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Between the Covers / Shhhh... we're reading.   Photo of reading after bedtime
Jeanne Andrews

Violent crime, serial killers, and sociopaths are the subjects for some of Jeannie Andrews' favorite fictional reading material. This fact surprises many of Jeannie's friends as her personality tends more to mirror Giselle from the Disney movie Enchanted than Jack Torrance from The Shining. She can be found at the Towson Branch where she is quick with a smile and happy to help patrons find just the right book for their mood. She is also a big fan of mysteries, historical fiction and teen novels, which provide a nice balance to the super charged, adrenaline packed thrill rides that keep her up late into the night.

 

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Bloggers

 

Haunted by the Past

Haunted by the Past

posted by:
March 18, 2013 - 7:45am

A Killer in the WindDan Champion was an undercover cop with the NYPD, on fire with ambition and with no regard for overtime caps or departmental boundaries. While combing through old case files, he discovers references to the “Fat Woman,” a mysterious, legendary monster, responsible for countless human trafficking purchases and subsequent murders. His obsession with finding her and the consequences of this personal mission are the driving force of A Killer in the Wind by Andrew Klavan.

 

A sting operation Champion has arranged to bring down the Fat Woman falls apart, resulting in the loss of his job and exile to a sheriff’s office in rural New York State. During his pursuit of the Fat Woman he took a street drug as a sleep aid, and he has since been haunted by ghosts and hallucinations. These visions raise many disturbing questions for Champion. How does he know the ghost boy’s name is Alexander? Why is the woman in his vision so familiar that he believes he could be in love with her? His life is turned upside down when a woman’s body pulled from the river turns out to be the very woman from his visions. The only words she utters before falling unconscious are “They are coming for us.”

 

Klavan is an international best-selling author, gifted in writing all things action and adventure. A Killer in the Wind is fast-moving and adrenaline-charged as the author utilizes bursts of short sentences and strategically placed repetition to create an effect that propels the story forward by matching pace with the action. This adult thriller is just a step darker than his teen series The Homelanders, the first of which has been optioned as a feature film. In both cases, he proves to be masterful at sweeping readers up in a mysterious suspense-filled novel and taking them on a wild ride to the stunning conclusion. 

 

Jeanne

 
 

There Was a Hole

There Was a Hole

posted by:
February 12, 2013 - 8:55am

FitzFitzgerald McGrath is a 15-year-old boy who lives with his mom in St. Paul, plays guitar in a band with his best friend, and has a crush on a pretty red head at school. On the surface, he appears to be an average teenage kid. However, readers soon find out that he has a turbulent, pain-riddled side to his personality, which has progressed to the breaking point. Fitz, by Mick Cochrane is a skillfully crafted novel which explores the impact and consequences of a boy who never had a father.

 

From childhood fantasies of a loving Dad who watches him from afar, to seething anger toward a man that has never been in touch, the reader easily identifies with Fitz’s anguish. Not knowing anything about his father, other than his once-a-month monetary contribution to the household, has gotten to be too much for Fitz to handle. Taking matters into his own hands, Fitz purchases a Smith & Wesson .38 Special and kidnaps his father. What follows is a day that will forever change both of their lives.

 

This bittersweet novel establishes characters the reader will completely empathize with, being in turn both hopeful and fearful regarding the story’s outcome. The steady and measured rhythm provides a perfect balance for the intensity of emotion experienced by both father and son. The climax of the story will have people holding their breath. In Fitz’s own words, “It feels like the longest day of his life. It also feels like the shortest” and there isn’t a reader who will want it to end.

Jeanne

 
 

Cold Case Conundrum

Cold Case Conundrum

posted by:
January 14, 2013 - 9:15am

The Hiding PlaceThere are some murder cases that just haunt you. Detective Stynes was new to his career in law enforcement when 4-year-old Justin Manning disappeared from a community park and was subsequently found dead several weeks later. The Hiding Place by David Bell is a multifaceted story exploring the lives and relationships of Justin’s family and their acquaintances. The title could reference the shallow grave where his body was discovered or the location where the truth to this clever puzzle resides.

