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Between the Covers / Shhhh... we're reading.   Photo of reading after bedtime
Laura George

A recent graduate of the University of Toronto library science program and native Baltimorean, Laura George loves being able to talk books with library customers. She reads across genres, particularly literary fiction, historical fiction, and young adult novels. Laura is a self-professed Anglophile, and lover of everything Jane Austen. When not working at the Catonsville branch, Laura enjoys watching television and baking.

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Modern Romance

Modern Romance

posted by:
August 13, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Modern RomanceParks and Recreation star Aziz Ansari is the latest comedian to try his hand as an author. Rather than write the typical memoir, Ansari has joined sociologist Eric Klinenberg to study dating in Modern Romance. Ansari and Klinenberg conducted research around the world in an attempt to discover how romance has changed in recent years and present it to readers in relatable way.

 

The pair started their research by asking residents of a New York retirement community how they found love when they were in their early 20s. They used this as a baseline to compare with the results from focus groups about modern romance. Some in the groups even allowed Ansari and Klinenberg to look through their phones to see how they interacted with potential mates through texts or on various online dating apps like Tinder or OkCupid. The pair also analyzed differences around the world, interviewing people from the United States, Argentina, France and Japan. The cultural differences were striking, as were the differences between larger cities in the United States, like New York City and Los Angeles, and smaller cities like Monroe, New York and Wichita, Kansas.

 

Modern Romance may not be what longtime fans of Ansari expect, but this sociological look at the world of dating is infused with his signature humor. Those familiar with Ansari’s standup routines will see similarities from some of his bits, such as analyzing people’s text messages. Listening to the book adds another layer of humor, with Ansari as the narrator who occasionally steps beyond that role to make fun of the listener. Modern Romance is an informative, funny look at the world of dating.

 

Laura

 
 

Finding Audrey

Finding Audrey

posted by:
August 10, 2015 - 7:00am

Finding Audrey by Sophie KinsellaSophie Kinsella, of Shopaholic series fame, returns with the new teen novel Finding Audrey. Protagonist Audrey is a 14-year-old British teen who has undergone severe bullying at the hand of her classmates. This has caused her a great deal of anxiety and depression, which leads to her leaving school, wearing dark glasses all the time and rarely leaving her house.

 

Audrey’s family is incredibly supportive of her, even if they don’t always understand her anxiety disorder. Her family, consisting of mom, dad, older brother Frank and younger brother Felix, provide levity throughout the story. Their antics, which Audrey records in a video diary that her supportive therapist suggests she make, are hilarious. When her brother’s friend, Linus, begins coming over to their house to practice for a gaming tournament, Audrey is pushed out of her comfort zone. She finds herself relearning how to interact with people other than her family. As Audrey becomes more comfortable with Linus, she finds herself wanting to push herself more, at times frustrated with what she thinks is her slow progress.

 

Kinsella has written an honest portrayal of a teen with anxiety — Audrey isn’t magically fixed, but has to work hard to make progress with a combination of therapy and medication. Finding Audrey is at times funny, sad and romantic — switching between video diary script and traditional prose. Kinsella has written a novel that will appeal to teen readers as much as it does to adults.

Laura

 
 

Emmy & Oliver

Emmy & Oliver

posted by:
July 31, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Emmy & OliverRobin Benway’s latest novel, Emmy & Oliver begins when the title characters, on a day that neither of them will ever forget. That day, Oliver’s father picks him up after school and runs away with him. From that point onward, Emmy’s childhood is filled with news media obsessed with the missing child case, nervous parents and a missing best friend. Even 10 years later, she’s still highly affected by Oliver’s disappearance—she still wonders about Oliver and keeps secrets from her parents to gain back some of the freedom she lost when Oliver disappeared. She has secretly learned to surf, keeping her surfboard hidden in her car, and applied to a college with a good surfing team—all without letting her parents know.

 

When Oliver suddenly reappears at age 17, both their lives are upended once again. All Emmy wants is to pick up where they left off. However, she and their other childhood friends, Caro and Drew, are cautioned to give him space to let him readjust. Whereas Oliver, who has missed his mom and his friends for 10 years, now finds himself missing his dad and having difficulties adjusting to his old life. Forced by their parents, the two begin spending time together again after Oliver has been home for a few weeks. Their initially uneasy friendship begins to turn into something else, as they discover they can share things with each other that they can’t tell anyone else.

 

Emmy & Oliver is a sweet novel with a heartbreaking premise. Benway creates characters that readers quickly feel like they’ve known for years. Fans of Gayle Forman and Sarah Dessen will enjoy Benway’s new novel.

