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Celebrate the 2015 Tony Awards

Tony AwardsThe Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre, more commonly known as the Tony Award, recognizes achievement in Broadway theatre. The 2015 awards will be presented by the American Theatre Wing and The Broadway League on Sunday, June 7 with co-hosts Kristin Chenoweth and Alan Cumming.

 

The frontrunner for Best Play is The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime, based on the critically acclaimed novel by Mark Haddon. Director Marianne Elliot has been universally praised for bringing the world of Christopher Boone, a young boy with Asperger's syndrome, to life. Vying in the same category is Wolf Hall, based on the best-selling novel by Hilary Mantel.

 

An American in Paris, based on the famed movie starring Leslie Caron and Gene Kelly, garnered 12 nominations for Best Musical. Fun Home also received 12 nominations and is based on the graphic novel by Allison Bechdel, which is the autobiographical story of Bechdel’s coming to terms with her sexuality and dysfunctional family. Sit back and imagine yourself on the Great White Way as you check out 2015's Best Musical cast recordings from our collections. Also available for your listening pleasure are the cast recordings for all three of the nominated Best Musical Revivals: On the Town, On the Twentieth Century and the timeless The King and I. Enjoy the show!

Maureen

 
 

The Great Divide

The Great Divide

posted by:
June 4, 2015 - 7:00am

The Great Divide: The Conflict Between Washington and Jefferson that Defined a NationWhen considering our founding fathers, we often think of them in grandiose terms; great men of sterling character who rose above petty conflicts in order to form a perfect union. Thomas Fleming presents a portrait of these men as all too human in The Great Divide: The Conflict Between Washington and Jefferson that Defined a Nation.

 

The creation of this new nation weathered a major storm between two factions: the Federalists, who believed that in order to survive we must have a strong central government to unite us, and the Democratic-Republicans, who feared the engulfment of the states into a dictatorship. Serving as a constant reminder of previous servitude was the British government’s policy of kidnapping American sailors and impressing them into Great Britain’s Navy. Another source of controversy was the ongoing revolution in France, with the Democratic-Republicans rejoicing over the “triumph of the people” and the Federalists aghast at the liberal use of the guillotine. 

 

Thomas Fleming’s brilliant portrait of the men and their times serves as a reminder of the miracle of independence, self-governance and the balance of powers. He explores the evolution through the eyes of George Washington, James Madison and Thomas Jefferson as their friendships ebb and flow with the political tide. These are not the stiff portraits hanging in the White House, rather, they are all too human, replete with petty jealousies, personal agendas and political ambitions. The origins of their arguments still resonate in our political landscape today. 

 

A prolific writer, Fleming’s works include Washington’s Secret War: The Hidden History of Valley Forge, Now We Are Enemies and A Disease of the Public Mind. He has also contributed to PBS series The Irish in America and Liberty: The American Revolution. He has served as president of the Society of American Historians and is an honorary member of the New York State Society of the Cincinnati.

Leanne

 
 

Sisters of Blood and Spirit

Sisters of Blood and Spirit by Kady CrossBestselling author Kady Cross has a new young adult novel Sisters of Blood and Spirit. The dynamic combination of action, adventure and a dash of romance, make this paranormal pleasure hard to put down.

 

Lark is not your normal teenager. When her twin sister Wren was still born their relationship didn’t end there. Wren became an almost constant companion to her sister. As a child, people around town just thought she was talking to an imaginary friend. As a young adult, she simply appeared to be crazy. The stress of outside pressures and the desire to be with her sister so overwhelmed her that Lark attempted suicide. The failed attempt left Lark with special abilities beyond just the capacity to see ghosts.

 

When Lark’s classmates decided to take a preternatural excursion to a local haunted asylum, they got more than they bargained for. It’s because of Lark’s reputation that they sought her out to help rid themselves of a ghostly hitchhiker with a penchant for razor blades. Lark’s loner disposition leaves her reluctant to help, but Wren has different plans.