 

After 25-years, there is renewed interest in the Manning case as the black man convicted of the crime is finally released from jail. Dante Rogers has always maintained his innocence and now with the case in the media spotlight, Stynes wonders if they actually arrested the correct person. Did the suspect’s race influence the police?  Was the testimony of the children playing at the park that day 100% reliable? Not for the first time, the detective commences second guessing his actions during the investigation.

 

Janet Manning and her daughter Ashleigh have recently moved back into her childhood home in Dove Point Ohio. Late one night a mysterious man appears at her door announcing he knows some secret information about Justin’s death. A few short days later her childhood friend Michael reappears after a 10 year absence. He was with her that tragic day in the park and questions her with a strong intensity about what she remembers from that day. Even Detective Stynes meets with his retired partner to ruminate if they did everything they could to find the killer. With all of the second guessing going on it is a safe bet that there is more to this story than what was initially believed. Bell has constructed a clever novel that is labyrinthine in its twists and turns, dead ends and surprises. Just when the reader thinks they have the mystery figured out … think again!

 

Jeanne

 
 

Dystopian Dynamite

Dystopian Dynamite

posted by:
November 13, 2012 - 8:31am

CrewelReaders of the dystopian fiction genre will thoroughly enjoy Gennifer Albin’s debut novel Crewel. Albin has created a world which is fascinating and imaginatively detailed, with believable characters that are both likeable and imperfect. In the novel, the inhabitants of Aras are fortunate to have The Guild oversee their civilization. This governing body of men instructs the Spinsters in fulfilling the needs of its citizenry. Only the most gifted and talented girls are selected for the elite role of Spinster, whose job is to weave together substance and time. Through this process the population can be fed, sheltered, kept safe, and everyone’s life can run smoothly. 16-year-old Adelice Lewys is an extraordinarily gifted girl who would be an obvious selection for this elite role. However, since she was a young girl, her parents have secretly been training her to be clumsy and awkward in an attempt to hide her ability from the Guild.

 

If Adelice fails to prove she can weave during “testing” she can look forward to a life just like her mother’s. She will have a prearranged marriage, a job determined for her, possibly as a secretary or a teacher, but most important to Adelice, she will be allowed to maintain contact with her family. To pass the Guild’s test means being taken away to the Western Coventry, never to see her parents or sister again and unfortunately this is just the situation she finds herself in. Events take a tragic turn when her parents try to help her escape before the official retrieval.

 

Watch out Suzanne Collins, step aside Lois Lowry, there is a new author in town that will truly captivate your fans. Crewel is fast-paced, with an intense plot, and will grip readers from page one as Adelice discovers the truth behind the perfection.

Jeanne

 
 

Is Anything More Important than Being Popular?

SpeechlessChelsea Knot is superficial and selfish, a major gossip and a snob. There is actually very little to like about the main character in Hannah Harrington’s novel, Speechless. After lying to her parents to attend a party, and blackmailing a classmate for a fake ID, she drunkenly stumbles into a room where two guys are making out. In typical Chelsea fashion, she runs to tell her best friend, but this time spreading a rumor leads to horrific ramifications and one of the boys ends up in a coma, the result of a severe beating.

 

Against the wishes of her friend, Chelsea reports the jocks responsible for this act of violence, sacrificing her status in the popular crowd by turning in their peers. After reflecting how her words have been responsible for almost getting a classmate killed, Chelsea takes a vow of silence in order to refrain from hurting anyone else. At school she finds herself ostracized and bullied by those she once considered her friends. She endures the constant ridicule and abuse with the assistance of an unlikely support system.

 

The author crafts an amazingly heartfelt story about the true meaning of friendship and how kindness and generosity can help heal. With an authentic voice, Harrington depicts the metamorphosis of a self-centered teen as she discovers how it feels to care about others. Without saying a word, Chelsea is able to forge honest relationships while learning to forgive herself. What will it take for her to start talking again? Will it result in the old Chelsea returning? Will her new friends still like her? This story is one of soul searching, personal growth, and courage. Speechless compellingly represents the advantages of being your own person.

