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Christine

But Enough About Me

posted by: January 7, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for But Enough About MeBut Enough About Me: A Memoir is Burt Reynolds' no-holds-barred account of the people he has known throughout his life, including childhood friends, mentors and, of course, Hollywood celebrities. Sharing both his viewpoint and notable stories, you learn as much about those he has come in contact with as the man himself.

 

Told mostly in chronological order, Reynolds begins with his childhood in Rivera Beach, Florida, just south of Palm Beach. He then moves on to his time as a football player for the Florida Seminoles, with the remainder of the book focused on his career as a Hollywood stuntman and actor. Stories about the movie Deliverance, Gore Vidal and Johnny Carson are mesmerizing.  You will savor his thoughts on Bette Davis, Paul Newman and Clint Eastwood. And you will feel his strong sense of regret as he discusses his relationships with Dinah Shore and Sally Field. Sparing no details, he also shares the embarrassing aftermath of posing nude for Cosmopolitan magazine, and the hesitation he had about working in the movie Boogie Nights, the role for which he received a Best Supporting Actor Oscar nod.

 

If you are a fan of Reynolds or just like Hollywood stories, you'll enjoy this memoir. You'll smile, laugh and at times shake your head in disbelief! Reynolds delivers an entertaining yet honest portrait of himself and those he has known over the years. Humorous and even embarrassing, this book is definitely worth the read!

 

Readers who like this book may also want to check out Make ‘Em Laugh: Short-Term Memories of Longtime Friends by Debbie Reynolds or Judy & Liza & Robert & Freddie & David & Sue & Me: A Memoir by Stevie Phillips.


 
 

Almost Interesting

posted by: January 4, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Almost InterestingIs David Spade’s memoir Almost Interesting? No way, I say! It's actually extremely interesting. Filled with hilarious childhood stories, Saturday Night Live anecdotes and embarrassing tales of life in Hollywood, it's both entertaining and quick to read. He serves up his life story, warts and all!
 

Told chronologically, he takes us on wild ride through his childhood in Arizona, to his days as a struggling L.A. comic, followed by his tenure at SNL and ends with his life as a Hollywood celebrity. Uncontrollable laughter will overtake you as you read his account of pledging a fraternity, losing his newly purchased car in Hollywood and being catfished by a model’s parody account. Seriously, that happened, and quite recently, too! Even the story of his crazed assistant Skippy attacking him is hilarious. You'll also enjoy his tales of working on SNL. He candidly offers up both his favorite and least favorite hosts and musical guests. Trust me, he goes there! My favorite is his account of the infamous Sinead O’Connor performance. Finally, you will feel his overwhelming sense of loss when he discusses his best friend, Chris Farley.
 

If you’re a fan or just like to read about celebrities, I encourage you to get your hands on a copy of Almost Interesting. I’m not kidding. Do it! You can read it in quick bursts or in one long sitting, but since Spade is a comedian be prepared to laugh out loud, and even more so if you listen to the audiobook, since he narrates it. Be forewarned though, at times he is raunchy, but nothing wildly inappropriate. To see Spade in action on SNL, check out the DVD Saturday Night Live: The Best of David Spade. Knowing the backstories makes it much funnier.
 


 
 

After Alice

posted by: December 21, 2015 - 7:00am

After AliceDid you ever wonder if anyone else went down the rabbit hole like Alice did 150 years ago? Was anyone looking for her on that summer day? If so, your next must read has to be After Alice by Gregory Maguire, the story of another girl’s journey through Wonderland and the subsequent search for her and Alice above ground.
 

Told in two parts, Maguire first introduces us to Ada, Alice’s friend who is mentioned briefly at the beginning of Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland. She is the opposite of Alice. Stricken with severe scoliosis, she walks with a limp, has poor color and is not fanciful in the least. While looking for Alice along the riverbank, she comes upon the strange rabbit hole and down she goes! Just steps behind Alice, Ada encounters many of the curious characters familiar to us all – definitely a highlight for us readers! But will she find Alice in this strange underworld where everything is not as it seems? Will she make it home safely? Meanwhile, above ground, two people are searching for Alice and Ada that day: Lydia, Alice’s 15-year-old sister, and Miss Armstrong, Ada’s governess. The second part of the story deals mainly with their adventures. Their search leads us through the town of Oxford, the University and to both Alice’s and Ada’s homes. Mirroring the journey through Wonderland, they encounter many curious characters including Charles Darwin and Siam, a former slave who escaped via the Underground Railroad.
 

Take the time to get to know Ada, Lydia and Miss Armstrong. Join them on that summer’s day in Oxford. You will come away with a newfound understanding and love for Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland. You may also want to read (or reread) it. Trust me, it gets better each time! Other novels by Maguire worth a look are Wicked: Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West and Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister, my personal favorite! I also suggest checking out Gregory Maguire’s October 25th interview with NPR, which is both entertaining and insightful.


 
 

The Lake House

posted by: November 19, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Lake HouseCancel all your plans, grab a blanket, a glass of wine and get comfy! Kate Morton’s latest novel The Lake House has been released. Featuring an abandoned house, an unsolved child’s disappearance and family intrigue galore, you will joyfully be reading late into the night, during meals and anytime you have a spare moment.

 

During the 1933 Midsummer Eve’s Party, 11-month-old Theo Edevane disappears without a trace from his ancestral home in Cornwall, England. Flash forward 70 years. Sadie Sparrow, disgraced police detective spending her mandatory leave in Cornwall, discovers the Edevane family estate. The house is located deep in the woods surrounded by ponds, trickling streams and idyllic gardens, like those described in fairy tales. But this is no fairy tale. Sparrow finds the house to have been abandoned. A saucer is on the table waiting for tea. Books are left open waiting for someone to read. It as if the family just left and locked the doors, never to return. What happened to Theo that fateful night in 1933? Why is the house abandoned? To get answers, Sparrow tracks down famed mystery author Alice Edevane, who was only 16 when her brother disappeared. What does Alice know about the events of that evening? Does she know more than she told police? Will she help Sadie solve her brother’s disappearance?