 

Laura

 
 

Saint Anything

Saint Anything

posted by:
June 19, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Saint AnythingPerennial teen favorite Sarah Dessen’s latest novel, Saint Anything, is sure to capture the hearts of readers. Sydney has grown up in the shadow of her older brother Peyton, who has always been more popular and attractive — not to mention her parents’ favorite. Now she’s in his shadow for a completely different reason, as he’s just been sentenced to jail time for paralyzing a young boy during a drunk driving accident. As Peyton heads off to jail, Sydney’s family reels in the aftermath.

 

Sydney feels an immense amount of guilt because neither her parents nor Peyton seem to care about the boy he hurt. This is one of the things that pushes her to transfer from her elite private school to a large public school where no one will know her or her brother. What she doesn’t expect is to find a friend in Layla and her loud, boisterous, fun family. Layla’s family owns Seaside Pizza, where she and Sydney spend time after school, eating pizza and lollipops. Sydney also finds herself intrigued by Layla’s older brother Mac. Layla and her family make Sydney feel like she’s no longer in her brother’s shadow.

 

Saint Anything is a wonderful addition to Dessen’s novels. Longtime fans will count Sydney among their favorite heroines, while those new to Dessen will enjoy the well-drawn characters. Dessen is frequently called a romance writer, but her novels are much more than romance. While Saint Anything does have romance, it's also about family, forgiveness and finding oneself.

 

Laura

 
 

Things We Know by Heart

Things We Know by Heart

posted by:
May 27, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Things We Know By HeartAt the end of her junior year, the unthinkable happened to Quinn Sullivan when her boyfriend Trent was killed in an accident. Quinn is destroyed by her loss and, in her grief, begins to focus on the people who received Trent’s donated organs. Many of these people respond to her when she reaches out to them, with the exception of the teen who received Trent’s heart. Quinn becomes obsessed with finding this teen, and when Jessi Kirby’s Things We Know by Heart begins, she has done just that.

 

Quinn travels to the nearby town of Shelter Cove to investigate Colton Thomas, the heart patient who received Trent’s heart. The two bump into each other at the local coffee shop. Colton is immediately taken by Quinn, and much to her surprise, Quinn feels the same about him. Despite her fear of forgetting Trent, Quinn can’t help but want to spend time with Colton. Colton’s fun-loving attitude begins to pull Quinn out of her grief, but she keeps being pulled back by their connection through Trent.

 

Kirby has done a wonderful job writing a unique teen romance. Each chapter begins with a quote about the heart, some medical, some from literature, others from philosophy. Quinn and Colton’s story will capture the reader’s attention from the very first chapter. Fans of Sarah Dessen’s novels will enjoy Things We Know by Heart.

Laura

 
 

All the Rage

All the Rage

posted by:
May 21, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for All the Rage

Romy Grey, the protagonist of Courtney Summers’ All the Rage has always been an outcast in her small town — hated by everyone at school because her father is the town drunk and she’s not from a “good” family. She uses bright red nail polish and lipstick as armor, trying to deflect attention from her past. She spends her time after school working at a diner in a neighboring town where no one knows who she is. When the book begins, Romy has gone from outcast to social pariah after she accuses Kellan Turner, the beloved sheriff’s son, of raping her at a high school party. All the Rage tackles a difficult subject and focuses on Romy and how this assault has affected her.

 

Her work at Swan’s Diner is the only bright spot in her days — Leon, who works the grill (and obviously has a crush on Romy), tries to befriend her and begins to break through some of the walls she has built. Romy tries to lay low at school, but her classmates torment her on a daily basis. Their cruel behavior worsens when another girl at school disappears after the annual senior party, “Wake Lake.” Romy is found on the side of the road after the same party, and her classmates blame her for for the other girl’s disappearance. As the town searches for the missing girl, Romy wants to know if what happened to her and the girl’s disappearance are linked.

 

Much like Laurie Halse Anderson’s Speak, Summers has done her part to raise awareness about sexual assault with All the Rage. Romy is a realistic, angry, confused character who struggles to process what has happened to her and her community’s response to her accusations.

Laura

 
 

Bone Gap

Bone Gap

posted by:
April 29, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Bone GapLaura Ruby’s Bone Gap is a beautifully told story that teen and adult readers alike will enjoy. Finn O’Sullivan and his older brother Sean have lived in the town of Bone Gap by themselves since their mother abandoned them a few years before the novel begins — that is until Roza appears as if by magic. After a nasty storm, Finn finds Roza, a Polish immigrant, hiding in a bale of hay in their barn. Roza is clearly hurt, but refuses to explain how or give any other information about herself. The brothers let her stay with them, and eventually she becomes like another member of the family, helping around their farm and becoming a well-liked member of their small town.

 

A year later, Roza is kidnapped, and Finn, the only witness, can’t give a good enough description to help police find her kidnapper. To add to his problems, no one believes that the distractible, “moon-faced” boy is actually a credible witness. Despite their apprehension about Finn’s claims, it turns out that he is correct — Roza has, in fact, been kidnapped by a terrible man who refuses to let her go. Roza tries her best to escape from captivity, but she can barely understand the place she’s being held, let alone escape from it. Meanwhile, as Finn investigates Roza’s disappearance, he becomes engrossed in a relationship with the prickly Priscilla, who only wants to be known as Petey. Petey, an odd-looking, self-conscious girl who is ridiculed by her classmates, believes that Finn’s obsession with finding Roza stems from romantic feelings for the missing girl.