Jeanne

 
 

This Ain’t Mayberry

This Ain’t Mayberry

posted by:
October 29, 2012 - 8:10am

A Killing in the HillsCarla is pissed. She is a petulant, angst-riddled teen stuck in a stupid boring diner, in a stupid boring small town, in stupid boring West Virginia waiting for her mom, who is late, again. Out of nowhere POP, POP, POP! The three elderly men sitting at a table near her are executed, systematically shot in the head one after another. Thus begins A Killing in the Hills by Julia Keller, the first novel by this Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist. 

 

The main character is Belfa Elkins, the prosecuting attorney for the community of Acker’s Gap, who is also Carla’s mother. Bell, as she is known by her friends, was born and raised in Acker’s Gap and is all too familiar with the difficulties and crime particular to this rural and impoverished community. After completing her law degree, she returned to her hometown to try to help with the fight against crime. Similar to its big city counterparts, drugs have taken a stronghold in the region and there has been a steady increase in violent crime and death as a result.

 

This is a cleverly-written tale with as many twists and turns as the snakelike West Virginia mountain roads. Keller, who was born and raised in West Virginia, accurately depicts the harsh realities of the unemployed who reside between played out coalmines and towns where more businesses are closed than open. The complicated relationship between Bell and her daughter is poignantly realistic they forge a prickly path through the turbulent teenage years. Carla can identify the shooter and takes it upon herself to try to help with his capture, and this keeps the suspense building to a surprising climax. The combination of the family storyline and the mystery of the killer’s motive and identity make this a captivating read. Hopefully this won’t be our last visit to Acker’s Gap.

 

Jeanne

 
 

Don't Read at Night

Don't Read at Night

posted by:
October 19, 2012 - 8:11am

The TurningJust in time for Halloween, The Turning by Francine Prose will wind up your anxiety level and tighten you in the grasp of fear. This teen novel is a retelling of the classic Henry James novella The Turn of the Screw. The setting has been updated to take place in the present day, and is told through a series of letters exchanged between a teenage boy named Jack and his girlfriend Sophie. Sophie’s father has procured a summer job for Jack, babysitting two children for a considerable wage on a remote island. The couple realizes her father’s motivation is an attempt to end their romance, but in order for Jack to attend college with Sophie in the fall he has no choice but to take the position. When he is informed that there will be no phone service, television, or internet connection available he almost changes his mind. Through their correspondence, the reader experiences Jack’s loneliness and initial misgivings as they progress to outright distress.

 

During the boat voyage to the island, some elderly passengers recount the story of a tragic drowning death of a couple attempting to elope from the island years before. They also allude to some mysterious happenings in the more recent past, painting Jack’s destination in shadowy details. On his arrival to the children’s home, feelings of dread and foreboding emanate from the creepy gothic mansion painted funeral black. It is full of confusing darkened hallways and unused or locked rooms. The children themselves are unusual, formally polite, dressed in old-fashioned attire, and frequently exchange furtive glances alluding to secret confidences.

 

Ghostly apparitions begin haunting Jack: a tall menacing man watches him through the library window; a beautiful woman stares from across a field. No one else in the household seems aware of these spirits. Sophie grows increasingly alarmed as Jack’s letters reflect how the stress of the situation is taking a toll. This is a frightening tale, which pays homage to the original, and exposes a new generation of readers to some real creepy fun.

Jeanne

 
 

While You Were Sleeping

While You Were Sleeping

posted by:
October 9, 2012 - 8:01am

Anything But OrdinaryAnything But Ordinary, by Lara Avery, is a candid, touching story of a girl who needs to create a new identity for herself while struggling to cope with how everyone close to her has moved on with their lives, while she was sleeping. Seventeen-year-old Bryce’s promising future as a high diver is tragically derailed due to an accident that occurs during her Olympic diving trial. Her family, friends, and a greater portion of her hometown turn out to support her during the diving meet. They witness as the dive goes horribly wrong and she cracks her head on the concrete platform. When Bryce awakens in the hospital she learns that she has been in a coma for five years, and everything in her life has forever changed. There is no Olympic gold medal in her future, her best friend and boyfriend have finished college and are backpacking across Europe. Her parents now have a strained and distant relationship and her younger sister acts angry at the world.

