Welcome to the Baltimore County Public Library.

Baltimore County Public Library logo Sign up now. Read from June 16 to August 10. Fizz, Boom, READ! Summer Reading Club.
   
Type of search:   
BCPL on FacebookBCPL on YouTubeBCPL on TwitterBCPL on FlickrBCPL on Tumblr

Between the Covers / Shhhh... we're reading.   Photo of reading after bedtime
RSS this blog

Tags

Adult

+ Fiction

   Fantasy

   Graphic Novel

   Historical

   Horror

   Humor

   Legal

   Literary

   Magical Realism

   Media Tie-In

   Mystery

   Mythology

   Paranormal

   Romance

   Science Fiction

   Thriller

+ Nonfiction

   Author Interviews

   Awards

   In the News

Teen

+ Fiction

   Adventure

   Dystopian

   Fantasy

   Graphic Novel

   Historical

   Humor

   Media Tie-In

   Mystery

   Paranormal

   Realistic

   Romance

   Science Fiction

   Steampunk

   Nonfiction

   Author Interviews

   Awards

   In the News

Children

+ Fiction

   Adventure

   Beginning Reader

   Concepts

   Fantasy

   First Chapter Book

   Graphic Novel

   Historical

   Humor

   Media Tie-In

   Mystery

   Picture Book

   Realistic

   Tales

+ Nonfiction

   Author Interviews

   Awards

   In the News

Bloggers

 

One Tough Broad

One Tough Broad

posted by:
March 25, 2013 - 7:45am

Rage Against the DyingIn Becky Masterman’s chilling debut thriller Rage Against the Dying, heroine Brigid Quinn spent her FBI career hunting the worst sexual predators. She is tough and self-reliant. After Brigid was forced to take early retirement from the FBI, she left that world behind entirely. Now, she now lives a quiet life with her new husband Carlo and their two pugs. Former priest Carlo knows little about that life or the person Brigid was before they met. Everything changes when Brigid’s past comes crashing into her present. A man named Floyd Lynch is arrested, and he confesses to being the Route 66 Killer. That case was one of the worst of Brigid’s career, resulting in the disappearance of her protégé Jessica. Lynch knows some key details that were never publicized, and he leads authorities to Jessica’s mummified remains. However, Brigid has reason to believe that his confession is false. Soon, Brigid realizes that she is being stalked, and she must find the killer to save herself.

 

Rage Against the Dying, which Masterman originally titled One Tough Broad, brings an exciting new character to the thriller world. Masterman says that her debut novel is “in some respects like a coming-of-age novel for an older woman.” Although 59-year-old Brigid is very confident in her strength and abilities, she is still learning about being a wife and friend. Masterman, whose previous career was in forensic textbook publishing, brings a level of realism to the brutal crimes that Brigid has seen. Rage Against the Dying is the kind of thriller that keeps readers up late at night and might make them sleep with the lights on.  

 

Beth

 
 

Chinua Achebe, 1930-2013

Things Fall ApartThere Was a CountryHow the Leopard Got His ClawsThe renowned author of African literature, Chinua Achebe, has died in Boston at the age of 82. He is best-known for his seminal 1958 novel Things Fall Apart, read by millions worldwide, and featured in the curriculum and reading lists of countless high schools and universities. This novel follows the life of Okonkwo, a proud Igbo man living in turn of the 19th century Nigeria, and the cultural changes that he must face and accept as British colonialism takes hold of the area and the only life he knows. Achebe also wrote a number of follow-up novels to this groundbreaking story. Confined to a wheelchair for the past twenty years following a car accident, he lived in the United States for the last two decades of his life, and was a professor of African Studies at Brown University in Providence.

 

Achebe also was a strong proponent of the rights of the people living in the once-breakaway Nigerian state of Biafra. His book There Was A Country: A Personal History of Biafra was published last year. Explaining the Nigerian civil war that took place in the late 1960s, this mélange of memoir and history reminded the world of an oft-forgotten war. Achebe also wrote an allegorical folktale which was republished last year with Mary GrandPré's illustrations. How the Leopard Got His Claws tells the story of a short-lived coup and the resulting return of the original power players, in terms that are understandable for all ages.

