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Between the Covers / Shhhh... we're reading.   Photo of reading after bedtime
Maureen

Maureen enjoys books from every corner of the library, including the children's room. She will share her favorite fun adult books and also give you titles to bring home for the kids! When not working in the Collection Development department, Maureen can be found rooting for the Ravens or relaxing at the Jersey shore.

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Bloggers

 

Against All Odds

Against All Odds

posted by:
February 14, 2013 - 8:01am

The Queen of KatweThe inspirational story of a Ugandan teen is deftly shared by Tim Crothers in The Queen of Katwe: a Story of Life, Chess, and One Extraordinary Girl’s Dream of Becoming a Grandmaster. Phiona Mutesi lives in poverty with her mother and three siblings. Meals are hard to come by and Phiona’s education has been haphazard at best.  In 2005, at age nine, Phiona met Robert Katende, who had also grown up in slums, was a war refugee, and worked tirelessly as a missionary. His dream was to empower children through chess – highly unlikely since the game was so foreign there wasn’t even a word for it in the children’s language.

 

Children were enticed to the chess lessons by the promise of porridge, but soon many grew to love the game. Of these children, Phiona stood out as a talented, thinking chess player. In 2007, she was her country’s junior champion and continued winning titles over the next several years. In September 2010, she traveled to Siberia to compete in the Chess Olympiad, the world’s most prestigious team-chess event. Although she didn’t win, she did earn the respect of competitors and teammates. The Queen of Katwe is the story of a young girl struggling against every conceivable obstacle to pursue her dream. Readers will root and hope that Phiona will one day succeed as a Grandmaster and will remember her uplifting spirit long after the book is closed.

 

Crothers first shared Phiona’s story in an ESPN Magazine article, which was a finalist for the National Magazine Award. To hear some of the story in Phiona’s own words, watch this video from ESPN. In September, 2012, Phiona again competed in the Chess Olympiad, and her strong performance earned her the title of Woman Candidate Master, making her the first titled female player in Ugandan history. This fantastic dream may just become reality. 

 

Maureen

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Sugar and Spice - Twice as Nice!

Who's WhoThe Twins' BlanketTake Two! A Celebration of TwinsTake a peek inside the mysterious and mischievous world of twins in three books for children with appeal for multiples and singletons alike. The nineteenth century counting rhyme “Over in the Meadow” inspired Ken Geist’s Who’s Who which puts the spotlight on twin animals. These six pairs of twins include calves, bunnies, monkeys, and fish and are featured in their natural habitats. Illustrator Henry Cole vividly depicts these landscapes in acrylic and colored pencil and moves from farmyard to jungle to bat cave. The memorable rhymes highlight the twins’ activities through the day and match the warm, detailed illustrations.

 

The Twins’ Blanket, written and illustrated by Hyewon Yum, shares the story of identical twin sisters who at age five are growing up and a little apart. The girls’ favorite blanket is no longer big enough for sharing, so Mom creates new blankets for each girl with pieces from the old. Yum does a fabulous job of differentiating between these twins, by giving each girl her own side of the book. It isn’t until the girls reach out to comfort each other that they cross over the center of the book. Yum, a twin herself, uses prints, colored pencil, watercolor, and other media in her bright illustrations, and makes great use of white space to complement the quiet, narrative text.

 

In Take Two: a Celebration of Twins, J. Patrick Lewis, the current Children's Poet Laureate teams with Jane Yolen to present more than forty poems about life as a twin. Sophie Blackall’s watercolor, pencil, and collage illustrations complement the varied poems which are divided into sections representing stages and milestones, and a final section features famous twins. Lewis is a twin himself and Yolen is the grandmother of twins, so the two are quite familiar with the world of doubles. Readers will also enjoy the “Twin Fact” feature found throughout, such as the Russian woman who was mother to sixteen sets of twins, seven sets of triplets, and four sets of quadruplets!

Maureen

 
 

The Fascination Continues

The Fascination Continues

posted by:
February 8, 2013 - 8:01am

The Missing Manuscript of Jane AustenJane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice remains one of the most popular and imitated classics although it has been two hundred years since its publication on January 29, 2013. Syrie James offers an intriguing addition to the many modern Jane Austen homages with The Missing Manuscript of Jane Austen, which presents a story-within-a-story, both of which will delight ardent fans. 