 

Bone Gap alternates between the perspectives of Finn, Roza and Petey seamlessly. Ruby has woven a story that is wholly unique and utterly engrossing. Finn, Roza and Petey are each characters that the reader won’t want to leave behind when they close the book.

 

Laura

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Vanishing Girls

Vanishing Girls

posted by:
April 14, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Vanishing GirlsLauren Oliver’s latest novel Vanishing Girls, is told from the perspective of two sisters: Nick, short for Nicole, and Dara. Nick and Dara have always been close — that is, until the accident that leaves Dara with a nasty scar and the sisters emotionally distant. Vanishing Girls is a mysterious novel filled with suspense and a bit of romance.

 

The story begins before the accident that ruins their relationship when Nick is simply worried about her party-girl younger sister. However, it quickly jumps to after the accident when their lives have fallen to pieces. After living with her father for a few months after the accident, Nick moves home with her mother and Dara again. Dara, however, does whatever she can to avoid Nick, staying in her room all day and sneaking out of the house at night. Meanwhile, their mom forces Nick to work at the local amusement park, Fantasy Land. There, Nick reconnects with her former best friend and Dara’s ex-boyfriend, Parker. As Nick falls into the routine of work, her friendship with Parker picks up where it left off before the accident. But when Madeline Snow disappears, followed by Dara a few days later, Nick investigates the suspicious disappearances and learns that her sister had more secrets than she thought — secrets that may connect her to Madeline Snow.

 

Vanishing Girls is a suspenseful story that will keep readers guessing until the very end. Fans of E. Lockhart’s We Were Liars will enjoy this new novel from Lauren Oliver.

Laura

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Mirror, Mirror

Mirror, Mirror

posted by:
April 2, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for FairestMarissa Meyer’s Lunar Chronicles series continues with Fairest, the backstory of Queen Levana, the evil Lunar queen who has been trying to kill main character Cinder since book one. An in-between, shorter novel, leading up to Winter, which is set to be released in November, Fairest gives readers background knowledge on the villain we love to hate.

 

Meyer’s Lunar Chronicles is a futuristic series of fairy tale retellings filled with cyborgs, genetically engineered diseases and a civilization living on the moon. In each novel, Meyer bases her futuristic science fiction story on a well-known fairy tale, from Cinderella to Little Red Riding Hood to Rapunzel. Fairest is set years before the series begins. Levana, the Lunar queen has been a source of mystery since the first book, but now, Meyer provides an explanation, but not support for Levana’s actions throughout the rest of the series. Her story begins when Levana is but a princess whose parents have just died and follows her through her sister’s time as queen of Luna. Readers learn more about her romantic history and her relationship with the people of Luna. Longtime readers are also treated to appearances from characters they’ve come to know well, like Cinder and Winter.

 

The Lunar Chronicles is a fabulous series for anyone who loves fairy tale retellings. Meyer’s futuristic reimagining of classic stories is inventive and the stories themselves keep readers on the edge of their seats. Now is the perfect time to get caught up on all your favorite fairy tale characters, and Fairest allows readers a way to better understand one of the series' most evil characters.

Laura

 
 

Secret Society Intrigue

Secret Society Intrigue

posted by:
March 25, 2015 - 7:00am

The Conspiracy of Us by Maggie HallThe first in a planned trilogy, The Conspiracy of Us by Maggie Hall is the start to a fast-paced thriller series that readers won’t be able to put down. When the book begins, Avery West is a fairly typical teenager, with the exception of the all-too-frequent moves she and her mom make for her mom’s job. However, when Jack Bishop shows up at her high school and asks her to prom, her whole life changes in a way she never would have expected.

 

What should be a happy moment in her school year is turned upside down when Jack reveals that her absent father's family is incredibly powerful and a part of a secret society, the Circle, that dates back to the time of Alexander the Great. Avery learns that the Circle controls many of the world’s governing bodies and has extreme power in other areas as well, which she witnesses first hand. She’s whisked away to Paris, and the Circle shuts down Prada so she can shop by herself for an afternoon. As Avery learns more about her family background and the secret society they’re a part of, she is drawn even deeper into the Circle’s lore. Meanwhile, Jack begins to realize Avery’s importance to the Circle, leading the two on a whirlwind, worldwide adventure.

 

The Conspiracy of Us is filled with mystery, suspense and romance. Maggie Hall has created a story that will delight readers looking for a new thriller. Check out Hall’s Pinterest account for a fun board of inspiration for the fashion and travel locations for the series.

Laura