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Fifty Shades of Crime

Fifty Shades of Crime

posted by:
October 23, 2012 - 8:01am

CrusherHigh school dropout Finn Maguire spends his days selling pseudo-food at the Max Snax and his nights watching tv with his stepdad, an unemployed actor trying to write his own perfect role. When Finn arrives home from work one night, he finds his stepfather bludgeoned to death with his 1992 Best Newcomer award. The pursuit of the killer drives the story in Crusher, the debut novel by Niall Leonard. 

 

In working-class London, corruption is rampant and Joseph McGovern (a.k.a. The Guvnor) rules the streets with an iron fist. Finn’s stepfather was using The Guvnor as a springboard for his script, spinning a loosely-fictional yarn about the crime lord and his subordinates, one of whom plots a violent takeover. The police seem doggedly-focused on Finn as the main suspect in the murder, so he decides to launch his own investigation. He fears that the script may have hit too close to home, so he begins at the Guvnor’s mansion. Playing dumb, he bumbles his way into a job so that he can keep searching for clues. He soon begins uncovering secrets and revealing connections that turn his world upside-down.

 

Leonard, husband of best-selling author E. L. James, has written for many British television series including Wire in the Blood and Ballykissangel. He packs Crusher with heart-pounding action, leaving the reader as breathless as a boxer in the final round of a bout. The raw language and violence make the novel an appropriate read for older teens and young adults. Recommended for fans of true crime or gritty realism such as Sons of Anarchy.

Sam

 
 

Vampires at the Barn Raising

Vampires at the Barn Raising

posted by:
October 23, 2012 - 7:44am

The Hallowed OnesJust when you think you’ve read every possible permutation of the teen vampire trope, along comes an author to prove you wrong. Laura Bickle’s entrancing coming of age novel The Hallowed Ones follows Amish teen Katie as she contemplates marriage to Elijah. As one of the Plain folk, Katie knows she must follow the tenets of the Ordnung with unquestioning devotion. But Katie wants more from life than chores and family. She looks forward to her Rumspringa, a time when Amish youth are allowed a taste of the outside world before being baptized and fully committing to the church.

 

Bickle has created a believable, likable heroine. Abundant details of cloistered Amish life are smoothly woven into the narrative, making for a fascinating read. The author slowly builds suspense, as limited knowledge of something terribly wrong in the outside world filters into the sect. Soon, no one is allowed in or out of the fenced community. Some type of biological weapon has infected men, turning them into insatiable, flesh-tearing vampires. Only sanctified ground is safe.

 

When Katie offers asylum in her family’s dog barn to a badly injured young man, she knows it is the ultimate act of rebellion. Their relationship grows as she nurtures him back to health. Alex admires her for her intelligence and resourcefulness, rather than gentleness of word and deed. A rift grows between Katie and Elijah, as she resists committing to both him and the church. As the novel draws to a close, it becomes apparent that there are vampires within the gates. Katie’s resolve is put to the test. She has an ally in elderly Mr. Stoltz, the community’s Hexenmeister. He alone understands the true nature of the invasive evil. Vampires blanch at the sight of his protective hex signs and missives to heaven. How can they eradicate the evil within? Readers will be riveted by this uniquely told novel that skillfully blends bucolic realism with unspeakable horror.

Paula G.

 
 

And Justice for All

And Justice for All

posted by:
October 22, 2012 - 8:45am

The Round HouseAward-winning author and owner of the Birchbark Books store in Minnesota, Louise Erdrich is of both European and Native American descent. Her Ojibwe heritage is an integral part of her latest novel, The Round House, which revolves around a crime committed against a woman of the Chippewa tribe.

 

Narrated by thirteen-year-old Joe, the story opens with a brutal attack on Joe’s mother Geraldine, a tribal enrollment specialist. Deeply traumatized and unable to cope, Geraldine withdraws to her bedroom, stymieing the police investigation. Joe’s father, a tribal lawyer, is convinced the violence was not random and enlists Joe’s help in reviewing pertinent legal cases which he believes will lead them to the perpetrator. With the help of friends and extended family, Joe uncovers evidence pointing to Linden Lark, a white man with a family history of checkered relations with the Chippewa. Unfortunately, while Geraldine knows the assault took place near the Round House, the reservation’s spiritual center, she cannot pinpoint the exact location and the area includes both tribal lands and state-owned property. With no clear jurisdiction, the case cannot be prosecuted and Lark is freed.