 

Librarian Samantha McDonough is travelling in Oxford when she stumbles across a letter in an old book of poetry. The letter is from Jane Austen to her sister Cassandra, and describes a manuscript Jane had lost while visiting an estate named Greenbriar in 1802. A missing Jane manuscript could be monumental and Samantha immediately begins researching. Her investigation leads her to the now-crumbling Greenbriar and its owner Anthony Whittaker. The two discover the pages in a secret compartment and begin reading The Stanhopes along with the reader. This purported Austen story introduces Rebecca Stanhope and her rector father, both snubbed by polite society because of a fabricated gambling charge. As Rebecca attempts to restore her father’s good name and discover the nefarious person spreading the lies, she encounters love. James does an excellent job of recreating Austen’s voice and setting and weaving two compelling stories. As the Stanhopes strive to regain their respectable position, Samantha and Anthony are caught up in their growing attraction, yet disagree on how to handle this invaluable treasure.

 

If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, Jane should be pleased as punch, although it is doubtful that she would ever surrender to such vanity. Syrie James is one of a multitude of authors, including P.D. James and Colleen McCullough, who have entries in the Jane Austen assembly. From spunky Bridget Jones to Colin Firth’s (as Mr. Darcy) unforgettable lake scene, Pride and Prejudice remains a touchstone for modern storytelling.   

Maureen

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The Secret Life of a Suburban Wife

The Secret Life of a Suburban Wife

posted by:
February 4, 2013 - 8:01am

 

Something NewJanis Thomas introduces readers to a memorable, modern mom in Something New. Ellen Ivers has it all: a model husband in Jonah, three beautiful children, a comfortable home, even a lovable dog. She also has a few extra pounds, no career, and a life of boredom.  At forty-two Ellen is questioning her life of carpooling, kids’ parties, and after-school activities. Her life is in a rut and she’s let herself go physically and emotionally. When her cousin challenges her to enter a blogging contest sponsored by Ladies Living Well Journal, Ellen is initially hesitant. It’s been years since she wrote professionally and she questions what to write about and who would really be interested in her life as a housewife. At the same time, she meets sexy cop Ben Campbell who is clearly interested in her-- and as more than a friend. His words, “If you don’t try something new, you might as well just stop” motivate Ellen to enter the contest and initiate a self-refurbishment plan.

 

Ellen begins blogging, exercising, and taking time with her appearance. Her blog posts attract increasing numbers of readers and her treadmill time is really paying off. Jonah is not entirely pleased about the new Ellen and cracks in their marriage start to widen. Ellen is thrilled with her appearance and delighted that her relationship with the married Ben has moved beyond simple flirtation. But just as her confidence and newfound career are on the rise, her family life starts to unravel. The journey Ellen faces is familiar and important, but Thomas peppers the story with laugh-out-loud moments amidst the real life situations.  Ellen is a funny, honest, and recognizable character who ultimately must choose what it is that will deliver the fulfillment she has been seeking.   

Maureen

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Independent Woman

Independent Woman

posted by:
January 31, 2013 - 8:45am

A Change of FortuneLady Eliza Sumner is a determined woman bent on recovering her fortune, her family name, and her dignity in A Change of Fortune by Jen Turano. Some slight obstacles include a lack of money, family, friends, and a loss of faith. After her father’s death, Eliza’s inheritance was stolen by his trusted manager and his wife, Eliza’s former governess. The despicable duo has fled to America where they are masquerading as British aristocracy. Eliza, with little more than enough money to pay for her way across the pond, arrives in New York with the intent of recovering her wealth and returning to London in a blaze of glory. She takes a post as governess to a wealthy family and begins plotting.

 

When Eliza’s employer presses her into attending a dinner party, a disguised Eliza (complete with padding and eyeglasses) meets the fabulous Beckett brothers – Zayne and Hamilton. Hamilton is an eligible widower who blames himself for his wife’s death and is devoted to his two children. Because of the failure of his first marriage, he has sworn off women and marriage. However, Eliza and he learn that they share a common enemy and find themselves thrown together repeatedly in their efforts to recover her fortune and save his business. Eliza and Hamilton aren’t without friends who try to help their cause, including Agatha, an opinionated suffragette who happens to be the eldest daughter of Eliza’s employers, Arabella, sister to the Beckett brothers, and Theodore Wilder, a dashing detective.

