Between the Covers / Shhhh... we're reading.   Photo of reading after bedtime
Diane Bobo

When not escaping into a good children's book, Diane Bobo spends her time enjoying her family and friends. You'll usually find her at the park or in her backyard puttering around. She's just as likely to be relaxing on her deck as she is to be hiking in the woods. You'll find her working at the Parkville Branch.

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In the News




Starting Over

posted by: September 23, 2013 - 7:00am

Cover art for Sky JumpersForty years after World War III decimated the world’s population with its Green Bombs and catastrophically altered the Earth's landscape, a young girls leaps off a mountain without a parachute. Thus begins Sky Jumpers by Peggy Eddleman. As a result of the Green Bombs, metals formed different properties, new plants grew and electricity has been wiped out. Twelve-year-old Hope Toriella lives in a community formed in the crater of a bomb blast high in the mountains. Her small town focuses on re-inventing the lost technology of the bygone era. Her teacher shows them relics of cell phones, flashlights and cameras. New inventions range from a slotted spoon to medicines that combat new diseases. The bombs also created bands of air called the Bomb’s Breath, so dense a person will suffocate with just one inhalation. Miserably inept at inventing, Hope takes solace in the thrill of diving off a cliff through the Bomb’s Breath. The dense air slows her descent; she just has to remember to hold her breath. When word gets out that Hope’s town has medicine that combats the dreaded new Shadel’s Sickness, bandits take the town hostage until all of the medicine is turned over. To save her town, Hope and her friends must traverse dangerous terrains through the worst blizzard conditions since the war to seek help, all the while avoiding both bandits and the Bomb’s Breath.

This fast-paced adventure reads like a cross between a Wild West novel and a Mad Max movie. The author crafts an engaging, nail-biting story with strong characters and a great finish. Descriptions of the new earth are seamlessly woven into the plot, offering the reader a clear understanding of this altered world without sacrificing its storyline. Sky Jumpers is the first book in an anticipated series, with book two expected to be published in fall 2014. Young fans of science fiction and action adventure books will love Sky Jumpers.


(Release date 9/24/13)


An Example for the Kids

posted by: August 16, 2013 - 7:00am

My Happy LifeMost people count sheep to fall asleep. Dani counts happy thoughts. My Happy Life by Rose Lagercrantz tells the tale of a little girl just starting school as she deals with first day of school jitters, making friends, losing friends, getting hurt, hurting others and all the other ups and downs in the life of a child.


Dani is a wonderfully realistic character who demonstrates resilience in the face of sadness.  She is both excited and nervous about the first day of school, but she soldiers on and starts to have fun.  Quickly making a best friend in Ella, Dani is happier than ever.  Disaster strikes when Dani learns that Ella is moving away. Her sadness is heartbreaking. After a few rough days, and a few missteps, Dani slowly finds ways to be happy again.


Manageable chapters with limited text and plenty of delightful illustrations by award winning illustrator Eva Eriksson, make this book excellent for beginning readers. Through the combination of words and illustration, Lagercrantz and Eriksson perfectly capture the essence of a little girl’s life.  My Happy Life is a very sweet, honest story suitable for both independent reading and reading aloud. This charming story is refreshingly free from “cuteness” and serves as a great example for children in how to handle hard knocks.


Mutiny in the Art Box

posted by: August 5, 2013 - 3:08pm

The Day the Crayons Quit Drew DaywaldProtesting crayons? What do they have to complain about? Duncan finds out in The Day the Crayons Quit by Drew Daywalt. Duncan reaches for his crayons one day and gets a pack of protest letters instead (except from Green… Green’s pretty happy – just wants Orange and Yellow to stop fighting). Like most protestors, the colors are upset by their treatment – overuse, neglect (Where is Peach’s wrapper?), abuse and misuse. Each color details the unfairness of its life in a personal letter to Duncan. Blue doesn’t want to be the favorite, Grey is always used for the big animals, Red never gets a break and Orange and Yellow aren’t speaking!


Young readers will giggle at the silliness and enjoy learning colors. Older readers will recognize some common toddler traits in the behavior of the crayons. Readers of all ages will laugh out loud with this wonderful book about colors, creativity and compromise. Delightful, childlike illustrations by Oliver Jeffers enhance the story. How will Duncan get the crayons back to work? (And what color SHOULD the Sun be?) Find out in The Day the Crayons Quit.


Locked in the Library

posted by: July 10, 2013 - 7:44am

Escape from Mr. Lemoncello's LibraryEscape from Mr. Lemoncello’s Library is a delightful treat for readers of all ages. This fast-paced, quirky puzzler by Chris Grabenstein is nothing but fun. Kyle Keeley is a 12-year-old boy used to the challenge of competing with his two older brothers. Friendly and popular, if not the most studious of students, Kyle is discouraged to realize that the essay contest he blew off will be judged by his hero, billionaire game designer, Luigi Lemoncello. Mr. Lemoncello has funded the building of a brand new, state-of-the-art, top-of-the-line, newer-than-new library for the town, which has not had one for twelve years. The winners of the essay contest will be the first to get their new library cards and will win a lock-in (a sleepover in the library) as well as a $500 gift certificate to Mr. Lemoncello’s store. Using a little bit of creativity and initiative, Kyle submits an improved entry and is one of twelve lucky 12-year-olds to win the prize. 