Todd

 
 

Going off the Grid

Going off the Grid

posted by:
March 22, 2013 - 7:45am

GhostmanIn his first novel, Ghostman, Roger Hobbs creates an exciting world of double dealing, casino heists, crime bosses and an intriguing main character caught in the middle. The Ghostman goes by many aliases and stays separate from the rest of the world. He is careful not to live in one location for very long, has no close associates, and doesn’t maintain a phone line or a personal email. He refuses to use his real name, but when a message comes to him for the persona Jack Delton, he knows that someone is contacting him to collect a debt. Years ago, the Ghostman made a fatal error during a heist in Kuala Lumpur, and Marcus, the mastermind of the heist, was sent to prison. Now Marcus has discovered a way to contact the Ghostman and he demands to be repaid with a very dangerous proposition involving stolen money from an Atlantic City casino. The money was newly printed by the Federal Reserve and contained a dye pack that will explode within the next two days. Marcus needs to find the thief and the cash, and contacts Ghostman with the general schematics of the plan. But plans with criminals can easily go awry, and soon our hapless anti-hero attracts the attention of a crime boss known at the Wolf as well as a rather tenacious FBI agent.  It will take a great deal of nerve and every trick at his disposal in order to come out alive.

 

The story is fast-paced and exciting. It unfolds in present day Atlantic City with the current plan of action, but interspersed are chapters told in flashback and the reader learns the history behind Ghostman’s debt to Marcus. Ghostman is a fantastic thriller that looks into the heart of the criminal world and examines what it takes to survive in such a hostile environment. Roger Hobbs is a new writer to watch, and is sure to please fans of nail-biting suspense.

Doug

categories:

 
 

Walk This Way

Walk This Way

posted by:
March 21, 2013 - 8:01am

Walking BaltimoreThe days are longer, the sun is shining, and flowers are starting to bloom. It’s time to get outside and get moving! Evan Balkan offers a multitude of opportunities for fun and interesting local adventures in Walking Baltimore: an Insider’s Guide to 33 Neighborhoods, Waterfront Districts, and Hidden Treasures in Charm City.

 

The well-known tourist attractions of Fells Point, Mount Vernon, and the Inner Harbor are of course represented, but this local author and CCBC professor also shares hidden gems that are spread across the breadth of the city. It is these lesser known corners of Baltimore which put the charm in Charm City, and these walks allow for a detailed exploration. Each area is presented as a 1 to 4 mile walk, and Balkan includes little-known facts, trivia, and stories about the neighborhood being toured. Forts, The Babe Ruth Birthplace and Museum, and the Gwynns Falls are among the many sights included on these varied walks, which truly offer something for everyone from history buff, to sports fan, to nature lover. Balkan also offers tips on parking and public transportation, and rates the difficulty level of each walk from easy to strenuous so readers can plan accordingly. Finally, for a more customized look at the walks, Balkan separates them by theme in an appendix. Themes include American Firsts, Writers & Readers, Museum Madness, and Green Spaces.

 

Visitors and newly transplanted residents will appreciate this compact guide as a way to learn more about the city beyond the Inner Harbor. Old-timers will utilize this handy read as a way to rediscover Baltimore’s rich history, beautiful landscapes, and fabulous neighborhoods.  All will enjoy the exercise and savor the sampling of culinary delights to be found on each walk. 

Maureen

 
 

Betcha Can't Eat Just One

Salt Sugar FatFat ChanceIt wasn’t merely a catchy slogan when the Lay’s potato chip commercial challenged you to eat just one. Like the rest of the food industry, Lay’s was banking on the fact that the ingredients in their products would make it difficult for consumers to stop crunching. Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Michael Moss’s new book Salt Sugar Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us will make you think twice before you pick up another cookie or sip another soda.

 

Moss explores how the processed food industry uses key ingredients to make their products more addictive, and the negative impact that those foods have had on our health. The processed foods that we find at our supermarkets are carefully formulated and tested to hit the consumer’s “bliss point,” the precise amount of sugar that will make the product most appealing to the greatest number of people. Through both the ingredients and the companies’ carefully targeted marketing, consumers are manipulated to buy and eat more and more of these products. Moss goes beyond the nutrition of junk food. He also explores the science of food and creates a business history of the food industry. Salt Sugar Fat is an intriguing and sometimes terrifying, look at this one trillion dollar per year industry.