 

This debut inspirational historical romance is packed with humor, interesting characters, and a fast-moving plot. This is the first in the Ladies of Distinction series and will appeal to fans of Deeanne Gist and Cathy Marie Hake. For more fun with this zany crew, look for A Most Peculiar Circumstance in June where readers will be delightfully reacquainted with Theodore Wilder and Arabella Beckett.

 

 

Maureen

 
 

Science by the Numbers

100 Diagrams That Changed the WorldMad ScienceTwo intriguing new books tackle science, inventions, and diagrams, and are perfect for armchair scientists looking to learn a little more about those things that made the world what it is today. 100 Diagrams That Changed the World: From the Earliest Cave Paintings to the Innovation of the iPod by Scott Christianson takes on the world of diagrams and explores their value to society. Some significant diagrams stand on their own, such as the Rosetta Stone, but many are actual drawings or plans of something tangible, like the cotton gin. Each double-page spread of this interesting and quick read shares a different diagram that impacted the world profoundly. Christanson arranges the diagrams chronologically starting with the Chavet Cave Drawings and ending with the iPod. All the diagrams in between are clearly illustrated and accompanied by text containing information about the development and significance of that diagram.  Readers will be instantly drawn in by these diagrams that transformed the shape of the world and impacted not only science, but culture and history as well.

 

Mad Science: Einstein’s Fridge, Dewar’s Flask, Mach’s Speed, and 362 Other Inventions That Made Our World, edited by Randy Alfred, offers a day-by-day calendar of science and technology tidbits from Wired Magazine’s popular This Day in Tech blog. Entries from forty contributors serve to highlight the each episode, discussing its history and value and sharing other notable events from the same day. From the Gregorian calendar, the breathalyzer, and the ballpoint pen, to the first coin operated café (the Horn & Hardart Automat in Philadelphia), the inventions are intriguing, entertaining, and momentous. Equal opportunity is afforded to all scientific fields, so there really is something for everyone, even those who absolutely dreaded high school science.

Maureen

 
 

Lingerie, Louis Vuitton, and Murder

Lingerie, Louis Vuitton, and Murder

posted by:
January 18, 2013 - 8:01am

Murder UnmentionableIced ChiffonTwo delightfully determined women join the ranks of amateur detectives in these wonderful debuts marking the start of two cozy series. Both ladies are used to a little more glitz and glamour, but circumstances have reduced them to investigation while they maintain their senses of humor and careers in the world of fashion. Emma Taylor heads to Paris – Paris, Tennessee that is – in Murder Unmentionable by Meg London. She’s trading in her big city digs, job, and philandering ex-boyfriend to help revitalize her Aunt Arabella’s struggling lingerie boutique, Sweet Nothings. When her pesky cheat of an ex shows up, Emma is surprised, but unmoved. When that same pesky cheat shows up dead on the floor of her boutique, Emma becomes the prime suspect. Emma and her friends are determined to clear her name, but quickly realize that she will need more than silk and satin to keep her out of the big house. Readers will enjoy heading back to Paris, Tennessee again and again in future installments of the Sweet Nothings series to reacquaint themselves with this independent woman and her quirky friends.

 

Iced Chiffon by Duffy Brown introduces Reagan Summerside, still rebuilding after a nasty divorce left her with one dilapidated house and her expensive wardrobe. She and her Auntie Kiki turn the first floor of her home into a consignment shop called The Prissy Fox. Sales are slow at first, but my how things change when her ex-husband Hollis’ cupcake of a new wife turns up dead! Hollis is quickly the focus of the investigation, and Reagan realizes that he is going to use her home to finance his legal battle. Determined to solve the case, her boutique becomes rumor central as customers share leads while trying on vintage Vuitton. While enjoying this well-constructed mystery, readers will fall in love with the spunky Reagan and her witty asides as she struggles to make her new life work in fabulous Savannah, Georgia.

Maureen

 
 

Designing Men

Designing Men

posted by:
January 10, 2013 - 8:55am

The Things that MatterCarter's WayAmerican BeautyThree of today’s most celebrated designers offer unique books reflecting personal style and sharing ideas for frustrated DIYers. Friend of Oprah and nationally known designer Nate Berkus offers a twist on the traditional decorating book in The Things that Matter. This beautifully illustrated title combines his life story with a diverse tour of homes, including his family and some celebrity friends. His message regarding the value of the things we cherish is clear since these objects reflect our personalities. This will appeal to collectors and those who keep it simple, since it’s all about how the things we love and choose to surround ourselves with fill us with comfort and joy.

