Between the Covers / Shhhh... we're reading.   Photo of reading after bedtime

Maureen enjoys books from every corner of the library, including the children's room. She will share her favorite fun adult books and also give you titles to bring home for the kids! When not working in the Collection Development department, Maureen can be found rooting for the Ravens or relaxing at the Jersey shore.

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ALA Youth Media Awards Announced

posted by: January 11, 2016 - 11:30am

Cover art for Finding WinnieCover art for Last Stop on Market StreetCover art for Gone Crazy in AlabamaThe most prestigious awards for teen and children's literature were announced by the American Library Association in Boston earlier this morning. Awards were given in a wide range of categories that covered all formats and age levels. A complete list of awards, winners and honorees can be found here.


The Caldecott Medal is awarded annually to the artist of the most distinguished American picture book for children. This year’s winner is Finding Winnie: The True Story of the World's Most Famous Bear written by Lindsay Mattick and illustrated by Sophie Blackall. Blackall's warm gouache-and-ink illustrations complement this story of the real bear who inspired the creation of the beloved Winnie-the-Pooh. Caldecott Honor winners include Trombone Shorty written by Troy Andrews and illustrated by Bryan Collier, Waiting written and illustrated by Kevin Henkes, Voice of Freedom: Fannie Lou Hamer: Spirit of the Civil Rights Movement illustrated by Ekua Holmes and written by Carole Boston Weatherford and Last Stop on Market Street written by Matt de la Pena and illustrated by Christine Robinson.


The oldest of the medals awarded, the John Newbery Medal, is awarded to the author of the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children. This year’s medal recipient is Matt de la Pena for Last Stop on Market Street, a picture book illustrated by Christine Robinson sharing the simple story of a young boy riding the bus with his grandmother and learning to find the beauty in everyday things.  Three books were selected as Honor winners: The War that Saved My Life by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley, Roller Girl by Victoria Jamieson and Echo by Pam Munoz Ryan.


The Michael L. Printz Award annually honors the best book written for teens, based entirely on its literary merit. This year’s winner is Bone Gap by Laura Ruby. Ruby blends mystery, romance and magical realism and draws the reader into this place and the story of Finn, an eighteen-year-old outsider who is the only witness to an abduction. Printz Honor awards went to Out of Darkness by Ashley Hope Perez and Ghosts of Heaven by Marcus Sedgwick.


The Coretta Scott King Awards are given to outstanding African American authors and illustrators of books for children and young adults that demonstrate an appreciation of African American culture and universal human values.  Bryan Collier received the Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award for his vibrant mixed media collages which bring to life the story of author Troy Andrews who shares his childhood dream of becoming a musician. Rita Williams-Garcia, one of the authors selected for this year’s inaugural BCReads, was awarded the Coretta Scott King Author Award for Gone Crazy in Alabama, the final installment in the heartwarming Gaither family series that began with One Crazy Summer. Congratulations also to local author, Ronald L. Smith, author of Hoodoo, for winning the Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe New Talent Author Award. Be sure to read more about our hometown winner in our interview with Smith earlier this year. 


The Rogue Not Taken

posted by: January 5, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Rogue Not TakenBestselling author Sarah MacLean brings TMZ to pre-Victorian times in The Rogue Not Taken, the first in her new Scandal & Scoundrel series. Lady Sophie Talbot preferred life as a commoner, but when her father’s success secured him an earldom she was thrust into the highest echelons of London society. Sophie shies from the spotlight until her philandering brother-in-law causes her to create a very public scene and earn the scorn of the aristocracy. Think along the lines of the Beyonce/Jay Z/Solange elevator incident and you’ve got the picture.


Vowing to leave London, she stows away in the carriage of Kingscote, the Marquess of Eversley. King is a charmer with an ill-deserved (but welcome) reputation as a rake. When Sophie is discovered, King is sure that she is trying to trick him into marriage despite her avowal that he is the last man she would ever marry. Sophie asks King to take her to her childhood home claiming a lost love is waiting for her. While he is disbelieving, he agrees to give her a ride.   


This will turn out to be the journey of a lifetime for these two who are at odds from the beginning and continue to snipe along the way. Yet when trouble strikes, they have each other’s backs and slowly the bickering turns to flirtatious banter and the sparks begin to fly. This compelling story is enhanced by MacLean’s fast-paced storytelling, clever dialogue and sharp wit. Sophie and King are clearly drawn, engaging characters whose emotional connection is palpable. This intense romantic journey is peppered with comedy and action while also serving as a cutting commentary on pre-Victorian upper class society.


