Between the Covers / Shhhh... we're reading.   Photo of reading after bedtime
Leanne Farrell

Leanne's first memory is walking down a tree-lined street to the public library, and she hasn't been without a book since. Leanne enjoys narrative non-fiction and biographies, literary fiction and children and teen fiction, but her favorites are mysteries and thrillers. A native Marylander, when her nose isn't in a book, you'll find her rooting for the Orioles and the Ravens.

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Leanne

The Silent Boy

posted by: January 13, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Silent Boy“Say nothing. Not a word to anyone.” So begins the painful odyssey of a frightened child in Andrew Taylor’s The Silent Boy. It is 1792 in Paris, and The Terror has begun. Turmoil grips the city. As the violence spins out of control, it overtakes anyone in its path. Terrified and covered in blood, the boy races through the streets of Paris to find an old servant who worked for his mother. She takes him to Monsieur Fournier, who believes the boy is his son. Together they escape to England to stay at desolate Charnwood Court.

 

Edward Savill, employed as an agent in London for a wealthy American, is informed that his estranged wife has been murdered in Paris. She has left behind Charles, a 10-year-old boy suffering from hysterical muteness. The boy cannot possibly be Savill’s, but he is still married to Charles’ mother and legally responsible for his welfare. Charles also has a half-sister, Lizzie, who is anxious to bring him home.

 

These conflicting interests clash to create an unrelentingly suspenseful tale. Savill, the wronged husband, is fiercely determined to provide for the boy; Fournier, the former lover, holds onto him as a talisman. Behind the scenes, political interests far more powerful than these two men pull the strings. Taylor has drawn such achingly real characters that the desire to rescue the boy is palpable. With characters reminiscent of Dickens, this tale creates a level of insecurity in the reader that mirrors Charles predicament.

 

Andrew Taylor is the author of several thrillers, including The Office of the Dead and The American Boy, both of which won Britain’s Ellis Peters Historical Dagger award, making Taylor the only author to receive the prize twice. With The Silent Boy he surely has another winner.

 


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Golden Age

posted by: December 18, 2015 - 7:00am

Golden AgeThe saga of the Langdon family continues with the much-anticipated third volume of the Last Hundred Years trilogy, Golden Age by Jane Smiley. Resuming the story in 1987, the youngest generation comes of age at a time of high-stakes finance, political intrigue and new ways of farming that challenge the family homestead. Complacently assured, Congressman Richie Langdon does just enough of his political homework to be consistently reelected. His twin brother Michael, ever the financial wizard, sees opportunities in every weakness. Charlie, the newly discovered nephew, faces life with unconquerable optimism regardless of his struggle for a purpose. Guthrie, once the inevitable heir to the family farm, fights in Afghanistan instead. Meanwhile, the whole world faces an insidious new enemy determined to destroy.
 

As tragedies both domestic and international test this family, their one foundation rests solidly on the family farm. While the globe rages with anger, in the end, it becomes apparent that not all enemies are far from home.
 

Smiley weaves the profound events of the late 20th century through her characters’ lives with a deft hand. The chronicle of so many lives is an ambitious undertaking, and yet each character remains genuine and unique. She begins with a family gathering, which serves as a refresher of the broad cast of characters. A helpful family tree is also included. The chapters are organized by each year, moving through the lives of each individual, young and old.
 

Jane Smiley is the author of several novels, including A Thousand Acres, for which she won the Pulitzer Prize. The first entry in the Last Hundred Years trilogy is Some Luck, followed by Early Warning. Reading these titles in order is strongly recommended. Spending time with the Langdon family is highly enjoyable.
 


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Away in a Manger

posted by: December 14, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Away in a MangerRhys Bowen conjures all the ambiance and bustle of New York City at Christmastime in her newest mystery Away in a Manger. Just barely heard above the crowd, a high, sweet voice sings the old Christmas carol. Molly Murphy and her ward Bridie discover the source; a little girl of no more than six, huddling in a doorway, holding a tin cup and hoping the holiday spirit will make people generous. For in 1905, there are no laws or agencies to protect children in need. Deeply touched, Molly and Bridie speak to the girl and soon realize she is intelligent and well-mannered. Both the girl and her older brother have been cast out into the street to make money any way they can by a cruel aunt who barely keeps them alive.

 

Inquisitive Molly cannot keep herself from getting involved. It seems the children’s mother has disappeared and their father has died. All they have left of their old life is an obviously valuable brooch. If the mother had means, why are her children reduced to begging? Do the children have other relatives who would care for them? Molly resolves to unravel their past and provide them with a better future.

 

Away in a Manger is a sweet and simple account of children no one will welcome, paralleling the traditional story of Christmas. Rhys Bowen brings to light the plight of children before principled people took a stand in their defense. While this is the latest in a long running series, this title can be read independently. This lucid and powerful tale reminds us that generosity and goodwill triumph over greed and evil, a thought even more compelling in this day and age.  
 


 
 

Sit! Stay! Speak!

posted by: December 3, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Sit! Stay! Speak!A wounded young woman picks up the pieces of her shattered future to start a new life in a small Southern town in Sit! Stay! Speak! by Annie England Noblin. Adelaide owns an antique furniture business with her fiancé, Jonah, and is busily planning the final details of their wedding when tragedy strikes. While rushing to an appointment, Jonah is killed on the interstate. For two years, she drifts in a daze, until her aunt dies and bequeaths Addie her home in the tiny town of Eunice, Arkansas.  

 

Reminiscing about blissful summers spent with her aunt, Addie decides to take a walk down to the levee. She is shocked to find that the lovely picnic spot on the Mississippi River has become neglected and strewn with garbage. Even more surprising is that the garbage moves of its own accord. An investigation of a discarded garbage bag reveals a pit bull puppy beaten, shot, and struggling to survive. Addie rushes to the local vet hoping to save the dog’s life, and in the end, finds the secret of saving her own.  

 

This debut novel is a promising start for animal rescuer and author Annie Noblin. The characters are quirky, entertaining and unforgettable. Noblin manages to convey Addie’s heartache without excessive sentimentality. The author subtly explores how the simplest decisions can have major ramifications for ourselves and those around us. As Addie rebuilds her house, she also rebuilds her life, and uncovers some surprises along the way. Whether or not you are a dog lover, if you enjoy romance, small town life or just a great story, Sit! Stay! Speak! is a sure winner. 


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The Murder Road

posted by: November 30, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Murder RoadInspector Ben Cooper must wade through old grudges to solve a baffling murder in The Murder Road by Stephen Booth.

 

There’s only one road providing access to the tiny hamlet of Shawhead, and Mac Kelsey’s abandoned truck is blocking the route. As outraged villagers demand action, Inspector Cooper must locate Mac the missing driver. There’s blood on the driver’s manifest, and a pool of blood on the cab’s floor. Evidence shows someone jumped from the bridge onto the roof of the truck cab. Unearthing Mac’s fate becomes a trek over fields and moors and memories of bygone days. Struggling with demons from his own past, Cooper faces some tough decisions about his future.  

 

This is the 15th book in the Barry Award-winning Cooper and Fry mysteries, but this work is a great introduction to a consistently quality series. Booth weaves a tale as enigmatic and murky as the moors themselves. Inspector Cooper is a relentless pursuer of details, and it is Booth’s careful weaving of suspicion, pursuit, suspense and evidence that produces such a gripping mystery. Fans of Peter Robinson and Elizabeth George will sure to be pleased with this original police procedural.

 


 
 

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