Between the Covers / Shhhh... we're reading.   Photo of reading after bedtime
Diane Bobo

When not escaping into a good children's book, Diane Bobo spends her time enjoying her family and friends. You'll usually find her at the park or in her backyard puttering around. She's just as likely to be relaxing on her deck as she is to be hiking in the woods. You'll find her working at the Parkville Branch.

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Game On!

posted by: January 13, 2014 - 7:55am

Cover art for Game OnThe son of two famous stage magicians, Max Flash is himself a great escape artist, contortionist and illusionist.  These very qualities prompt his parents’ true employer, the Department for Extraordinary Activity (DFEA) to recruit him for a special assignment. In Game On, Max’s first mission is to close the portal between the video game world (Virtuals’ world) and the real world (Gamers’ world) before the Virtuals take over.  With the use of a special USB gadget, Max is thrust into the Virtual world via a computer hard drive. His task is to locate the escaped Virtual, Deezil, and close the portal between the two worlds. As he travels from game to game looking for the portal and the evil Deezil, Max must avoid race cars, battle centurions and flee farmers in his quest to save the Gamer world. Relying only on his own cunning and special skills (and some nifty gadgets from the DFEA), Max defies death and suppresses the Virtual uprising before returning home.


The first in the Max Flash series by Jonny Zucker, Game On is a fast paced adventure and the start of a fabulous series for young readers. Max’s further missions will have him battling aliens in space, robots in a parallel universe, an Egyptian curse, and mysterious beings in the Antarctic. With original stories, a likable hero and short, action-filled chapters, Max Flash is an all-around great read. Fans of the television series Phineas and Ferb will enjoy this series for its quirky storylines and action-packed heroic adventures.


Art for Art’s Sake

posted by: December 23, 2013 - 6:00am

Cover art for Meeting CezanneA boy’s first summer of independence and puppy love is described in the charming novelette, Meeting Cézanne, by Michael Morpurgo. Set in 1960’s Provence, France, Meeting Cézanne tells the story of 10-year-old Yannick’s summer infatuation with Provence, his cousin, and the artist Paul Cézanne. When an unfortunate misunderstanding leads to Yannick destroying a drawing by the “most famous painter in the world,” Yannick tries to repair the damage by asking Monsieur Cézanne for a new one.


Paired with colorful illustrations by Francois Place, themselves reminiscent of Cézanne’s work, this re-release of Morpurgo’s short story is a wonderful book for the elementary school set. Morpurgo’s first person prose will resonate with young readers. Yannick’s yearning for his cousin to like him, his desire to fix his error and his confusion over the famous artist are realistic and relatable. Morpurgo is the award-winning author of many children’s books, including War Horse which was made into a movie directed by Steven Spielberg. He was also named Children’s Laureate in the United Kingdom from 2003-2005.


Besides being a great read, Meeting Cézanne is sure to pique an interest in painters for the reader. 13 Painters Children Should Know by Florian Heine is a great introduction to the many various painting styles of the great artists. Heine provides a brief biography of each artist as well as a detailed description of what makes each special. Additionally, Just Behave, Pablo Picasso! by Jonah Winter is a delightful picture book describing the ups and downs of Picasso’s art career. Beautifully illustrated with artwork by Kevin Hawkes, Just Behave, Pablo Picasso! is a quick and easy foray into the world of Picasso.



Without a Trace

posted by: November 22, 2013 - 6:00am

Cover art for The SnatchabookCover art for Daisy Gets LostMissing books and a missing dog are the focus of two fabulous new picture books.


What is happening to all of the stories in Burrow Down? In The Snatchabook by Helen Docherty and Thomas Docherty, a mysterious creature called the Snatchabook has come to town. This adorable, sad little flying animal has no one to read to him at bedtime. His solution? Steal the books to read by himself. He mends his ways after Eliza the bunny catches him and all of the little animal creatures of Burrow Down let the Snatchabook listen to their bedtime stories. Told in a catchy rhyme with bright colorful illustrations, this celebration of the bedtime story is a true delight and is itself a perfect read-aloud for bedtime.


In Daisy Gets Lost by Chris Raschka, Daisy the dog is playing fetch when she is distracted by a squirrel. After a fun game of chase with said squirrel, she looks up and realizes she is lost! Raschka’s amazing watercolor illustrations display the worry and fear in both Daisy and her girl. He perfectly captures their complete joy when, after frantically searching for each other, they are finally reunited. Even the squirrel seems content at the end. Daisy was first introduced to readers in A Ball for Daisy, for which Raschka won the Caldecott Medal. Daisy Gets Lost is a worthy sequel and a treat on its own.


Noodlekugel Nuttiness

posted by: November 6, 2013 - 6:00am

Mrs. Noodlekugel and Four Blind MiceNick and Maxine are off on another adventure with their babysitter in Mrs. Noodlekugel and Four Blind Mice by Daniel Pinkwater. In this delightful sequel to Mrs. Noodlekugel, the four mice friends make a terrible mess at tea-time, causing Mrs. Noodlekugel to realize that it is time to have them checked by an eye doctor. Nick and Maxine keep Mrs. Noodlekugel and Mr. Fuzzface, her talking cat, company on the bus trip to the oculist’s office. It is a story loaded with whimsy (talking cats), eccentricities (the mice can’t talk, but they do need glasses), and a little bit of mystery. The absurdity of a monkey waiter, mice riding on hats and eye doctors who treat mice will make the reader giggle. An unexpected family reunion ties the story together and provides a neat conclusion.


The charming narrative is broken up into easy-to-manage chapters with large print, making this series a perfect choice for the new chapter book reader.  Engaging illustrations by Adam Stower add to the overall appeal. Reminiscent of the Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle books, but without the character building lessons, the Mrs. Noodlekugel series is pure fun.


Imagination Run Wild

posted by: October 15, 2013 - 7:00am

The Sasquatch EscapeThe Lonely Lake MonsterWhere would you take an injured baby dragon? To the imaginary veterinary if you are lucky enough to have one in town. The Sasquatch Escape is the first book in the Imaginary Veterinary series by Suzanne Selfors. In it, two 10-year-olds, Ben and Pearl, find themselves living in what could be the most boring town in the world, Buttonville. The Button factory has long been closed down when Ben moves in with his grandfather while his parents work out some “issues.”  Pearl has lived there her whole life and is well-known as a troublemaker…so much so that she has been banned from the bookstore and other children are not allowed to play with her! When Ben’s cat catches a baby dragon, Ben and Pearl take the dragon to the only animal doctor in town, Dr. Woo of Dr. Woo’s Worm Hospital, located inside the old button factory. All is not as it seems at the Worm Hospital, as the children discover when a Sasquatch is let loose on the town!   


Book two in the series, The Lonely Lake Monster, continues Ben and Pearl’s adventures as apprentices at the Worm Hospital. Tasked with trimming the Sasquatch’s toenails on the first day, they quickly become distracted by an enormous lake monster and a leprechaun with a head cold. When the lonely lake monster catches Ben for a pet, it is up to Pearl to save him (ideally without being caught breaking the rules, again!)


The Imaginary Veterinary series is filled with delightful characters from both the real world and the imaginary world. Underlying themes of loyalty and resilience add to the rich plotline. Selfors alternates points of view for each book, with book one being told from Ben’s point of view, and book two being told from Pearl’s. She adds some enrichment activities to the end of each book challenging the reader to use their imaginations with some writing, art and science activities.  She also adds some background to the mythical creatures described in each book.  This is an excellent adventure series for children who enjoy a little bit of fantasy. The third book, The Rain Dragon Rescue, is due out in January 2014.



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