 

Erdrich braids together elements of native culture and mythology, Southern Gothic style, and the commonality of the male adolescent experience, all of which drive Joe’s decisions.  The devastating impact, both past and present, of alcohol on Indian families is unmistakable. Relations between the tribal members and the white community are repeatedly shown as tenuous, the truce uneasy. 

 

The Round House is a multi-faceted jewel.  It is a coming-of-age story, a view of contemporary Native American reservation life, and a thriller turning on legal niceties while relentlessly moving to an inevitable conclusion. Erdrich’s afterword includes information about organizations working to correct the difficulties of prosecuting reservation crimes, especially sexual assault against Native women. 

 

Lori

 
 

There’s No Place Like Home

There’s No Place Like Home

posted by:
October 22, 2012 - 8:15am

The Soldier's WifeBritish Major Dan Riley is returning home to his family after a six month tour of duty in Afghanistan in The Soldier’s Wife, by Joanna Trollope. International bestseller Trollope uses her sixteenth novel to explore the issue of military re-entry and its ripple effect on family members.

 

Dan is returned safely to his wife, Alexa, their three-year-old twins, and his stepdaughter Isabel, but he struggles to adjust. On the surface his family seems to support him, including his proud father and grandfather, both retired military men.  But underneath, tensions are boiling.  Alexa has been offered an exciting teaching position which she cannot accept because of Dan’s likely promotion and yet another move. Isabel is in boarding school, the only good option for the transient military families, and is miserable and running away. And Dan is spending all his time on the base, unable to break the bonds he forged during battle and unwilling to communicate and open up to his wife.

 

Soon everyone who knows the Riley family is trying to help them save their marriage, but it’s up to Alexa to decide if she can sacrifice her needs and those of her family to support Dan’s commitment to his work. And Dan needs to learn to share emotionally with his wife in an effort to bridge the distance between them. Trollope illuminates the complexities of modern life in this story of a family striving to balance duty and ambition. With her signature cast of universally appealing, multigenerational characters, The Soldier's Wife is a timely and nuanced look into the lives of soldiers, their families, and their homecomings from the front lines.

 

Maureen

categories:

 
 

What the Servants Know

What the Servants Know

posted by:
October 22, 2012 - 7:55am

The St. Zita SocietyFans of Ruth Rendell will be delighted to read her new psychological thriller, The St. Zita Society. In this novel we meet the householders and staff of Hexam Place, a posh neighborhood where nothing is as it seems on the surface. June Caldwell, professional companion and caregiver to Princess Susan Hapsburg, has taken it upon herself to bring fellow staff together to discuss problems and offer up solutions. They meet in the corner bar, and have named themselves the St. Zita Society. 

 

Rendell introduces the reader to an interesting group of characters, including handsome chauffer Henry who has an eye for the ladies, the mysterious gardener Dex, and Rabia, the young widowed nanny who has lost children of her own and seems to be overly attached to her young charge. We also meet some of the wealthy homeowners, like the Still family who are surviving a difficult and loveless marriage, and Roland and Damian, a couple who rent out flats in their home to the insufferable Thea and the aging Miss Grieves. As any reader of Rendell will know, something is bound to go terribly wrong and plunge several characters into a situation that will be difficult if not impossible to escape from. In the St. Zita Society, a faulty bannister, an unfaithful wife and a nosy elderly neighbor will become the recipe for disaster.

 

Rendell, well known for the Inspector Wexford novels, often writes stand-alone thrillers that explore the psyches of several main characters. Many of her novels have become successful movies on the BBC, and most recently her novel 13 Steps Down has been adapted for television. The St. Zita Society will satisfy any fan of Rendell’s work, but will also appeal to new readers who would like a sinister snapshot of life on a wealthy London street.