 

Pediatric endocrinologist Dr. Robert Lustig also takes on the food industry in Fat Chance: Beating the Odds Against Sugar, Processed Food, Obesity, and Disease. After the US government recommended a low fat diet in the 1970s, the food industry responded by adding sugar to low fat products to make them taste better, which Lustig says has had disastrous results. Lustig, whose 90-minute lecture “Sugar: The Bitter Truth” has been viewed over 3 million times on YouTube, documents the connection between the added sugar in our food and the obesity epidemic.

Beth

 
 

Don't Know Much about History

What was the Gold Rush?What was the March on Washington?What was the Battle of Gettysburg?Engaging nonfiction chapter books intended for middle grade children are few and far between. A new series from Grosset & Dunlap succeeds in making history interesting, with titles that read with the ease of a novel. What Was the Gold Rush? by Joan Holub, brings to life the excitement of the discovery of gold at Sutter’s Mill in the Sierra Nevada foothills of California, and the migration of fortune seekers westward, beginning in 1849. She delves into the science of gold (How can you tell it’s the real thing?) as well as the reasons behind its worth. Readers learn about how the gold rush led to the buildup of major cities, and how Native Americans were affected by the influx of prospectors.

 

Kathleen Krull tackles such weighty topics as racism, slavery, and Jim Crow laws in What Was the March on Washington? This book explains civil rights in an easily accessible way, and introduces the concept of peaceful protests. Readers meet A. Philip Randolph, the civil rights activist who had the idea for a national march, and “organizing genius” Bayard Rustin, who brought the whole thing together in only two months. Jim O’Connor takes on the Civil War in What Was the Battle of Gettysburg?, a book that begins by explaining the unrest between the Northern and Southern states, details the strategies and battle maneuvers, and ends with Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address. Readers will enjoy a plethora of interesting asides, including an explanation of why a Sharps carbine rifle is far superior to a musket, and the story of the Union general who donated the bones of his amputated leg to a museum following the war.

 

Each What Was? title is liberally illustrated with relevant drawings, diagrams, and even photos designed to complement the text. One timeline at the end of each book provides a snapshot of important events related to the topic, while a second shows what was happening in the world at large during the same time period. Parents and librarians have a reason to rejoice, as the books all weigh in at 105 pages each, satisfying those teachers who tell students that the nonfiction titles they choose for book reports must be at least one hundred pages long. Also available is What Was the Boston Tea Party?, with more titles to come.

Paula G.

 
 

Feathered Frolic

Feathered Frolic

posted by:
March 20, 2013 - 8:02am

Flora and the FlamingoLucky DucklingsTwo new picture books celebrate our interaction with waterfowl. In the engaging, wordless Flora and the Flamingo, written and illustrated by Molly Idle, a young girl tries to emulate a balletic flamingo. Each beautifully illustrated spread shows the ease with which the bird poses, leaps, and dances. Meanwhile, Flora does her best to mimic the flamingo’s every move, some efforts more successful than others. The retro style of the illustration works well, and the generous use of white space on each page, some of which have extra flaps and fold-outs, make for an enjoyable read. A final splashdown between the two new friends embodies joy.

 

Lucky Ducklings, written by Eva Moore and illustrated by Nancy Carpenter, is based on a true event that occurred on Long Island. A mother duck has inadvertently lost her ducklings down a storm drain, and townsfolk must come to their rescue. Thankfully, onlookers to the scene recognize the ducklings’ peril (and the mother duck’s panic), and take action. Notably similar in some ways to Robert McCloskey’s classic Make Way for Ducklings, this title even gives a knowing nod to the earlier title in a scene near the book’s close. Carpenter’s warm illustrations capture the pastoral nature of the setting against the fluster and alarm of the situation.

Todd

 
 

Victorian Teen Spirit

Victorian Teen Spirit

posted by:
March 19, 2013 - 8:05am

Cinders & SapphiresSixteen-year-old Lady Ada Averly is returning to England in the spring of 1910, following a ten year stay in India, as Cinders & Sapphires by Lelia Rasheed opens. During this ocean voyage, Ada encounters Ravi, an Indian Oxford student, and the two share an unforgettable but forbidden kiss. Ada returns to the family estate, Somerton Court, with her younger sister Georgiana, and their father, Lord Westlake. This is not a pleasant voyage, however, as they are facing financial ruin and rumors of a scandal that removed Lord Westlake from his post in India.

