, but it’s quickly apparent that the novel isn’t really about him. It’s about those left behind. What is it about these five women that captured your imagination?

 

We define ourselves by our relationships. We are wives, girlfriends, daughters, sisters. What if one of those relationships is taken away? Who are we then? How do we adjust? The same would be true of men, by the way. Sandy, the retired cop in the novel, very much identifies himself as a widower, as someone who was married and is now alone, unhappily so.

 

What kind of research did you do for After I’m Gone?

 

I mainly tried to make sure the pop culture lined up. I remember being very disappointed to find out that Michelle’s bat mitzvah was just ahead of the introduction of the bubble skirt. I wanted all the Brewer women to be in fashion-forward bubble skirts.

 

Sandy meets Tess Monaghan near the end of the story, and the two of them talk business. Will readers see Sandy again in the future?

 

Oh, yes.

 

The movie adaptation of Every Secret Thing, starring Diane Lane, Elizabeth Banks and Dakota Fanning, is in post-production. What was it like to see that story come to life on film? When will the movie be released?

 

The film has been accepted by a major film festival, but that’s not official yet. The hope is it will find national distribution there. The whole experience was wonderfully surreal. It was as if the games I played with my Barbie dolls, all those years ago, had come to life.

 

Are there any authors on your personal must-read list? What have you read recently that you loved?

 

My must-read list includes Megan Abbott, Alex Marwood, Alison Gaylin, Rebecca Chance, Ann Hood, Stewart O’Nan, Tom Perrotta, Dennis Lehane, Georgoe Pelecanos, Mark Billingham, Andre Dubus III, Alafair Burke – shall I go on?

 

I also just had the privilege of guest-editing Best American Mystery Stories [2014], so I’ve been reading amazing short stories – but I can’t say by whom.

Beth