 

Cross’ novel melds the Scooby gang feel of Buffy the Vampire Slayer with the otherworldly feel of the Supernatural series. Its character-driven dual narrative makes for a fast-paced romp that will keep you turning the page. If you dig Kady Cross’ unique style, you can also find her under the pen names Kate Locke, Kate Cross or Kathryn Smith. 

Randalee

 
 

Turtleface and Beyond

Turtleface and Beyond

posted by:
June 2, 2015 - 7:00am

Turtleface and Beyond By Arthur BradfordDon’t judge this book by its simple cover; the stories contained within Arthur Bradford’s collection Turtleface and Beyond are highly original and situationally hilarious. Turtleface and Beyond features a series of stories starring Georgie, a hapless, lackadaisical fellow who seems to be a magnet for the bizarre.

 

In the titular "Turtleface," Georgie is canoeing down a lazy river with his friend Otto and their girlfriends, when Otto spies an imposing cliff and wants to leap from it. Against Georgie's advice, Otto scrambles up the mountainside and dives into the river below, where his face meets a meandering turtle. Georgie is racked with guilt not because of Otto's foolish accident, but because the turtle's shell is fissured.

 

"Lost Limbs" is the story of Georgie's unrequited interest in Lenore, a woman with a prosthetic arm. Lenore interprets Georgie’s lack of interest in her prosthesis as self-absorbed and ignoble, but poor Georgie didn’t even realize her arm was fake until their second date. Lenore breaks things off with Georgie, who is content with her decision until months later when he gets his leg caught in a wood chipper. As his calf is mangled in the machine, his first thought is, "Hm, I should call that lovely girl with the fake hand."

 

Georgie works the graveyard shift in an attorney’s library in "217-Pound Dog," where he meets Jim Tewilliger, a partner at the firm whose life is beginning to unravel. Sensing Georgie's kind nature, Jim asks him for help acquiring some marijuana. Georgie senses Jim is a man in need of a rare kind of help, so he acquiesces. Jim's behavior around the office becomes increasingly erratic, and Georgie, left vouching for him in a whirlwind of unfinished work and fast food wrappers, wonders what his acquaintance’s endgame entails.

 

Arthur Bradford’s imagination illuminates Georgie’s misadventures in Turtleface and Beyond, a collection genre lovers will find funny, laconic and clever. 

Tom

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The Royal We

The Royal We

posted by:
June 1, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Royal WeThe Duke and Duchess of Cambridge’s romance inspired the scrumptious The Royal We by Heather Cocks and Jessica Morgan. Indeed, in their forward, they thank the royal couple for having the second royal baby right when their novel hits the shelves!

 

In this enjoyable glimpse at the improbable path from American coed to princess, fashion bloggers (Go Fug Yourself) Cocks and Morgan replace William with Nicholas and exchange American Rebecca “Bex” Porter for Kate. The novel opens with Bex, anticipating their wedding, retelling their story and reflecting on the sacrifices this love affair has already demanded and the future pressures she anticipates.

 

Bex was the practical twin, unlike her sister Lacey, who never met a love story she didn’t embrace. But when Bex goes to Oxford and finds herself in the same dorm as the charming and handsome Prince Nicholas, a fast friendship quickly turns to romance. Dating the future king of England is glamorous, complete with ritzy trips and dinners at Kensington Palace. While she truly loves Nick, at times the accompanying baggage is overwhelming. Between the phony friends, prickly family members, competitive ex-girlfriends and ubiquitous tabloids, Bex struggles with the burden of royal perfection. This witty unmasking of life behind the palace gates is an entertaining romance with a dynamic yet relatable couple. The equally diverting supporting cast, from school friends to snarky royals, are all sharply drawn and intrinsic to the story. And never fear, Prince Harry is definitely in attendance in the form of Nick’s dashing yet disreputable brother Freddie, while paparazzi favorite Pippa is easily discernable in Bex’s slightly self-centered twin Lacey. This happily-ever-after boasts a strong sense of humor and just a dash of reality to create a picture perfect contemporary fairy tale.