 

Once back at Somerton, the servants are woven into the story, including sixteen-year-old Rose, who bears an uncanny resemblance to Westlake and is the daughter of the housekeeper. Other servants include a footman with a secret past, and a conniving lady’s maid to Westlake’s soon-to-be stepdaughter. Somerton is abuzz with planning for the nuptials which will unite Westlake and the wealthy Fiona, who has three children of her own. However, Ada is interested in more than parties and shopping. This time before World War I is an awakening of new technologies and political ideas. Women’s rights and the fight for Indian independence are gaining momentum, and Ada is excited by all of it. She yearns for a university education. But her father’s tenuous social and financial standing prompt Westlake to discourage educational pursuits and instead focus on her debut season which will hopefully result in a proper engagement.

 

This is a quick-paced story told from multiple points of view that will appeal to both romance and historical fiction readers. This first in the At Somerton series does an excellent job of mixing affairs of the heart, scandal, and glittery social occasions while still highlighting the developing social consciousness of the era, and those fighting to combat accepted class, race, and gender discrimination.

Maureen

 
 

Jon Scieszka…In the Old Abandoned Pickle Factory…With Today’s Hottest Authors

Who Done It?It’s not every anthology that can be described as a spirited game of Clue in literary form. Yet Who Done It?: an Investigation of Murder Most Foul, offers precisely that gift to readers. The scene is set in the Old Abandoned Pickle Factory, where the despicable Herman Mildew, the most callous, evil editor known to author, has just met his all too timely end. How did he perish? Who is responsible for this reprehensible, yet strangely justified crime? Author and editor Jon Scieszka presents the reader with an abundance of suspects: over eighty of the crème de la crème of teen and children’s authors.

 

Each had motive. Most had the means. Every last one has an alibi. Your task: Scour their alibis, discern truth from deceit, and glean clues about the real killer of the loathsome Herman Mildew. The formats, ranging from inner monologues and illustration to Twitter feeds and poetry, are as varied as the authors and artists they defend. 

 

Hilarious, smart, and as accessible to adults as to kids, Who Done It? is the perfect diversion for an idle hour, or even a few minutes of reading. The alibis are succinct, highly entertaining, and utterly addictive. A remarkably cohesive collaboration, it is important to bear in mind that the book features contributions from over eighty authors. For this reason, the anthology is best digested over multiple reading sessions. Readers are well advised to keep an eye out for subtle clues that pepper the suspects’ respective alibis. Together, these breadcrumbs may lead to some startling conclusions, as YOU, The Reader, and editor Jon Scieszka unravel the mystery of murder most foul.

Meghan

categories:

 
 

Haunted by the Past

Haunted by the Past

posted by:
March 18, 2013 - 7:45am

A Killer in the WindDan Champion was an undercover cop with the NYPD, on fire with ambition and with no regard for overtime caps or departmental boundaries. While combing through old case files, he discovers references to the “Fat Woman,” a mysterious, legendary monster, responsible for countless human trafficking purchases and subsequent murders. His obsession with finding her and the consequences of this personal mission are the driving force of A Killer in the Wind by Andrew Klavan.

 

A sting operation Champion has arranged to bring down the Fat Woman falls apart, resulting in the loss of his job and exile to a sheriff’s office in rural New York State. During his pursuit of the Fat Woman he took a street drug as a sleep aid, and he has since been haunted by ghosts and hallucinations. These visions raise many disturbing questions for Champion. How does he know the ghost boy’s name is Alexander? Why is the woman in his vision so familiar that he believes he could be in love with her? His life is turned upside down when a woman’s body pulled from the river turns out to be the very woman from his visions. The only words she utters before falling unconscious are “They are coming for us.”

 

Klavan is an international best-selling author, gifted in writing all things action and adventure. A Killer in the Wind is fast-moving and adrenaline-charged as the author utilizes bursts of short sentences and strategically placed repetition to create an effect that propels the story forward by matching pace with the action. This adult thriller is just a step darker than his teen series The Homelanders, the first of which has been optioned as a feature film. In both cases, he proves to be masterful at sweeping readers up in a mysterious suspense-filled novel and taking them on a wild ride to the stunning conclusion. 

 

Jeanne