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Between the Covers / Shhhh... we're reading.   Photo of reading after bedtime
Melanie Brevis

A former day care teacher, Peace Corps volunteer, and non-profit worker, Melanie Brevis enjoys the many surprises that fill her days when she's surrounded by people, communities, and of course books! As a librarian at the Perry Hall Branch, she looks forward to all aspects of her job and is always ready to recommend a good book, especially true crime, biographies or fiction at any age level. Melanie enjoys a variety of genres, especially realistic fiction and family sagas, but also spends a lot of time reading picture books with her young son.

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Bloggers

 

Oh What a Tangled Web

Truth and ConsequencesThe Wizard of LiesHe really did deceive the entire world.  In a moment’s time, thousands of organizations and individuals worldwide lost their financial savings when Bernie Madoff’s massive investment fraud was uncovered.  The widespread public outrage was directed not only at him but also his family.  Surely those closest to him knew everything and were reaping all the benefits, right?  Two recent books tell otherwise. 

 

The first, Truth and Consequences: Life Inside the Madoff Family, by Laurie Sandell, chronicles the lives of his wife Ruth and sons Mark and Andrew both before and after the 2008 revelation that brought the financial empire crashing down.  Ruth, who was married to Madoff from the age of 18, had all property seized.  Mark committed suicide two years to the day of his father’s arrest.  Andrew struggled to rebuild his own reputation in the business community.  The writing at times entertains frivolous details and inconsequential family spats but provides an honest look into a tightly controlled family whose trusted patriarch was their ultimate undoing. 

 

While Truth and Consequences focuses more on family dynamics and less on the actual logistics of Madoff’s crime, The Wizard of Lies: Bernie Madoff and the Death of Trust by Diana B. Henriques gives a detailed recounting of the Ponzi  scheme itself.  Henriques, a financial writer for the New York Times and one of the few to interview Madoff in prison, follows a substantial “cast of characters” including family members, accountants, federal  investigators and lawyers to examine how a respected businessman could carry out deception on such a grand scale.  If her earlier narrative seems dry and overwhelming in places, the latter half of the book provides plenty of courtroom drama and emotional testimony to keep readers engaged.  As both authors note, family members and outsiders alike had their lives upended by the “Wizard of Lies”, and the rebuilding for many has just begun. 

Melanie

 
 

Families: Lost and Found

Families: Lost and Found

posted by:
April 30, 2012 - 1:00am

Red Ruby Heart in a Cold Blue Sea Lost Saints of TennesseeGirlchild Every family has a story.  Three recent debut novels explore the unraveling of fragile families and the ever-present need for human connection.  In Red Ruby Heart in a Cold Blue Sea by Morgan Callan Rogers, twelve-year-old Florine is growing up in a small Maine coastal town when her mother mysteriously disappears.  The disappearance has profound effects on Florine and her father and shapes the course of each of their lives.  Beautiful and tragic, Rogers provides a realistic look at small town life and independent people who must regroup and forgive if they are to build anything. 

 

In another book about familial relationships, The Lost Saints of Tennessee by Amy Franklin-Willis follows a Tennessee family from the 1940s to the 1980s.  The main character, Zeke, is still haunted by the drowning which claimed his twin brother over a decade prior.  Faced with divorce and strained relationships with other family members, he impulsively leaves town.  His time away allows him to reflect and he eventually faces both the flaws and strengths of the family that shaped his life.

 

The most tragic and hardscrabble of the three novels is Tupelo Hassman’s Girlchild. Hassman presents the dangerous and lost world of a Nevada trailer park through the eyes of one fractured family.  Rory Dawn Hendrix is seen by her family as their only hope.  She is smart, resourceful, and insightful, a change from the previous generations of Hendrix women.  Yet she is also still just a young girl, and the dangers of the community and its members threaten to engulf her and her plans for the future. 

 

Any of these three books would be good to take along on a vacation or for discussion at book clubs.  Enjoy, and look for more books from these authors in the future!

Melanie

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Ghosts, Mysterious Doors, and…Herbalists? Oh my!

The Night StrangersHalloween is long past, but readers can recreate the ambiance with Chris Bohjalian’s (Midwives, The Double Bind) new book The Night Strangers.  Set in a small town in upstate New Hampshire, a community’s sinister secrets are gradually unearthed, creating a satisfyingly creepy tale. 

 

The setting says it all.  An isolated town with spotty cell phone reception.  A spooky Victorian house with a mysterious door in the basement.  Disturbing rumors about the former owners.   Enter Chip, who moves his family to this house after a passenger plane he was piloting crashes and kills almost everyone on board.   As they settle in, the family discovers unnerving elements about their new home, including hidden weapons and a heavily bolted door in the basement.  They also meet some unsettling townspeople, the “herbalists”, who have taken a special interest in the twin daughters.  As the story further unfolds, the reader follows Chip in his battle with post-traumatic stress disorder and his slow descent into a world of ghosts and voices from the beyond.

 

This is a refreshing read because it is, simply, a ghost story with plenty of psychological terror (think Stephen King’s earlier books like The Shining) and a subtly frightening cast of side characters.  And like any good horror story, the family doesn’t see the danger until it’s too late.  All the signs are there, questions are raised, but (sigh) the family stays.  Although this book is a departure from Bohjalian’s usual style and lacks any real shocking twists or mind-bending ending, it is still a mature tale with a conclusion that leaves much room for discussion.  Interestingly, the author himself lives in an old home with a strange door in the basement…

Melanie