Maureen

 
 

Finding Zero

Finding Zero

posted by:
May 29, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Finding ZeroFinding Zero: A Mathematician’s Odyssey to Uncover the Origins of Numbers by Amir Aczel is about a man’s love of numbers. Actually, it is much more than that, but numbers are at the heart of this story. Aczel is not just your average mathematics scholar. He's an adventurer, part Indiana Jones and part Isaac Newton, who is relentless in his pursuit of the origins of numbers. While most of us probably have not considered just how our numeric system — particularly zero — came to be, Aczel has been obsessed with numbers since he was a young boy.

 

Aczel’s odyssey began when his teacher asked his first grade class what they would like to learn in school. His response was “Where numbers come from,” which set him on a course that would take him around the world. For the most part, Aczel’s narrative is aimed at the average person, and he limits the use of mathematical jargon to terms that most anyone can understand. While Western society uses what are commonly called Arabic numbers, Aczel points out that this name is misleading. True Arabic numbers do not resemble our digits ranging from 0 to 9. (You can view an illustration of Arabic numbers.)

 

So, how did our modern Anglo-European numbers evolve and where did they originate? While Aczel attempts to answer these questions, he encounters some interesting obstacles along the way. His odyssey is an intriguing one and, at times, seems to involve more questions than answers. Still, for anyone who enjoys a book that gives the reader ideas to ponder, Finding Zero offers plenty of mental exercise.

 

Regina

 
 

The Long and Faraway Gone

The Long and Faraway Gone

posted by:
May 28, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Long and Faraway GoneTwo lives, seemingly unrelated, converge in unforeseen circumstances in Lou Berney’s The Long and Faraway Gone. Two events haunt their victims: the brutal murder of six movie theater employees, and the disappearance of a beautiful young woman. The ghosts from the past simply will not let go of the living.

 

Wyatt, the only survivor of the movie theater massacre, escapes Oklahoma City through his work, moving from one state to the next. Infamous for that single event, Wyatt changes his name and becomes a private investigator. A favor for a friend will start him on a path to the past to confront the one question that was never answered: Why was he spared?

 

Julianna worshipped her older sister, Genevieve, who took her to the fair and then disappeared forever. Genevieve left Julianna with $10 to buy food and told her she would be back in 15 minutes. In many ways, the now-37-year-old Julianna is still sitting on the bench at the fair waiting for her sister to return. Julianna is willing to sacrifice her career, her security and even her life to discover what happened to her sister that day.

 

As Wyatt works to discover the identity of a vandal determined to destroy his client’s business, he also uncovers the layers of denial that have dominated his life. As Julianna risks her sanity to uncover her sister’s fate, she must explore the demons that drove Genevieve to leave her that night.

 

Told in alternating voices, Berney twists his tale of obsession and corruption, of power and greed. Thoughtful, complex and absorbing, this character-driven novel is sure to please fans of intrigue. Berney’s unique plotting intertwines the characters’ stories deftly, proving that we can touch one another’s lives in wholly unexpected ways.  

 

Leanne

 
 

Things We Know by Heart

Things We Know by Heart

posted by:
May 27, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Things We Know By HeartAt the end of her junior year, the unthinkable happened to Quinn Sullivan when her boyfriend Trent was killed in an accident. Quinn is destroyed by her loss and, in her grief, begins to focus on the people who received Trent’s donated organs. Many of these people respond to her when she reaches out to them, with the exception of the teen who received Trent’s heart. Quinn becomes obsessed with finding this teen, and when Jessi Kirby’s Things We Know by Heart begins, she has done just that.

 

Quinn travels to the nearby town of Shelter Cove to investigate Colton Thomas, the heart patient who received Trent’s heart. The two bump into each other at the local coffee shop. Colton is immediately taken by Quinn, and much to her surprise, Quinn feels the same about him. Despite her fear of forgetting Trent, Quinn can’t help but want to spend time with Colton. Colton’s fun-loving attitude begins to pull Quinn out of her grief, but she keeps being pulled back by their connection through Trent.

