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Doug Beatty

Douglas Beatty grew up reading Agatha Christie, cheering for the Uncanny X-men and watching too many old black and white monster movies. This only strengthened his love for mysteries, graphic novels and horror books and keeps him ready for an impending zombie uprising. He also loves to cook, perform improvisational comedy and listen to pop music. He currently works in Mobile Library Services where he is always poised and ready to hand out another good book.

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Hair of the Dog

Hair of the Dog

posted by:
March 11, 2013 - 7:45am

The Good HouseAnn Leary introduces us to a delightful, if not slightly tragic, character in her novel The Good House. Hildy Good lives in a historic community on Boston’s North Shore, where she works as a rather successful independent real estate broker. She is the descendant of famed Massachusetts witch Sarah Good, and is often reputed to having psychic abilities.  Hildy vehemently denies this, however. The abilities she possesses lie only in her ability to read body language and facial cues, and she can often get her friends and relatives to reveal secrets best kept hidden.

  

But Hildy harbors her own secret. Recently, her daughters staged an intervention and forced her to confront her drinking. Hildy agrees to spend a month in Hazelden, if only to appease her children. But Hildy believes that drinking is hard liquor, and not the occasional bottle of wine. Hildy soon becomes adept at abstaining at social occasions, opting to secretly sip from the nectar while at home. All the while, Hildy is still working hard to sell properties and attract new clients. She becomes involved in the lives of some of the quirky residents of the town and soon secrets are revealed to her about their complicated lives. But it could be very worrisome to reveal your secrets to the town alcoholic. The Good House is an incredible novel told from Hildy’s point of view. She narrates her tale, and is a somewhat unreliable narrator because her perspective is often skewed by drink.  The audio version of the book is read by the talented actress Mary Beth Hurt, and she provides a striking voice for Hildy that makes the audio a joy to listen to. The Good House is a wonderful character study and will be enjoyed by individual readers and book groups alike.

 

Doug

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Two for the Price of One

Two for the Price of One

posted by:
February 25, 2013 - 9:01am

The Child's ChildIn the novel The Child’s Child, Ruth Rendell (writing as Barbara Vine) creates a novel within a novel that looks at two very different issues. In the present day we meet Andrew and Grace Easton, brother and sister, who are sharing a London home they call Dinmont house. Grace is working on her doctoral thesis, writing about the plight of single mothers throughout history. She has recently acquired the manuscript of a lost novel written in 1951, The Child’s Child, chronicling the story of a brother and sister in the 1920’s. In this manuscript, John is a closeted homosexual hiding an illegal relationship with a man and living in constant fear of the law. His sister Maud is fifteen and finds herself with child, only to be cast out of her home when the truth is revealed. These details coincide with many in Grace’s own life. Her brother Andrew is also homosexual and has found love with a rather handsome young man. When one of Andrew’s friends is murdered outside a London nightclub, his boyfriend begins to fall apart. What follows is an event that will change Grace’s life forever.

 

Most of The Child’s Child consists of this novel within a novel and really encapsulates life in the 1920’s for two types of minorities. A three-time Edgar Award winner, Barbara Vine is known for psychological thrillers, and her latest falls into this category. It is not an easy read, as John and Maud had a difficult life and the novel highlights some of the difficulties that people in their situations may have faced. The addition of Grace and Andrew in the present day adds a nice comparison, and there are some thrilling moments housed within their story as well. Barbara Vine continues to create memorable characters in this readable and suspenseful story.

Doug

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Web of Lives

Web of Lives

posted by:
February 11, 2013 - 9:15am

Beautiful RuinsSome reading experiences are meant to be savored. Jess Walter creates one in Beautiful Ruins, which begins in 1962 at Hotel Adequate View on the Italian coastline. Pasquale Tursi, who runs the hotel, is captivated by the blond woman who arrives at his hotel. She turns out to be a dying American actress, and thus begins a novel that sweeps over decades and contains a cast of captivating characters, all “beautiful ruins” in their own right. In the present day we meet Michael Dean, a film producer who has recently returned to favor with the popularity of a reality television show, and his long suffering assistant Claire Silver, who is in the process of discovering another line of work. Next comes Shane Wheeler who wants to make a pitch to Michael Dean with a screenplay about the Donner party. Other characters include a would-be novelist, a failed musician and a famous film actor. These lives are woven together in an unusual style that includes chapters of novels, film treatments and even a play.