 

Doug

categories:

 
 

Don't Read at Night

Don't Read at Night

posted by:
October 19, 2012 - 8:11am

The TurningJust in time for Halloween, The Turning by Francine Prose will wind up your anxiety level and tighten you in the grasp of fear. This teen novel is a retelling of the classic Henry James novella The Turn of the Screw. The setting has been updated to take place in the present day, and is told through a series of letters exchanged between a teenage boy named Jack and his girlfriend Sophie. Sophie’s father has procured a summer job for Jack, babysitting two children for a considerable wage on a remote island. The couple realizes her father’s motivation is an attempt to end their romance, but in order for Jack to attend college with Sophie in the fall he has no choice but to take the position. When he is informed that there will be no phone service, television, or internet connection available he almost changes his mind. Through their correspondence, the reader experiences Jack’s loneliness and initial misgivings as they progress to outright distress.

 

During the boat voyage to the island, some elderly passengers recount the story of a tragic drowning death of a couple attempting to elope from the island years before. They also allude to some mysterious happenings in the more recent past, painting Jack’s destination in shadowy details. On his arrival to the children’s home, feelings of dread and foreboding emanate from the creepy gothic mansion painted funeral black. It is full of confusing darkened hallways and unused or locked rooms. The children themselves are unusual, formally polite, dressed in old-fashioned attire, and frequently exchange furtive glances alluding to secret confidences.

 

Ghostly apparitions begin haunting Jack: a tall menacing man watches him through the library window; a beautiful woman stares from across a field. No one else in the household seems aware of these spirits. Sophie grows increasingly alarmed as Jack’s letters reflect how the stress of the situation is taking a toll. This is a frightening tale, which pays homage to the original, and exposes a new generation of readers to some real creepy fun.

Jeanne

 
 

Secrets and Lies

Secrets and Lies

posted by:
October 19, 2012 - 7:05am

The Secret KeeperReaders know that Australian author Kate Morton can be counted on to bring them a fascinating story. Her new novel The Secret Keeper examines the idea that we don’t always know the ones we love as well as we believe we do. In the summer of 1961, 16-year-old Laurel had left a family party to daydream in the tree house. She saw a man come to her house and speak with her mother Dorothy. Suddenly, she witnessed her mother stabbing the man to death. The police ruled that it was an act of self-defense, but Laurel knew there was more to the story. The family never spoke about it again, and Laurel’s siblings were never told what happened. That day changed Laurel’s world and her family forever.

 

Fifty years later, Dorothy’s life is near its end. The family gathers to celebrate her 90th birthday, and Laurel returns to her childhood home where she begins piecing together clues about Dorothy’s life before she met and married Laurel’s father. The story of Dorothy’s past takes the reader to wartime London and into the lives of Dorothy, Jimmy, and Vivien. Laurel finally learns the truth about Dorothy’s life in London and the evening in 1941 that resulted in a secret that Dorothy kept for the rest of her life.The story is filled with twists and turns, leaving the reader as intrigued by Dorothy’s past as Laurel is. In The Secret Keeper, Morton intertwines past and present to create a riveting story that will stay with the reader long after the last page is finished.

Beth

categories:

 
 

Magical Music and Cambridge Spires

The Bellwether RevivalsBenjamin Wood’s debut novel The Bellwether Revivals begins with a mystery: a crime scene with two people dead and a third barely alive. But what happened prior? The rest of the book is about the events leading up to that moment. Oscar Lowe is a working-class twenty-something who makes a living as a care assistant at a nursing home. Eden and Iris Bellwether are ambitious siblings from a privileged background who both study at Cambridge. A chance meeting brings Oscar into their elite circle, which he soon finds is convoluted and laden with social traps. Oscar begins a relationship with Iris but finds that threatened by the increasing eccentricities of Eden, who believes himself capable of healing through hypnosis and the power of his music. Eden is also the clear leader of their group of friends, which begins to take on cult-like characteristics as Eden’s delusions become more grandiose. When Eden starts to feel he’s losing control of Iris and his parents, real tragedy ensues.