 

Tired of being kept in the hospital under observation, Bryce neglects to tell her doctors about the stabbing headaches or the shooting pains down her back. Nor does she mention the flashes of visions she periodically gets of things that occurred while she was in the coma and sometimes even of future events. Although alarmed by this, she refuses to let it impact her recovery. Readers will admire and possibly envy Bryce’s inner strength as she fights to regain her mobility, combat loneliness, and cope emotionally with the changes that have taken place in those she loves. While reclaiming her life, she assists her family in the rebuilding of their relationships. Bryce discovers her world may not be the vacuum she initially believed when she first wakes up. This is an inspirational and poignant story that will leave you wanting to cherish each and every day.

Jeanne

 
 

Death and Depravity

Death and Depravity

posted by:
September 27, 2012 - 8:45am

MonsterWanton debauchery, an all-consuming thirst for vengeance, satanic worship, madness, an undead predator-- any of these characteristics could be utilized to describe a monster. Readers encounter a plethora of individuals that qualify for this label in Dave Zeltserman’s new release Monster. In Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, the creature fashioned from different human body parts and brought to life by Victor Frankenstein is easily classified as the monster. Zeltserman’s novel is the story of the unfortunate and unwitting brain donor used in the mad doctor’s creation. Written in a style that mirrors Shelley’s original work, this is a dark and menacing tale about a tortured man trapped in the body of an abomination.

 

Friedrich Hoffman is a young man convicted of killing his betrothed a week before their marriage. After suffering an agonizing and horrendous death on the wheel, he awakens on a slab in Frankenstein’s laboratory. His intelligence and memory are intact and he quickly comes to suspect his creator’s involvement in his beloved’s death as well as his own false conviction. The black magic employed in the creature’s reanimation leave Friedrich powerless to exact revenge on his enemy. Friedrich is not the only innocent victim to be ensnared in Frankenstein’s web. Something even more sinister and disturbing is planned in an abandoned castle in a remote mountainous region south of Geneva. Friedrich’s remaining humanity is called into question as he struggles with whether to intervene or be complacent with the sordid plans of Frankenstein and the evil Marquis de Sade.

 

Monster is a gripping gothic horror tale, brilliantly told. Zeltserman is an accomplished author of mystery, horror and noir. He has earned the Shamus, Derringer and Ellery Queen's Readers' Choice awards and could very well be on track to another winner with Monster.

 

Jeanne

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A Not so Peaceful Place

A Not so Peaceful Place

posted by:
September 17, 2012 - 7:45am

Gone MissingIn the quiet and picturesque town of Painters Mill, Ohio there is a thriving Amish community. These families have strong religious beliefs and shun the use of electricity, cars, and motorized farming equipment. They lead a simple life by relying on the land, and they have minimal interaction with outsiders. One would think such a peaceful place would be unfamiliar with the darker side of human nature, but sadly one would be mistaken. Linda Castillo has created an exciting mystery series situated in this bucolic setting, which has seen a crazed serial killer targeting both Amish and English women, a horrific home invasion, and hate crimes. The disappearance of young Amish teens is the focus of her latest release Gone Missing.

 

The Painter’s Mill Sheriff’s Department, though small, has a valuable and effective tool at its disposal to assist in solving crimes that involve the Amish. Her name is Chief Kate Burkholder, and along with her experience as a big-city law enforcement officer, she also was raised Amish. The plain folk have a natural distrust of law enforcement and few people are in the position to cope with the clash of cultures and ideals as Chief Burkholder.

 

Gone Missing is the fourth Amish mystery written by Castillo, though it is not necessary to read them in chronological order. In each, she provides a concise backstory that summarizes her protagonists’ personal demons and the inner battle to keep them in check. Sworn to Silence, the first Kate Burkholder novel, is under production by the Lifetime network as a two-hour movie starring Neve Campbell, with the possibility of it becoming a regular series. Interesting, informative, and chilling, these mysteries may not represent a serene drive in the country, but they are definitely worth the trip.

 

Jeanne