The Marriage Pact

posted by: December 22, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Marriage PactIt’s Marci Thompson’s Big 3-0, and her life on this milestone birthday isn’t at all what she envisioned in M.J. Pullen’s debut The Marriage Pact. Instead of a successful career, a handsome husband, a couple of kids and a dream home, Marci is working a temp accounting job, having an affair with Doug, her married boss, and living in what used to be a motel room. But then Jake, one of her closest friends from back home in Atlanta, sends her a picture of a cocktail napkin contract the two of them drunkenly signed 10 years ago — they would get married if both were still single at 30.


The reappearance of this pact shakes Marci’s belief in her feelings for Doug, who is promising to leave his wife and start a real life with Marci. She puts Jake on the back burner, but is crushed when Doug unceremoniously dumps her because his wife is pregnant. While trying to stay strong at work, the depth of her pain is severe, and she finally realizes she needs to make big changes in her life to alter the bleakness of her future. She moves back to Atlanta where she has the support of family and friends, including Jake.  


Jake is ready to pick up where they left off, but Marci's heart is still recovering. The two take baby steps toward a real relationship and even get engaged, but have they really grown up? This is a fast-paced, funny read with likeable and charming characters who readers will look forward to meeting again as Pullen adds to this appealing series. Fans of Emily Giffin, Lauren Graham and Jennifer Weiner will delight in a new author to add to their list of favorites.



HAPPY 100TH Birthday, Frank Sinatra!

posted by: December 8, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Sinatra the ChairmanDecember 12 marks the 100th anniversary of Frank Sinatra’s birth, and three new books celebrate his legacy. Ol’ Blue Eyes remains an iconic figure in American culture with his mystique enduring long after his death in 1998.


Sinatra the Chairman by James Kaplan is a detailed examination of the life and career of this legendary performer. By delving into his complex relationships and prolific career, Kaplan exposes the multi-faceted layers that made this man —singer, actor, mogul, friend and lover. This is the follow-up to 2010’s Frank: The Voice and picks up in 1954, after Sinatra won an Academy Award and was firmly re-entrenched as a top selling recording artist.Cover art for Why Sinatra Matters


Award-winning author Pete Hamill’s Why Sinatra Matters was first published in 1999 and is being re-issued in time for the anniversary of Sinatra’s birth, along with a new introduction from the author. This book serves as both a unique homage and an insightful portrait of a complex man. Hamill’s beautifully written portrait brings to life a man whose entertaining touched so many generations. 


Cover art for Frank & Ava: in Love and WarFrank & Ava: In Love and War by John Brady fully explores this volatile relationship which shaped both their lives. Ava had two short-lived marriages behind her and a succession of high profile suitors when she and Frank met. The spark was instantaneous and the two began a tempestuous affair, despite Frank’s marriage which ended soon after in divorce. Frank and Ava’s subsequent marriage was a series of fights, separations and reconciliations which ultimately ended in divorce. Despite the not-so-happy ending, Brady’s exploration of this glamorous couple is compelling. Gossip columnist Liz Smith said of this duo, "If I had to go back in Hollywood history and name two people who were most desperately and passionately in love with each other, I would say Frank Sinatra and Ava Gardner were it." 


Want more? Check out this list of music, movies and more books featuring the Chairman of the Board.


National Book Award Winners

posted by: November 19, 2015 - 2:53pm

Cover art for Between the World and MeCover art for Fortune SmilesBaltimore native Ta-Nehisi Coates capped a remarkable year last night when he won the National Book Award for nonfiction for Between the World and Me, a frank narrative outlining his experience as a black man in America. Coates received a standing ovation from the crowd at Cipriani Wall Street and told the audience, “I wanted to make racism tactile, visceral. Because it is.” Coates wrote the memoir as a letter to his teenage son and dedicated last night’s award to Prince Jones, a classmate from Howard University who was killed by a police officer while unarmed. Coates’ award-winning title has been selected as the adult nonfiction title in Baltimore County’s inaugural community-wide read, BC Reads, coming in April.


Adam Johnson won the fiction award for Fortune Smiles, a collection of short stories dealing with a wide range of global subjects. The award for young people’s literature was given to Neal Shusterman’s Challenger Deep, a novel about a mentally ill teenager inspired by Shusterman’s son. Robin Coste Lewis won the poetry award for her debut collection Voyage of the Sable Venus, an exploration of race, gender and identity.


The National Book Award, which was established in 1950, has been awarded to some of the country’s most celebrated authors, including William Faulkner, Cormac McCarthy and Lillian Hellman. Presented by the National Book Foundation, the awards were open to American authors who published books from December 1, 2014, to November 30, 2015. The prizes were presented at a black-tie dinner, and all four winners will receive $10,000. Watch the entire ceremony, including all of the winners' acceptance speeches here.



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