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Librarians

Road Trip Reads

Road Trip Reads

posted by:
May 30, 2012 - 5:11am

At the BoardwalkDini DinosaurBaby Come AwayTake these three new titles with you on your next family trip! Enjoy your vacation and keep everyone occupied with these colorful picture books all in rhyme.

 

Salt water, sand, games, rides, and summer treats--what could be better than a day at the beach? Kids and families will look through At the Boardwalk by Kelly Ramsdell again and again. A snapshot of a summer’s day on the boards, these lively, colorful, and very detailed cartoon-style pencil drawings, by illustrator Monica Armino, depict a myriad of memories and familiar, happy scenes, with different people of all ages. Simply worded in a rhyming style, you can almost hear the carousel and taste the cotton candy!

 

Dini Dinosaur, by Karen Beaumont and illustrated by Daniel Roode, is the perfect companion for downtime or a rainy day, and makes bath time and bedtime for toddlers much more fun! After a long day of play, Dini needs a little help with his bath and washing behind his horns. Playful, rhyming repetition will delight kids as little Dini starts his bath will all his dirty clothes on and finally ends up in the dinosaur buff, all squeaky clean. Bright, graphic illustrations show Dini after a whole day of messy play, and after coming clean, give him a sweet, sleepy send-off to little dinosaur dreams.

 

A bird, a cat, a fish, and a dog each imagine their perfect day with baby in Baby, Come Away, by Victoria Adler. Baby and his friends share a cup of tea in a tip-top tree, a sneak to the creek with pitter-patter feet, a romp and a roll in a puddle-filled hole, and more, until bed time comes with a kiss good night and baby can dream, dream, dream to his heart’s delight. Gentle, pastel illustrations by David Walker show adorable images of a fanciful day of play, and the sweet rhymes are a happy way to lull baby off to sleep.

Andrea

 
 

Happy 20th Anniversary, Junie B. Jones!

Junie B. Jones and the Stupid Smelly BusJunie B. First Grader: Turkeys We Have Loved and EatenTwenty years ago, Random House approached 3 of their established authors to begin a new line of books for new readers who were just starting to read chapter books.  Those authors were Barbara Park, Mary Pope Osborne, and Louis Sachar. The series that the authors created were Junie B. Jones, The Magic Tree House, and Marvin Redpost, all of which are now standards for young readers and have sold millions of copies. 

 

In the beginning, Park had reservations about writing for 6-9 year olds, but she decided to give it a shot and began work on the Junie B. Jones series. Park says, “Within the first four sentences, I discovered I had a character who hated her middle name. By the second page, I knew she was a wild child, who – big surprise – had not yet mastered the Queen’s English. And when I finally finished the book, I thought maybe I could write one or two more. I was a little low with my expectations, apparently.” Her expectations were definitely too low. There are now 29 books in the Junie B. Jones series, and more than 52 million copies in print! 

 

To celebrate 20 years of Junie B. Jones, Random House has published a special edition of the first novel in the series, Junie B. Jones and the Stupid Smelly Bus. This commemorative edition has some great extras including full-color illustrations and an interview of the author conducted by none other than Junie B. Also, look for Junie B.’s next big adventure Junie B., First Grader: Turkeys We Have Loved and Eaten (and Other Thankful Stuff), a Thanksgiving-themed book due out this August!

Beth

 
 

No Sparkly Vampires Here

No Sparkly Vampires Here

posted by:
May 29, 2012 - 8:44am

The HuntRemember when vampires were the bad guys…not the dazzling creatures you fell in love with? In The Hunt, vampires live openly, while the last few remaining humans must either literally hide -- or hide their true nature -- in order to survive. Gene is one of these humans, the only one at his high school. He has perfected the art of blending in with the undead.  He makes no sudden movements.  He does not touch anyone or laugh out loud. He shaves all of his body hair every day. Though he is athletic, the only sport he participates in is swimming (real vampires don’t sweat). He sits close to the front so he can see in the dim nighttime light. He never has a girlfriend. All of these tricks have helped him survive so far.