 

Told from each family member’s perspective, continuously shifting from the past to the present, Morton weaves an engaging tale of mystery, with layer upon layer of intrigue. A page-turner with an amazing ending, you will not be sorry you spent the time learning the mysteries of The Lake House. For more great reads by Morton, try The Secret Keeper and The House at Riverton. Just as good, I promise!


 
 

Food Whore: A Novel of Dining and Deceit

posted by: November 3, 2015 - 6:00am

Cover art for Food WhoreFood whore: a person willing to do anything for food.
 

In her debut novel, Food Whore: A Novel of Dining and Deceit, Jessica Tom tells the mesmerizing tale of one such food whore, Tia Monroe. An aspiring food writer, Tia believes she can ascend to the top of New York’s cutthroat food world, where being the next big thing is achieved at any cost.  
 

Tia hopes to begin her ascension by securing an internship with famed cookbook writer, Helen Lansky. But fate has a different plan. She crosses paths with Michael Saltz, the anonymous and powerful New York Times food critic who has a big secret. He has lost his sense of taste. He convinces Tia to ghostwrite his reviews and, in return, she is provided with designer clothes, access to four-star restaurants and the coveted internship with Lansky. But no one can know of their partnership. She believes this is a small price to pay to achieve her dream.  After all, she will be working in the exclusive world of four-star restaurants and celebrity chefs, making unbelievable connections. Any grad student would kill for such unprecedented access. But Tia soon realizes that real connections are difficult to make when you have a secret. Will she keep her integrity while achieving her dream? Or, like so many before her, will she become just another casualty of the New York dining scene?
 

If you like both deception and true-to-life characters, Food Whore will keep you hooked to the very end. Clearly, dining and deceit do make great fiction.
 

For a true, no-holds-barred, hilarious account of New York’s restaurant world, try Anthony Bourdain’s memoir, Kitchen Confidential.
 


 
 

Pretty Girls

posted by: October 21, 2015 - 7:00am

Pretty Girls by Karin Slaughter coverDo bad things happen to pretty girls? Yes, they do according to Karin Slaughter’s latest novel, Pretty Girls. A gripping, fast-paced, intense thriller that keeps you on the edge of your seat. From the first page she grabs you by the throat and does not let go until the very last word.

 

Pretty Girls begins with Claire Scott witnessing her husband Paul’s brutal murder. Paul was her provider, lover, soulmate and family for 20 years. She even disowned her sister, Lydia, when she accused him of attempted rape. She trusted Paul implicitly, while Lydia was a thieving alcoholic and drug addict. But how well did she really know him. Yes, he was by her side when her father committed suicide and endlessly filled the hole in her heart from her eldest sister’s disappearance. But now, 20 years later, another pretty girl has gone missing in their town and Paul has been murdered. Are these two events connected? Was Lydia telling the truth? As she moves forward from his death, Claire learns that Paul had secrets. But how deep are those secrets and how do they affect her and her sister Lydia? Who can she trust to help her find the truth? Masterfully told through both Claire and Lydia’s voices with excerpts from their father’s journal before his suicide, Slaughter weaves a tale of both deception and shock.

 

Filled with plenty of “aha!” moments only to be followed with “but what about…?” moments, Slaughter keeps you guessing to the very end. As you learn more about Paul Scott with each page, discovering the truth will become your mission as much as Claire’s. So much so that you may even suffer a sleepless night or two, but you will not regret it!

 

Looking for other twisting tales of deception like Pretty Girls? Try The Good Girl by Mary Kubica and Luckiest Girl Alive by Jessica Knoll.

 


 
 

Kitchens of the Great Midwest

posted by: October 8, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Kitchens of the Great MidwestWhat happens when quirky characters, unique structure and recipes are combined? You get J. Ryan Stradal’s debut novel, Kitchens of the Great Midwest. No, it’s not a coffee table book filled with staged photos of luxury Midwest kitchens; rather, it’s the compelling tale of misfit Midwesterner Eva Thorvald, a girl with a “once in a generation palate” who overcomes a tragic childhood to become a nationally renowned top reservationist chef.

Is this a great rags to riches story? Definitely! But it’s Stradal’s uncommon structure that makes this novel outstanding. Nine offbeat Midwesterners in nine separate chapters tell their respective stories. Outcasts in their own lives, each one is connected to Eva. This is a winning move by Stradel. Not only are we presented with Eva’s viewpoint, but we also see how she’s perceived by others and how their actions propelled Eva forward in her career. Eva only speaks to the reader as a middle schooler with a talent for both growing and using habaneros as a weapon. We learn of her early childhood through her father Lars, a good chef but socially awkward man with a passionate hatred for Lutefisk. We discover how she decided to pursue “theme” dinners from Octavia, a twentysomething wife cheating on her husband. Each character is both believable and flawed. They will make you laugh, cringe and reflect, but more importantly, care. You will want to know what happens to them and to Eva. And, as an added bonus, real Midwestern recipes from actual North Dakota Lutheran church members are scattered throughout the story. You may even want to try a few.

 

If you have been searching for an enjoyable, mind-fulfilling read that you do not want to end, you must read Kitchens of the Great Midwest. And like a favorite meal, be prepared to devour it. It is that good!


 
 

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