The action really starts when it is announced that those who wish to, may stay for another night and participate in a scavenger hunt to escape from the library. Using clues, holographic librarians, emergency help from the outside and all their wits, the young contestants work together, and against each other, to find the exit. Escape from Mr. Lemoncello’s Library lightly touches on themes of responsibility, teamwork and bullying, without getting preachy. It also showcases the increasing popularity of libraries as more than just a book repository.  Mr. Lemoncellos’s library has a board game room, a café and an Electronic Learning Center with 12 plasma televisions hooked into a catalog of educational video games. Fans of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory or The Gollywhopper Games will love this book.


Of Gods and Boys (and Girls)

posted by: May 29, 2013 - 8:01am

Hades and the Helm of DarknessAthena the BrainThe underworld stinks! Ten year-old Hades is on a quest through the smelly underworld with his companions, Zeus and Poseidon; fighting Titans, dodging monsters and avoiding licks from a three-headed dragon dog. Hades seems to like it there, though. It smells great to him and the groan-inducing jokes of the ferryman, Captain Charon, crack him up. Hades and the Helm of Darkness, by Joan Holub and Suzanne Williams, is a lighthearted, fun read and a great introduction to the Greek myths. The third in the Heroes in Training series, Hades and the Helm of Darkness continues the saga of the Olympians' rise to power which began with Zeus and the Thunderbolt of Lightning and continued with Poseidon and the Sea of Fury. Following the fuzzy prophecies of the Oracle of Delphi, who, unfortunately, has foggy eyeglasses, the heroes in training must find and use their powers in order to save the world from the Titans. Next up in the series will be Hyperion and the Great Balls of Fire.


Holub and Williams also co-author the Goddess Girls series. These books send the Greek goddesses to an ancient middle school with Zeus as the principal. The classic myths are retold in a middle school setting complete with teenage drama and angst. Start with Athena the Brain. Twelve-year-old Athena finds out she is the daughter of Zeus and is summoned to Mount Olympus Academy, where she comes up against mean girl Medusa (and manipulates some mortals as a class assignment). The eleventh book in the series, Persephone the Daring, is due out in August. Fans of the Monster High and Dork Diaries series are likely to enjoy Goddess Girls.


To Infinity and Beyond!

posted by: April 24, 2013 - 7:57am

Pluto's SecretPluto’s Secret, an Icy World’s Tale of Discovery by Margaret A. Weitekamp with David DeVorkin lets the cat out of the bag. Dancing around with its moon and other small worlds on the outer edges of the solar system, it watches as the people on Earth try to figure it out. Discovered in 1930 after years of searching, astronomers thought they had found the ninth planet around the sun. Pluto plays in its orbit, laughing at the astronomers. As more powerful telescopes are developed, scientists realize that Pluto is not only different than the other planets; it’s also not alone in its orbit. In 2006, this discovery led astronomers to vote on a definition of a planet, something which had never been done before. Pluto’s secret is revealed. It is not a planet, but the "first example of something new" --and it’s not the only one. Scientists have discovered an entire band of icy worlds around the sun (called the Kuiper Belt), as well as around other stars. As technology evolves, so does our ability to learn more about the Universe. 


This children’s book, put out in association with the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, does an extraordinary job of piquing the reader’s interest in the solar system. Children will enjoy learning that an 11-year-old girl suggested the name for Pluto. Coupled with Diane Kidd’s charming illustrations, the story will entertain readers of all ages. Facts and photographs follow the story and gives those interested more resources. In 2006 NASA launched the New Horizons spacecraft to conduct a flyby study of Pluto and its moon, Charon. It’s halfway there, and should reach Pluto in 2015. Follow its progress here!   


Critters and Clumsies

posted by: April 10, 2013 - 8:05am

Amy and the Missing PuppyAll About EllieIn a BlinkThe Critter Club is a newly published series for the brand new First Chapter book reader.  The first in the series, Amy and the Missing Puppy, by Callie Barkley, introduces four friends (Amy, Ellie, Liz and Marion) at their weekly sleepover party just before spring break. While her three friends have cool plans over the vacation week, Amy is left to hang out in her mother’s animal clinic reading Nancy Drew books. When a neighbor’s puppy goes missing, Amy gets inspiration from the classic girl sleuth she's reading and investigates on her own. Luckily, her three friends’ plans are altered so they can assist Amy with her case. Barkley uses simple yet descriptive language to engage the reader and make the story interesting, but not too complicated. With adorable illustrations by Marsha Riti and big, simple text, (as well as charming stories about friendship and animals), The Critter Club series is a great starter series for the young reader. Ellie’s story is next in All About Ellie.


Introducing a new line of fairy books told from the human side!  Disney’s Never Girls series transports four girls to Pixie Hollow. In certain circumstances, when Never Land gets too close to our world and at just the right time, "Clumsies" (as the fairies like to call humans) can visit Never Land. In a Blink, by Kiki Thorpe, is the first title in the series. Kate, Lainey and Mia are playing soccer in the backyard, when a blink-talent fairy pops into the garden. Mia’s little sister Gabby still believes in fairies, so when Prilla blinks in front of her, Gabby catches hold and all four girls are plopped into Pixie Hollow. The girls meet Tinker Bell and the other Disney fairies as they enlist their help to get back home. Fans of the Disney Fairies series will love this extension of the series, and it’s perfect for readers who devoured Daisy Meadows’ Rainbow Magic fairy books.



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