 

One night, The Ruler announces that there will be a hunt, sponsored by the government, for the last remaining humans and a few “lucky” citizens will be chosen to participate.  Gene’s number is pulled, and he is forced to leave the safety of his home and prepare for this great honor along with six other vampires.  As he struggles to survive the training, he discovers that he is not the only one keeping secrets, and being human is not at all what he thought. 

  

Andrew Fukuda’s writing captures the isolation and even terror of being an outsider in an otherwise homogenous community.  His first novel, The Crossing, was an ALA Booklist Editor’s Choice. The Hunt is the first in a new series and was dubbed “unputdownable” by Becca Fitzpatrick (Hush, Hush).  Fans of “old school” vampire fiction will celebrate this fast-paced yet character-driven story.

Sam

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A Voice for His Generation

A Voice for His Generation

posted by:
May 29, 2012 - 6:01am

PulpheadAs a contributor to many publications such as GQ, Harper’s, and The New York Times Magazine, John Jeremiah Sullivan, Southern editor for The Paris Review, is an accomplished essayist. His collection, Pulphead: Essays, brings together fourteen of his best long-form works from the past decade. Sullivan writes on intriguing topics, including a visit to a large, annual Christian rock festival in Kentucky. There he meets a group of young men from West Virginia who he connects with and learns their varied motivations for being there. A strong sense of place and emotion is stirred when he places himself among the throngs of believers, many of whom come to this event year after year. A supporting “character” is the RV that Sullivan rents to attend the occasion; he explores the benefits and foibles of having such a vehicle there.

 

A more personal essay describes Sullivan’s experience after his brother Worth is electrocuted in a bizarre accident, and the resulting aftermath of the coma that follows. As in many of the essays, humor worms its way into otherwise sobering events, such as recounting how many details of this incident were remembered because it had appeared on reality show Rescue 911, hosted by William Shatner. Perhaps the most fascinating of his subjects is Mister Lytle, the last of a scholarly group known as the “Twelve Southerners”. Sullivan spends some months living with the 92-year-old man, and the experiences that they share are captivating. A window into the Old South that still existed not too very long ago is opened and strikingly examined.

 

Other topics include the Gulf Coast of Mississippi just days just after Hurricane Katrina; the experiences of reality show characters after "their" season has passed; and one essay each on Michael Jackson and Axl Rose. John Jeremiah Sullivan is a writer who captures the longing, introspection, and world-weariness that exemplify the feelings of his Gen X contemporaries.

Todd

categories:

 
 

A Ride in the Blistering Sun

A Lady Cyclist's Guide to KashgarArdent convictions entwined with bewitching messages of faith can be a stormy mix, especially when boundaries blur and cultures clash. Two British sisters face this predicament. Their efforts to help establish a Christian mission in rural China extract a high price in Suzanne Joinson's impressive, multi-layered debut novel, A Lady Cyclist's Guide to Kashgar.  

 

The story begins in 1923 in the ancient Silk Road city of Kashgar, where new missionaries Lizzie and Eva English join their aloof, determined leader, Millicent Frost. While Lizzie appears passionate, Eva is suspicious of religious conversion and is basically along for the ride, literally. Traveling with her trusty BSA lady's roadster bicycle, Eva hopes to publish her guidebook, A Lady Cyclist's Guide to Kashgar. Meanwhile, another story unfolds in present day London. Frieda Blakeman is feeling alone and dislocated in her life when she meets a homeless man from Yemen who appears one day sleeping outside her door. Their eventual friendship leads the pair to an abandoned flat Frieda has inherited and to a minefield of family history. 

 

Joinson's alternating narrative style sets the stage for what is to come. The parallel storylines share symbolism and metaphors that link together the characters' connection to their world and the ability to escape that connection. It is no coincidence that birds feature prominently in both stories as a symbolic "sense of freedom" or that Eva's bicycle is a "shield and my method of escape."     

