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Leanne Farrell

Leanne's first memory is walking down a tree-lined street to the public library, and she hasn't been without a book since. Leanne enjoys narrative non-fiction and biographies, literary fiction and children and teen fiction, but her favorites are mysteries and thrillers. A native Marylander, when her nose isn't in a book, you'll find her rooting for the Orioles and the Ravens.

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Leanne

Song of the Lion

posted by: February 1, 2017 - 7:00am

Cover art for Song of the LionA deadly car bombing on a Navajo reservation sets in motion professional rivalries, intertribal tensions and an FBI investigation into possible eco-terrorism in Anne Hillerman’s Song of the Lion. Off-duty tribal officer Bernadette Manuelito is anticipating an epic battle between the current Shiprock High School basketball team and the old-time alumni seeking to recreate past glories. Instead, an explosion rocks the night, and Bernie is thrust into a miasma of fleeing spectators. In the parking lot lays the ruined remains of a BMW owned by the mediator of a multi-million dollar development intended for the Grand Canyon. Considering the highly controversial negotiations about to be conducted, it is assumed the mediator is the target of the attack. Bernie’s husband, tribal officer Jim Chee, is assigned to protect the very uncooperative potential murder victim.

 

 
While dozens of stakeholders plead their case for the future use of the land, sabotage threatens the hearings and tensions rise between the Hopi and Navajo tribes. As Bernie and Jim are drawn deeper into the case, what appears to be straightforward case against eco-terrorists becomes an investigation into a complex web of events buried deep in the past. Patiently plotting, this killer has waited a very long time to carry out his well-laid plans for revenge.

 

The sacred ground of the Grand Canyon provides the landscape for this latest entry in the Navajo detective series. Anne Hillerman proves herself a worthy keeper of the flame for her acclaimed father, Tony Hillerman. Like his, her writing is rich with the customs, lore and sacred myths of the Hopi and Navajo tribes. Readers of Craig Johnson, William Kent Krueger and Steve Hamilton will enjoy this haunting read.


 
 

Dear Amy

posted by: January 2, 2017 - 7:00am

Cover art for Dear AmyIn Helen Callaghan’s electrifying debut novel Dear Amy, a young teacher battles a faceless enemy to save an abducted student’s life. Margot Lewis teaches in an exclusive private high school in Cambridge, England. She has discovered a talent for reaching her students, and they often turn to her for advice. It’s a natural step for Margot to become an advice columnist for the local newspaper under the pseudonym Dear Amy. One day, Margot receives a letter that shakes her down to the depths of her soul. Dear Amy: I’ve been kidnapped by a strange man. I don’t know where I am. Please help me. It's signed by a young girl who went missing 20 years before.  

 

It is a desperate plea that Margot cannot ignore. The letter may be a hoax, but if it’s not, it could be the missing girl’s only chance at survival. When a student from Margot’s class goes missing, Margot knows she cannot stand idly by. Facing the possibility of being accused as a fraud, she takes the letter to the police, where it is authenticated as written by the missing girl. The police renew their investigation, and refer the case to criminologist Martin Forrester of Cambridge University. Together, Martin and Margot descend into the mind of a serial felon. Echoes from Margot’s past resonate into her present. Margot must conquer her own demons in order to defeat this new enemy.

 

Powerful, lyrical and taut with suspense, this literary thriller will seize you from the first page to the last. Helen Callaghan has woven a compelling tale of obsession and evil that takes her characters to the limits of their endurance. Laced with references to the classics, readers of Tana French, Peter Robinson and Gillian Flynn will appreciate the prose as well as the plot.


 
 

All the Little Liars

posted by: December 22, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for All the Little LiarsLibrarian and amateur sleuth Aurora Teagarden returns in Charlaine Harris’ latest mystery All the Little Liars. This should be one of the happiest times in Aurora’s life — she and her husband Robin Crusoe are expecting their first child. However, they have taken in Aurora’s 15-year-old brother, Phillip, while Aurora’s father and stepmother deal with their tempestuous marriage. Phillip discovered his father in a compromising position and foolishly hitchhiked across country to Aurora’s house, desperate to find some peace and stability. He has made a remarkably good adjustment to small town life, making new friends and joining in activities. Until one night, Phillip disappears with three of his friends. Another friend is found dead at their last known location.