 

The characters Jess Walter creates are completely realized and finely detailed. The story captures the imagination and you can’t help but care for this motley crew as they try to create something that matters, only to find themselves failing and falling and further affecting all the other lives around them.  Although the characters seem separated at the beginning of the novel, the stories begin to intertwine and blend, leading to an incredible crescendo. Thoroughly discussable, this novel is perfect for book groups. Beautiful Ruins will pull you in, capture your heart and will make you reflect on your own life choices.

Doug

 
 

Terror on Six Legs

Terror on Six Legs

posted by:
January 25, 2013 - 7:01am

The ColonyReaders who have an unreasonable fear of insects should steer clear of the science thriller The Colony by A.J. Colucci. Others who might enjoy a tale of science gone mad, featuring man-eating ants who rise up and take over Manhattan, are in for the thrill ride of the year. A disgruntled scientist heads to Central Park with an ant queen, determined to make the world pay for past wrongs. But Cleopatra is no ordinary queen.  She is a Siafu Moto. Nearly an inch longer than ordinary ants, the Siafu Moto has an exoskeleton that is highly resistant to all known pesticides. They also have poison sacs filled with neurotoxins that are meant to paralyze their prey. One bite from one ant could hardly knock down a mammal the size of a human, but human rarely encounter just one ant. They crawl up walls and drop from ceilings, surrounding their prey, stripping their flesh, and leaving an empty husk.  Something needs to be done, so a well-known entomologist with a specialty in ants is called in. But even Paul O’Keefe is baffled on how to stop this growing colony, so he sends a military helicopter to pick up some back up--his ex-wife Kendra, who is currently studying fire ants in the desert.

  

A.J. Colucci writes a tight story for readers who enjoy a creature feature. The Colony is reminiscent of a B-movie, and although the ants in this novel don’t tower over your head, they are no less deadly. The novel is fast paced, has great action sequences and is a lot of fun to read. Be forewarned: read The Colony and you’ll be scrambling away the next time you see an ant on your picnic blanket!

Doug

 
 

Justifiable Murder?

Justifiable Murder?

posted by:
January 11, 2013 - 8:45am

OutrageIn his novel Outrage, Arnaldur Indridason deals with the serious subject of rape and its deadly consequences. With Inspector Erlunder on a leave of absence, his colleague Inspector Elinborg is able to take center stage as she is called upon to solve a rather unpleasant crime. A man is found in a Reykjavik apartment with his throat cut and his mouth stuffed full of the date rape drug Rohypnol. There were signs of sexual activity in the apartment that leave Elinborg to wonder if this man was a rapist and perhaps his victim regained consciousness and attacked the attacker. There are few clues to go on, but Elinborg finds a discarded shawl under the bed with a rather familiar scent. Elinborg is an accomplished cook and cookbook writer. She realized the scents are Indian cooking spices, and is able to discern that the victim may also be a lover of this type of cuisine. Following lead after lead, Elinborg tries to discover more about the man in the apartment as well as his possible victim. Delving into the past, she must come to terms with some unpleasant truths about the man whose murder she is trying to solve.

 

Outrage reads like a standard police procedural and fans of Icelandic mysteries will thoroughly enjoy it. It is nice for Indridason to let Elinborg take lead. She is an interesting character and much is revealed about her home life and her work style. The case is complex and there are many leads to follow, keeping the reader interested and involved. This is the seventh Indridason mystery set in Reykjavik. Readers interesting in knowing what had happened to Erlunder while on leave need only to pick up his previous novel, Hypothermia.