 

Drawing on her considerable travel experiences, Joinson transports her readers to an exotic locale, rich with authentic voices and evocative prose. Readers of Barbara Kingsolver (The Poisonwood Bible) and Paul Theroux (The Great Railway Bazaar) may enjoy this tale of the traditions and challenges of a world at large.

Cynthia

 
 

The World’s Greatest Crime Fiction Writer?

TakenAccording to The Huffington Post, it’s Robert Crais. You can judge for yourself with Taken, the most recent in his Joe Pike/Elvis Cole series. Taken features a multinational cast of bad guys who buy, sell, and steal one another's kidnapped victims. When professional kidnappers capture a college-age couple who venture into the desert south of Palm Springs near the Mexican border, the young woman's mother hires Cole to find them. Initially, Mom thinks it’s a hoax to get at her money, but Cole quickly realizes that it’s for real and the danger is serious.

 

Through a series of undercover efforts, Cole, Pike, and their sidekick Jon Stone begin to unravel the power balance controlling this web of cartels. As they move to infiltrate the smugglers’ group, Cole himself becomes a kidnap victim. Pike and Stone must find a way to use his capture to aid their investigation and bring justice to the victims. This quickly moving story and realistically sharp dialog will keep readers up past their bedtime. Fans of Crais as well as general mystery readers will enjoy this latest effort. For series newcomers, it is not critical to start with the first title. Crais himself even recommends starting with a title in the middle of the series: L.A. Requiem. The good news is once you’ve polished this one off, there are 14 others waiting in the stacks.

 

While the titles in this series would make a fabulous fit for the big screen, to date Crais refuses to sell the rights to Cole, Pike, and his other recurring characters, preferring to allow his readers to keep their own personal conceptions of the characters.

Maureen

 
 

Indian Nation

Rez LifeRez Life: An Indian’s Journey Through Reservation by David Treuer is part memoir, part history, and part cultural study of Indian reservations. There are approximately 310 Indian reservations in the United States today; Treuer says reservations are as “American as apple pie.” Americans are captivated by Indians yet many people will go through their entire life without knowing an Indian or spending any time on a reservation.

 

Life on a reservation or “rez life” is often associated with poverty and alcoholism. Treuer does not shy away from these realities. There are heartbreaking stories of unimaginable poverty throughout the book. Numbers also reveal a bleak existence: no running water until the late 1990s, 80% unemployment rates and a median household income of $17,000. This does not sum up “rez life” completely, though. Treuer writes, “What one finds on reservations is more than scars, tears, blood, and noble sentiment. There is beauty in Indian life, as well as meaning....We love our reservations.”

 

Rez Life is not a dismal book, by any means. There are touching (and often very humorous) stories of family life throughout. Treuer reminds us that not all Indians are poor and not all reservations are poor. The wealthy Seminole nation is the current owner of the Hard Rock Cafe franchise. This proves, as Treuer puts it, that the Seminoles have been “kicking ass and taking names for a very long time.”

 

Treuer is the perfect writer for this book. He is a journalist and creative writing professor who knows how to synthesize a massive, complicated subject into personal, engaging stories. He has a keen attention to detail and is a master storyteller who also grew up on a reservation. Treuer is an Ojibwe Indian, raised on Leech Lake Reservation in Northern Minnesota. His father is an Austrian Jew and Holocaust survivor, his mother a tribal court judge. Indeed, his personal story (interspersed throughout the book) makes for a fascinating biography. Readers who enjoy biographies, modern history and cultural studies will not want to miss Rez Life.

 

Zeke

 
 

Rise of the Third Reich

Rise of the Third Reich

posted by:
May 24, 2012 - 6:01am

HitlerlandWhy? How? Who hasn’t posed these questions when learning about Adolph Hitler, Nazism’s demonic agendas, and the passivity of world powers like the United States in the face of Germany’s aggressive militancy? In Hitlerland: American Eyewitnesses to the Nazi Rise to Power, author Andrew Nagorski provides insight into the ascension of  Hitler through  first person accounts of American reporters, foreign service officials, and other prominent US citizens living and working abroad.