 

Carter Oosterhouse, the popular host of several of HGTV shows, is known for his simple design style. In Carter’s Way, he offers homeowners an inside look at his successful home design process. Each chapter covers a different room or area of the house and highlights the diversity of layouts in homes today.  He recognizes the intimidation experienced by homeowners when tackling design projects, but his laid-back attitude provides encouragement. Oosterhouse focuses on environmentally friendly, inexpensive, and readily-found materials, and the specific examples and striking photos illustrate his philosophy.   

 

Thom Filicia is a respected professional designer and former star of Queer Eye for the Straight Guy. American Beauty is homage to his two year renovation of a vacation home in the Finger Lakes region of New York. Filicia fell in love with the Lakes as a vacationing child, and the beauty of the area and the Skaneateles Lake is showcased here. Readers are treated to information about the history of his home and also given smart tips on making the right design choices. After two long years, Filicia created the house of his dreams and the 300 stunning photographs will appeal to anyone dreaming of the perfect retreat.

Maureen

 
 

Law & Order

Law & Order

posted by:
January 7, 2013 - 9:15am

Luther: The CallingLutherFans of the gripping BBC drama Luther will welcome the opportunity to meet an early incarnation of tormented Detective Chief Inspector (DCI) John Luther in Luther: The Calling. Readers meeting Luther for the first time will be quickly intrigued by this dedicated detective and head to the DVD shelves to grab copies of the first two seasons. Neil Cross, author of this prequel, is also the show’s creator and sole writer. Fans of the show know that the television series begins with the end of a ghastly case. The novel opens at that case’s inception which involves the savage murders of a young husband and his eight months pregnant wife, as well as the removal of the baby who may still be alive. This investigation and other horrific events lead Luther to an ethical cliff as the novel moves at a rapid pace toward a conclusion that coincides with the opening of episode one of the show.

 

At the heart of both the compelling series and this gripping, psychological thriller is Luther, a tormented investigator struggling with demons, including rage against the violent perpetrators he encounters. Luther is dedicated to his job to the point of self-annihilation, and his single-mindedness threatens his health and his marriage. His wife, Zoe, has always managed to keep Luther balanced. But lately, their relationship has been off kilter and Luther refuses to take time off to rest and repair. Zoe looks elsewhere for intimacy, while Luther continues in his blind quest to destroy evildoers.

 

As readers travel through some of the seamier sides of London, there is plenty of action, including graphic violence not for the squeamish. John Luther’s unique character will continue to develop as Cross is hard at work on a new Luther novel and filming of season three of the series starring the delectable and dashing Idris Elba is underway.

 

Maureen

 
 

Is Perception Reality?

Is Perception Reality?

posted by:
January 2, 2013 - 11:05am

Liar & SpyNewbery Medal winner Rebecca Stead is back with another gem for the middle grade crowd in Liar & Spy. Georges has a lot going on, not the least of which is his name. Yes, his parents named him Georges (silent s) after their favorite painter, pointillist Georges Seurat. Needless to say, this only gives the bullies at school more ammunition in their relentless torment. His former best friend is now ensconced in the cool crowd. Georges has had to move from the only home he knew following his father’s job loss. And his mother is working double shifts as a nurse at the hospital to get some much needed extra cash.

 

The only bright light is the Spy Club at his new apartment building led by the homeschooled Safer. He is convinced another tenant, the mysterious Mr. X, is up to nefarious dealings. Safer and Georges begin an intensive spying campaign, and Georges grows closer with Safer’s quirky family, including his appropriately named younger sister, Candy, whose appetite for sweets is insatiable. As the spy game becomes more extreme and Safer becomes more demanding, Georges is forced to question Safer’s honesty and motives all while dealing with a missing mother, who only communicates with Georges via messages on a Scrabble board. Georges avoids visiting his mother at work, and readers soon learn there is more to that situation than meets the eye.

 

As with Seurat’s paintings, Georges learns to look at the big picture, rather than focus on the small stuff. This is a fascinating coming of age story filled with twists and an appealing and relatable young man. Long after readers finish this book, they will be thinking about the questions posed regarding family, friendship, loyalty, perception, reality and truth.

Maureen