 

Kirby has done a wonderful job writing a unique teen romance. Each chapter begins with a quote about the heart, some medical, some from literature, others from philosophy. Quinn and Colton’s story will capture the reader’s attention from the very first chapter. Fans of Sarah Dessen’s novels will enjoy Things We Know by Heart.

Laura

 
 

Master Thieves

Master Thieves

posted by:
May 26, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Master ThievesStephen Kurkjian is a man on a mission. The Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative journalist from The Boston Globe revisits what remains the largest property crime in U.S. history in his new book, Master Thieves: The Boston Gangsters Who Pulled Off the World’s Greatest Art Heist. It's a detailed accounting of the events, suspects and stalled investigation that has mired Boston's Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in a 25-year-old mystery. Perhaps not surprisingly, Kurkjian has his own theories on who-done-it and why, after all these years, the crime remains unsolved.

 

The FBI’s website calls art theft “stealing history.” Indeed, the 13 stolen works taken in the wee hours  on March 18, 1990 by two men wearing fake mustaches and disguised as police officers represent a distinct and priceless collection by a few of the world's true masters, including Rembrandt, Vermeer, Manet and Degas.

 

Kurkjian, with his fast-paced narrative and plethora of research, aims to crack this case. There are brief descriptions of all the players at the beginning of the book. Readers will need the list, as Kurkjian lays out a web of who’s who in the Boston underworld, from low level crooks to mob bosses. And just when you think the author is getting repetitive, Kurkjian offers up intriguing bits of the sometimes strange efforts to recover the paintings. He also expresses pointed frustration over the FBI's mishandling of the investigation from the get-go. He notes that there hasn't been a single confirmed sighting of the works. He calls it a "disgrace."

 

For those who enjoy the logistics of the chase, Master Thieves has plenty to offer to both nonfiction and fiction readers. Written in an accessible journalistic style that includes several interviews with key figures, Kurkjian brings his 20-year obsession to his readers, who will ultimately form their own opinions on why this crime remains unsolved today.

 

Cynthia

 
 

Know Your Beholder

Know Your Beholder

posted by:
May 25, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Know Your BeholderThere are few tragedies capable of eliciting tears from a man in his early 30s. The death of a beloved pet, the dissolution of a marriage, maybe; or more realistically, the death of a beloved Xbox, the dissolution of a favorite band. In Adam Rapp’s Know Your Beholder, narrator and central character Francis Falbo bears his soul while marinating in his overlord’s bathrobe and cultivating his newly sprouted beard.

 

In snowy Pollard, Illinois, Francis Falbo’s rising indie rock band, The Third Policeman, feels the heat of rapid ascension and cinders into nothingness almost exactly as his wife Sheila Ann abandons him for another man. With nothing going for him other than a few new bristles encroaching on his face, he moves into the attic of his childhood home, which his father bequeathed to him before uprooting and fleeing to Florida after the death of his wife. Clad in a bathrobe and two pairs of thermal pajamas which eventually graft to his skin, Francis decides to become an amateur landlord and converts the spacious dwelling into a couple of apartments. He assembles a colorful cast of tenants, including a family of former circus performers looking to settle down, an ice-fishing enthusiast with an incredibly rotund stomach and his ex wife’s burnout brother.

 

Francis chronicles his woes day by day on an old typewriter and gradually realizes he has become agoraphobic, but he disguises his fear as a personality quirk as he accomplishes various landlording tasks like collecting rent and unclogging sinks. As winter passes, the Falbo house embraces the thaw and collectively hopes the spring will bring reprieve to their lives bereft of happiness.

 

Know Your Beholder is about overcoming heartbreak and is perfectly balanced, with the weight of tragedy elevating wry and witty humor laced with culturally relevant references to the indie music, art and literary scenes. 

Tom

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