 

A classic story in one sense of the clash between the haves and have nots of society, this is also a gothic tale which delves into diverse topics such as mental illness, social isolation and music theory. Moreover, it is an intergenerational story, where those who were once young and charting the pathway to new innovations are now dependent upon and look up to the younger generation of today. Similar to The Talented Mr. Ripley or School Ties, Wood paints a picture that shows that being wealthy isn’t all it is cracked up to be. Fans of British novels and psychological drama will enjoy this story of complex relationships and intrigue. 

Melanie

 
 

After the Flash

After the Flash

posted by:
October 18, 2012 - 8:11am

Poison PrincessKresley Cole opens her new Arcana Chronicles series for older teens with Poison Princess. Evie Greene is a sixteen-year-old cheerleader from a privileged upbringing whose life changed last year when she began having apocalyptic hallucinations. She begins her junior year of high school desperate to fit in and get her life back, but the terrible hallucinations begin again. This time, other strange things start happening to her. Evie knows that telling anyone about what she sees would definitely cause her mother to send her back to the Children’s Learning Center, a mental institution for disturbed children where she spent the summer “recovering” from her visions.

 

Then, the Flash happens, and everything that Evie saw comes true. The blinding light and heat kills most people, leaving behind only ash. All plant-life dies, and the Bagmen, zombie-like creatures desperate for water, now roam the world that was left behind killing the survivors to drink their blood. Evie meets up with another survivor, Jackson Deveaux, the gorgeous Cajun bad boy who tormented her during her last week of school. Evie is now suffering auditory hallucinations and debilitating visions where she sees the evil Poison Princess and hears voices telling her that the Major Arcana, other people with talents based on the most powerful cards in the tarot deck, are hunting her down. When Evie was a child, her grandmother called her Empress and told her that one day the Arcana would come for her. Jackson and Evie set out for North Carolina to try to find Evie’s grandmother who Evie believes can explain what is happening.

 

Readers who know Cole’s Immortals After Dark series for adults are familiar with her remarkable talent for world-building. The world that she creates for this new series, along with the complex tarot card-based mythology, builds slowly throughout the book. It does take some time for the reader to understand where the series is going, but the payoff is huge. Readers will be clamoring for the next story in the series to find out what happens to Evie when she finally understands and accepts her fate.

Beth

 
 

Dreamboat Ann - and Nancy

Kicking and DreamingHeart has been around for decades, breaking into the largely male world of rock music earlier than most female performers. In Kicking & Dreaming: A Story of Heart, Soul, and Rock & Roll, Ann and Nancy Wilson alternately describe their extraordinary lives in the music industry. Picking up stories that the other starts, the format reads smoothly, and indicates the strong ties these sisters have shared all these years. Beginning with the childhoods they experienced as daughters of a major in the Marines, Ann, Nancy, their older sister Lynn and their mother moved constantly, finding it hard to put down roots. Because of this, their family (known as “The Big Five”) focused inwardly. Ann, a classic middle child, dealt with body image and stuttering problems that vanished when she found her voice. Later, Nancy, the youngest, found comfort in relationships with her band mates.

 

The story of the band’s genesis and first big break is vividly recounted, along with the bumps along the way. Their first hit “Magic Man” was released while they were briefly living in Vancouver, and they became stars in Canada before in their native country. This period brought success after classics like “Dog and Butterfly” and “Barracuda” became showstoppers. After some rough times and disappointing album sales in the cocaine-fueled early 80s, Heart’s second-act rebirth came with hits like “What About Love”, “These Dreams” and “Alone”. Included, too, is the interesting story of how Ann, to this day, refuses to sing their controversial 1989 hit “All I Want to Do is Make Love to You”. Full of tidbits about musicians the women have come to know over the years, including Stevie Nicks, Elton John, John Mellencamp, and many in the Seattle rock scene, this is a strong memoir about a life on the road, but also the story of two sisters who broke through a glass ceiling and came out on top.

Todd