 

Doug

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Fashion Forward

Fashion Forward

posted by:
January 10, 2013 - 8:45am

Empress of FashionEmpress of Fashion: A Life of Diana Vreeland, by Amanda Mackenzie Stuart, chronicles the life of one of the world’s most important stylemakers. Born into a wealthy family, Diana was designed for greater things. Her younger sister Alexandra was the beauty of the family, a fact that was revealed to Diana constantly by their mother, Emily. Often Diana felt unloved and unappreciated at home, and used creativity and imagination to escape her dull, drab world. She discovered an ability to surround herself with beautiful things, wonderful clothes and interesting people. In 1936, Vreeland joined the staff at Harper’s Bazaar as a fashion editor. While the editor-in-chief was concentrating on Paris couture, Vreeland concentrated on American fashion and design, often spotting new and fresh designers and photographers and pairing them together to create magic. She was able to keep the pages fresh and inviting throughout the WWII era and well into the Fifties. Times changed drastically again with the arrival of the Sixties, and Diana soon found herself at editor-in-chief of the American edition of Vogue. Here she was able to deal with rising hemlines and a youth movement that would change the world of fashion. By 1971 she was fired from Vogue, but Vreeland never stopped. She joined the staff of the Metropolitan Museum of Art as a Special Consultant to the Costume Institute, and was able to create exhibits featuring the fashion that she loved.

 

Vreeland is a fascinating character with an unusual yet powerful voice. Readers who would love to learn about fashion will find much to like in this book. Vreeland's life is captivating, as are the many stories of the designers, photographers and models of that period. It is fascinating to read how world events and the economy shape the ways people look at fashion and determine what is worn. Empress of Fashion is sure to please readers, even with the most discerning tastes.

Doug

 
 

Zombie Aftermath

Zombie Aftermath

posted by:
December 28, 2012 - 8:50am

HomeHome by Matthew Costello follows a mother and her two children as they make their way back to New York City in a hostile post-apocalyptic environment. Tragic events preceding this novel have forced Christie Murphy and her two children to flee a family vacation camp and head out into the unknown. Creatures known as Can Heads are roaming in mobs, killing and eating anything or anyone that gets in their way. Christie needs to usher her children past several small towns that could possibly have a mob mentality and try to make it to the safety of a fenced and protected highway.   They must face check points for entry, and their lack of any identification could hinder their progress. Without any active radio broadcasts, they cannot be sure that things are still the same in New York. Their home and neighborhood could have been overrun with horrible, hungry, feral cannibals. Will their home still be safe and protected or will they need to formulate a plan that could take them to another destination?

 

Readers who love a chilling, horror tale will really enjoy Costello’s writing style.  He is good at terse suspense, and his use of shorter chapters and many action sequences keep the novel fresh and exciting. He creates an interesting zombie-like villain without trying to recreate actual zombie lore, and this makes Home a thrilling read. The novel Home picks up after the events in his earlier novel, Vacation. Fans of The Walking Dead will really devour this novel.

Doug

 
 

Photos Through the Years

Photos Through the Years

posted by:
December 7, 2012 - 8:45am

Eight Girls Taking PicturesWhitney Otto has created eight memorable female photographers in her new novel Eight Girls Taking Pictures. The novel is written episodically; each character appears in a separate short story, but there is a common thread running through the entire novel. The first story features photographer Cymbeline Kelley, studying photography in the early 1900s and discovering what it means to be a female artist in her time period. Cymbeline is the glue that holds the novel together. Even after her own story is completed, she is often mentioned in the stories that follow, so the reader will learn what happens to her as she ages. Many other characters are equally fascinating and the novel spans many years during the twentieth century. Charlotte Blum, a Jewish photographer in Germany during World War II, is falling in love with another woman. Miri Marx becomes a wife and mother and moves to an apartment in New York City, contenting herself by taking pictures of Central Park from her window. Each story begins with a photograph, allowing the reader to discover how this particular photo fits into the life of the photographer. Otto covers many themes in the novel, including what it means to be a women and an artist and how to balance what is expected of you with what you hope to achieve. Because the novel spans so many years, the reader can witness the changing times but still appreciate the similarities of these different women from separate eras.

