Between the Covers / Shhhh... we're reading.   Photo of reading after bedtime
Elna Reggie

A Jersey Girl at heart, Elna fell in love with books starting way back when she landed a job as a shelver for the San Diego Public Library. Since then, she has navigated a quirky but rewarding life in public, academic and school libraries. She started writing creative book reviews while in library school. You can find Elna outside removing weeds from her yard, spending time with her family, looking for the best deals in travel and discussing the latest Game of Thrones to anyone who is willing.

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Elna

A Taste for Monsters

posted by: April 20, 2017 - 7:00am

Cover Art for A Taste for MonstersIf you are interested in reading a work of teen fiction, especially one that involves a Victorian tale, horror and feel good story wrapped into one, then try A Taste for Monsters by Matthew J. Kirby. Within the bustling crowded streets of late 19th century London, a killer, sometimes referred to as Leather Apron but more commonly known as Jack the Ripper, terrorized the town of Whitechapel. Caught in the middle of this chaotic situation are two unlikely characters who must find a way to solve this murder mystery or face its deadly and haunting consequences.

 

Joseph Merrick, a.k.a. The Elephant Man, is a major character, and this story provides insight into how his life may have been during this time period. The physical deformities that he developed as a child caused him to experience much hardship in life that ranged from extreme discomfort to hiding underneath a mask to avoid the often unwanted attention given to him around the streets of London. Despite this, Merrick was able to befriend a doctor named Jonathan Treves, who helped him to have a comfortable stay at the London Hospital until the end of his days. Along with these historical figures, an unexpected friendship develops between The Elephant Man and a young lady named Evelyn, who is hired to be his maid. Having worked as a matchstick girl, Evelyn contracts a disease which eats away at the jaw due to phosphorous exposure. As you can already guess, physical deformities are a prevalent theme throughout the book and the author encourages the reader to reflect on who really is the “monster” in the story.

 

A teen historical fiction, this is one that not only recreates the terror of Jack the Ripper but is also about being different and finding friendship despite the bleak circumstances. Those with an interest in this time period and subject matter may also want to try The Name of the Star by Maureen Johnson or Stalking Jack the Ripper by Kerri Maniscalco.


 
 

Outlander Kitchen

posted by: December 21, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Outlander KitchenJamie and Claire. If you easily recognized those two names, than you are wey ahead o' th' gam on this blog post. First published in 1991, the Outlander series — historical fiction that has taken its readers on the adventures of a time-traveling heroine to the Scottish Highlands during the mid-18th century — has reached the hearts, minds and now stomachs of its fans with the Outlander Kitchen: The Official Outlander Companion Cookbook by Theresa Carle-Sanders. The earthy nature of the recipes may inspire you to break convention this holiday season and create a feast that celebrates this popular story.

 

The book includes a forward by author Diana Gabaldon, who explains that it isn’t difficult to transform your 21st century kitchen into the ultimate Outlander Kitchen. As you prepare a Yuletide menu, why not make “Governor Tryon’s Potato Fritters,” a yummy pancake made up of only five simple ingredients — eggs, potato, flour, salt and onion. If you have a craving for sweets, there is the “Humble Crumble Apple Pie,” which probably speaks for itself, consisting of freshly cut apple slices within a light flaky crust. Included with each character-driven recipe is an excerpt from the book that wakes up the taste buds along with a vivid assortment of culinary photographs.

 

The Outlander series has captured the world and BCPL by storm — adapted as a television series available on DVD and also as a graphic novel. Set among the romantic backdrop of majestic hills and crags, it is easy to become spellbound with its natural beauty and rustic way of life. Traveling between two centuries and several different countries couldn’t be any easier this holiday season. Who knows, after trying out some recipes you may find yourself reciting the well-known Auld Lang Syne by Scottish poet Robert Burns. Sloch weel (eat well)!


 
 

And the Trees Crept In

posted by: November 10, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for And the Trees Crept InAnd the Trees Crept In by Dawn Kurtagich is a psychological teen thriller that captures the author’s talent for the spooky and terrifying. The sequel to The Dead House, this novel takes the reader into the depths of something very sinister, and will scare the pants off of anyone who picks up this book. At times visually poetic, Kurtagich creates a world full of mystery and proves that the true meaning of terror may exist in the darkest corners of our imagination.

 

With a knock — more like a loud bang — two sisters mysteriously arrive at the front door of an estranged relative known as “Crazy” Aunt Cathy. After years of abuse, 13-year-old Silla and 4-year-old Nori have run out of options and make a daring escape in search of a safe haven. Far away from civilization, Silla quickly realizes that there are many secrets buried within what is known as “La Baume,” and that they are very much alone and very much cursed.

 

If you don't mind a decent scare or are interested in something that isn't wrapped up with a pretty ribbon, this is for you. For those who just can’t get enough of horror and suspense, you may also want to try The Forest of Hands and Teeth, or listen to Odyssey Award-winner, Scowler.

 


 
 

The Glittering Court

posted by: October 19, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Glittering CourtIn The Glittering Court, Richelle Mead weaves a tale that transports readers from the royal palace of Osfridian to uncharted territory in the lands of Adoria. At the center of the story is Lady Whitmore, Countess of Rothford, who has a major dilemma, one that will decide her fate. Descended from a long line of royalty, at age 17 she is quickly learning the consequences of maintaining a privileged lifestyle and the obligations that come along with it.

 

Caught in a world where a woman’s greatest asset is her beauty or family name, a marriage to one of equal status may be the answer to a secure financial future. Despite the precarious situation, a timely meeting leads to a decision that charts the course of this entertaining read. Assuming the identity of another, the countess risks everything to have the freedom to make her own choices. She encounters the true meaning of friendship along the way, and also finds that following her heart comes with its own complications — especially when it comes to a particular gentleman she is unable to avoid.

 

The front cover may promise the reader an evening of “glittering” festivities, however, Lady Whitmore is not the average princess. The Glittering Court takes you on an adventure through rugged terrain as you follow the journey of a fearless heroine who discovers that life is more than ball gowns and fine dining. The first in the series, read as a stand-alone or continue on with Midnight Jewel, which is due out in early 2017.


 
 

Ivory and Bone

posted by: October 4, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Ivory and BoneNothing pulls at the heartstrings more than the first time someone meets the love of his life. It's easy to imagine stolen glances from across the room followed by romantic walks through moonlit nights. However, in the book Ivory and Bone, author Julie Eshbaugh reminds us that love is not always that easy, and that it takes a little more work to get to the “heart” of things.

 

Set during the Ice Age, we experience how life may have been for early humans who inhabited the earth. In a land filled with the harsh realities of below freezing temperatures and diminished resources, we are introduced to the story of two young characters named Pek and Mya. Told in storytelling format through the voice of Pek, it will be easy to imagine a world where wooly mammoths roamed freely and where there was a thin line between an enemy and a friend.

 

Eshbaugh delves into the heart of human connection and shows us that cooperation between even warring clans is what possibly separated the first people from other mammals. This is a great read for those who have ever wondered how our early ancestors lived over 12,000 years ago. Get ready for an unexpected love story that will not only take you by surprise but will also be a journey through a landscape of frozen tundra of the prehistoric world.


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