 

Comparisons between Hitlerland and Erik Larson’s bestselling In the Garden of Beasts are inevitable as both books concern themselves with Hitler and his National Socialists’ power grab in the period leading up to World War II.  While Larson’s book focuses primarily on viewing history through the eyes of the US Ambassador William Dodd and his soon-to-be infamous daughter Martha, Nagorski documents his story with varied voices such as author Sinclair Lewis and his journalist wife Dorothy Thompson, historian William Shirer, reporter Edgar Mowrer and diplomat Truman Smith.  The cast of characters named in Larson’s book, such as self-avowed half-American Hitler confidante Putzi Hanfstaengl, reappears in Hitlerland but Nagorski fleshes out their stories and places them into the bigger picture. Nagorski excels at explaining the back story of Nazi Germany, looking at the humiliating German defeat in WWI, the conditions imposed under the Treaty of Versailles, the deterioration of the Germany economy, and the decline of moral standards a la Cabaret. He also details the casually anti-Semitic attitudes of the times both in Europe and in the United States.   The book’s timeline is a rather straightforward chronology which contributes to an ease of understanding the events in context and the cumulative effect of primary source material conveys the horror building in the fatherland. Hitlerland is an excellent choice for history buffs and neophytes alike.

Lori

 
 

Summer Thrills

Summer Thrills

posted by:
May 23, 2012 - 4:01am

Thriller 3: Love is MurderAre you looking for a thrill this summer? Love is Murder is a new anthology of romantic suspense short stories that haven’t been published anywhere else. This volume, which is edited by Sandra Brown, will be released in time for summer, and it’s a great way to try out some new thriller writers who you may not already know. The anthology brings readers a mix of stories written by some of today’s best known writers along with some up-and-comers. Some of the authors included in the anthology are Allison Brennan, Heather Graham, Carla Neggers, Brenda Novak, and Lee Child.

 

Love is Murder is the third anthology produced exclusively by members of the International Thriller Writers, a group of authors who write fiction and nonfiction that is broadly categorized as thrillers or suspense. The organization’s goal is to promote and recognize the thriller genre, and its membership is a who’s who of bestselling authors.

 

This anthology is being published in time for the International Thriller Writers’ annual ThrillerFest. This year, the event will take place July 11-14 in New York City.  ThrillerFest is a four day celebration of thriller books, the writers who create them, and the fans who love them. The event will feature Lee Child, Jack Higgins, John Sandford, Catherine Coulter, and many more! All of the details on the event are available here

Beth

 
 

Nancy on the Case

Nancy on the Case

posted by:
May 23, 2012 - 1:11am

Nancy Clancy, Super SleuthThe Cape Mermaid MysteryThere’s a new girl detective in town. As readers know from Jane O’Connor’s Fancy Nancy picture book series, Nancy Clancy likes to live her life just a little bit fancier than most other people. She is now also the star of her first chapter book for young readers!  In Nancy Clancy, Super Sleuth, Nancy is taking on a new challenge and becoming a sleuth, which she explains is a fancy word for detective.  To get into her detective persona, she dons a pink trench coat and carries a magnifying glass with rhinestones on it.  She and her best friend Bree are looking for a mystery to solve.  They find one at her school when her teacher's special blue marble goes missing. Can Nancy and Bree solve the mystery, and return Mr. D's favorite memento?

 

Nancy Clancy is inspired by another super sleuth--Nancy Drew. If the traditional Nancy Drew mysteries are still a little too challenging for your young reader, the Nancy Drew and the Clue Crew series is a great starting point. These short chapter books feature eight-year-old Nancy Drew who forms a club to solve mysteries with her friends in River Heights.  The newest release in the series is The Cape Mermaid Mystery. Nancy Drew and her friends go on a vacation to Cape Mermaid, New Jersey. After they hear spooky noises and there’s a possible ghost sighting at the old inn on the beach, they begin to wonder if it’s the rumored ghost of Cape Mermaid. This is a job for the Clue Crew!

Beth