 

Readers will remember Whitney Otto from the sensational How to Make an American Quilt. Eight Girls Taking Pictures follows that similar short story style and will satisfy fans of Otto as well as attracting new readers. The photographers she writes about are fictional but are loosely based on real women photographers, and Otto provides a bibliography in case she piques a reader’s interest to learn more. Truly a wonderful novel, Eight Girls Taking Pictures will also provide lively discussions for book groups.

 

Doug

 
 

Religion, Philosophy, and Adventure

Religion, Philosophy, and Adventure

posted by:
December 3, 2012 - 8:45am

The Elephant Keepers' ChildrenPeter Hoeg has created a delightful novel with a cast of zany characters in his newest book The Elephant Keepers' Children. Fourteen-year-old Peter and his older siblings Tilte and Hans are thrust into a mystery when they are informed that their parents have mysteriously vanished. Hans manages to evade capture, but Peter and Tilte are caught and taken to Big Hill, a home for abandoned children and recovering addicts on the island of Fino. Determined to find their parents, Peter and Title plan and execute an elaborate escape, beginning an adventure that is destined to change their lives forever. They encounter several curious characters along the way, including Count Rickardt Three Lions, a recovering heroin addict and resident of  Big Hill, Leonora Ticklepalate, a nun in Fino’s Buddhist community and resident computer scientist and IT specialist, and Lars and Katinka, two police officers who are also star-crossed lovers chasing the children. Not everyone they encounter is out to help the pair. They are also being chased by a hapless bishop and her secretary, and a professor and his wife. Peter and Tilte are aware that their parents are up to something and they believe they are going to a conference in Copenhagen that will gather together great scientific minds and religious leaders of all faiths. Along the way, Peter reflects on his own brand of spiritualty and wonders what is left when you cut through the dogma.

 

Readers may remember Peter Hoeg from Smilla’s Sense of Snow but will encounter a very different novel with The Elephant Keepers' Children. Peter is an imminently likeable narrator, and the novel is full of humor, adventure, and incredibly memorable characters. There is also a philosophical undercurrent running through the novel that readers who enjoy a second layer will certainly appreciate. The tone and atmosphere are remarkably fun and there are a few great chuckles along the way.

 

Doug

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Deadly Crescendo

Deadly Crescendo

posted by:
November 9, 2012 - 8:08am

Little StarNot for faint hearts or weak stomachs, John Ajvide Lindqvist will be sure to terrify and delight horror fans with his unique brand of Scandinavian horror in Little Star.  Lennart and Laila Cedersrom were once a famous Swedish pop duo with a hit song.  As they grew older, their fame faded and they were left trapped in a disastrous marriage and with angry and bitter son. One fateful day, Lennart wandered into the woods to pick mushrooms, and he found an infant, left discarded, half buried and in a plastic bag.  He brings the infant home and gives her the moniker Little One.  Lennart has an ear for music, and soon he realizes that Little One emits the most beautiful notes. He believes she is destined to become a great singer. Afraid to call the police or social services in fear that they would take her away, Lennart and Laila keep Little One locked in the basement. They instill in her a fear of adults. She remains trapped for years, until she finally reaches adolescence.

 

In another part of Sweden we meet Theresa. As a girl, Theresa is quiet and doesn’t quite fit in socially.This becomes traumatic when she becomes older and begins to gain weight. She finds herself shunned and mocked at school, while even her one childhood friends finds a girlfriend and moves on. Theresa begins to withdraw from the world, creating online personas and trolling poetry sites. She becomes obsessed with a contestant on Sweden’s version of Idol, and is determined to meet this strange singer. When she finally meets Little One, a terrifying and dysfunctional friendship is formed. The novel examines the music industry, the effects of bullying, reality singing competitions and dysfunctional relationships and winds them together in a dark and terrifying package. Little Star is an unsettling read that will haunt readers long after they have finished the novel.

Doug

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