 

Desperate to find her brother, Aurora sifts through the mess his parents have made of their family life. Is the kidnapping related to her father’s gambling? Or to his mother’s commune life? Could the neighborhood bullies be involved? Held responsible for Phillip’s disappearance by his parents, Aurora frantically takes some pretty desperate action. The police and FBI are constrained by the law, but Aurora and Robin have no such restrictions. They trace the four friends’ last known contacts and discover a malicious campaign of persecution and manipulation that shakes their faith to the core. Parenting in the digital age is a daunting task, and Aurora and Robin are just beginning to find out what it means to raise a child.

 

Charlaine Harris masterfully negotiates the minefield of blended families, bullying and the role of parents in their children’s moral development. She is the Anthony Award-winning author of the popular Sookie Stackhouse series, which became the basis for HBO’s True Blood. The Aurora Teagarden mysteries are now featured in a new series of mystery movies, which can be seen on the Hallmark Channel.


 
 

The Trespasser

posted by: November 14, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for The TrespasserA young woman’s life is cut short just as she is freed to pursue her own happiness in Tana French’s latest Murder Squad entry, The Trespasser. Aislynn Murray was a good girl, who took care of her mother after her father walked out on the family. After her mother’s death, Aislynn flowered; she lost weight, bought fashionable clothes and went to the salon. Without a normal family life as a guide, she modelled her world around what magazines portrayed. Frequenting trendy clubs, she was soon juggling two boyfriends. Until one night, Aislynn ended up with fist to the jaw and her head bashed in.  

 

Detective Antoinette Conway heads up the investigation into Aislynn’s murder, with Detective Steve Moran as her partner. She’s the only female detective in a male-dominated squad room, and spends a lot of her time looking over her shoulder. As the two newest members of the squad, they’re usually stuck with the open-and-shut domestic investigations. This time they may have caught a hot one that could launch their careers. What looks like a simple fight with a boyfriend isn’t so simple after all.

 

Tana French knows how to reach the reader viscerally. She explores her characters in their deepest darkest places and exposes their greatest anxieties. She is also adept at describing police procedure and investigation without gratuitous violence. French has won multiple awards for her work, including the Edgar Award for Best First Novel, In the Woods. She has combined great literary writing with the suspenseful plotting of a mystery with enormous success.  

 


 
 

Collecting the Dead

posted by: November 2, 2016 - 7:00am

Collecting the DeadMagnus “Steps” Craig uses his secret tracking abilities to locate the missing in Spencer Kope’s debut novel Collecting the Dead. Steps is one member of an elite three-man Special Tracking Unit of the FBI. He has a kind of sixth sense; he can see the substance of a person, something he calls “shine” — a colorful glow which every person leaves behind. His ability is known to only three people: his father, the director of the FBI and his partner, Special Agent Jimmy Donovan.

 

When the remains of yet another murdered woman are discovered, Magnus recognizes the shine left by the perpetrator from a previous crime. He also discovers the murderer’s trademark at both scenes — the mark of a sad face. At the same time, a killer known as Leonardo, who Magnus has been tracking for several years, has resurfaced and is taunting him. While desperately digging for a clue that will lead him to Leonardo, the case of the Sad Face Killer intensifies. The team identifies 11 potential victims — all missing women who fit the same scenario. While Magnus draws on all of his exceptional skills, he struggles with the pressure and guilt of knowing he is the only one who can save the next victim before it’s too late.

 

Author Spencer Kope is a professional crime analyst and his background provides strong authenticity. Kope’s debut novel introduces a sympathetic hero in a unique storyline. Fans of Walt Longmire, Jack Reacher and Charlie Parker will find Collecting the Dead a deeply satisfying read.


 
 

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