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From Books to the Big Screen

Ender's GameMarvel Comics has issued the Ender’s Game graphic novel just in time for the movie. Based on the Hugo- and Nebula-awards winning classic science fiction novel by Orson Scott Card. The story follows Andrew "Ender" Wiggin as he enters battle school at 6 years old. Earth barely survived an invasion from the Formics, an insect-like alien race. Genetically bread to be a prodigy, Ender shows his aptitude for military strategy through his remarkable results in both the combat and mind games presented to him by Earth Command.  Rising through the ranks and entering Command School at an accelerated pace, Ender learns to rely on no one but himself and his own instincts, regardless of the rules. Can Ender save humanity from the impending war with the "Buggers"?  

 

This graphic novel is a compilation of the Ender’s Game: Battle School #s 1-5 and Ender’s Game: Command School #s 1-5 comics originally released monthly by Marvel beginning in October 2008. While the graphic novel format does not go into as much depth as the novel, it does stays true to the story. The movie adaptation, starring Harrison Ford, will be in theaters November 1.

Christina

 
 

The Dark Side of the Moon

The Dark Side of the Moon

posted by:
October 29, 2013 - 6:00am

The Shade of the MoonA meteor knocked the moon dangerously close to the earth and brought about tsunamis that wiped out whole continents and blocked the sun from reaching the planet, permanently changing everything. Susan Beth Pfeffer concludes her teen dystopian series with the fourth installment The Shade of the Moon. The Life As We Know It series follows the lives of a family and their friends as they grapple with the world they now live in and their struggle to survive as everything and everyone around them perishes.

 

Jon Evans and his remaining family have found themselves in Sexton, a heavily guarded community known as an “enclave” where the inhabitants are referred to as “Clavers.” His position in the prestigious town is always in jeopardy and his whereabouts are shrouded in suspicion. He, his stepmother Lisa and stepbrother Gabe gained entry to Sexton with passes given to them by another family. Jon takes advantage of the life he leads where he has access to purified air, education, health care and food while others work while exposed to chemicals in the air.

 

One wrong move can be fatal and no one is safe from the prying eyes of the officials who run Sexton. They will do whatever they need to do in order to maintain the safety and order of their community. The Shade of the Moon examines what the world could be like in the event of such a tragedy and the lengths people will go to save the ones they love.

Courtney

 
 

In the Spirit of Spook

Cover art for ZombelinaCover art for Vampirina BallerinaZombies and vampires have been all the rage lately, but not like this. Zombies who eat brains? Okay, sure. Vampires who suck blood? Makes sense. But vampires and zombies in tutus? Huh? Authors Kristyn Crow and Anne Marie Pace bring to life two adorably spooky characters with wonderfully supportive families.

 

Zombelina has a love of dance that she just can’t contain. She twirls through the house from one dance to the next. To her pleasant surprise, her mother says it’s time that she becomes a true ballerina. She takes her shopping for all of the ballet accoutrement and even signs her up for lessons. When she begins her class, it’s plain to see that Zombelina may be a little different from the other girls, but she practices hard and gains praise for her unique spin on ballet. Will the practice pay off for her big recital? Crow uses rhyming in combination with Molly Idle’s illustrations to create a story wholly unique. This book is a clear choice for any young reader with a passion for dance or who is looking for something to get them in spooky spirits.

 

Another book to go with the theme is Anne Marie Pace’s second installment of Vampirina Ballerina, titled Vampirina Ballerina Hosts a Sleepover. In this story, Vampirina shows just what to do to create the very best sleepover. It’s not all about work, though, as the little girls come over and frolic in this uncharacteristic house filled with mummies, monsters and spiders, oh my. Not everyone enjoys the slumber party when one little girl is spooked by an unexpected mummy appearance. Will Vampirina be able to save the party she worked so hard to plan?

 

Other picture books to celebrate the spooky season are Bone Soup by Cambria Evans and Gibbus Moony Wants to Bite You! by Leslie Muir.

Randalee

 
 

Little Truths About the Big Picture

Little Truths About the Big Picture

posted by:
October 25, 2013 - 6:00am

Cover art for The Truth of MeFrom Newbery Award-winner Patricia MacLachlan comes The Truth of Me, a new classic delivered in a deceptively simplistic format. Robbie — he hates to be called Robert — is the only child of two brilliant but distant musicians. He knows his parents care for him, but also that the music has and always will come first. Fortunately, Robbie is also the beloved grandchild of one very quirky lady...who just may have a special gift when it comes to communicating with wild animals.

 

Maddy may be a little unconventional as grandmothers go — she’s even been known to serve donuts for dinner — but to Robbie there could be none better. More than a grandmother, Maddy is Robbie’s best friend — well, apart from his dog, Ellie — and he always looks forward to the time they spend together. During the summer that his parents’ quartet is touring in Europe, Robbie’s stay with Maddy will open his eyes to new truths; about his grandmother, about his family and even about himself.

 

A poignant tale and understated to a fault, The Truth of Me is a story of the little truths about ourselves that help us see the big picture. On its surface, it's a simple portrait of a young boy, his grandmother and his dog. At its heart, it's a story of self-actualization and love. Recommended for thoughtful young readers and anyone who enjoys gentle teaching tales. Fans of Kevin Henkes’ Junonia, in particular, may be drawn to The Truth of Me.

Meghan

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Some Sweet Day

Some Sweet Day

posted by:
October 24, 2013 - 6:00am

Cover art ofr The Book of SomedayDianne Dixon’s second novel, The Book of Someday, links three seemingly unrelated characters in an intriguing story of betrayal, love, loss and maternal protection. Livvi is a successful author with an abusive past. She has recurring nightmares about a woman in a silver dress, but has no idea why or what the dreams mean. Recently, she has fallen in love for the first time but is confused by her boyfriend’s evasiveness and family secrets.

 

Micah is a talented photographer who has recently found out she has breast cancer. As a result, she is on a cross-country journey to try to make amends for past wrongs.

 

AnnaLee is a housewife with a young daughter. Her husband loves her, but he is a disappointment to her career-wise and their financial struggles have further strained their marriage.

 

Told from the alternating perspectives of these three characters, Dixon slowly peels back the layers of the story to reveal the interconnectedness. There is also introspection and self-discovery as each woman matures and better understands the gray areas of their past and present relationships with others.

 

Dixon is a screenwriter and employs brisk writing, succinct dialogue and concise descriptions to create context and keep the story moving forward. The complex characters and plot twists contribute to a dramatic tale which will keep readers up late at night to unravel the mystery. Fans of Jodi Picoult or Kristin Hannah will appreciate the unique ending, which answers some questions but doesn’t tie everything up too neatly. Highly recommended as a book club selection, or as a good couch read on a chilly fall day.
 

Melanie

 
 

Burning Down the House

Burning Down the House

posted by:
October 23, 2013 - 6:00am

Cover art for Coming CleanAs a child, author Kimberly Rae Miller would pray that her home would catch on fire. Her prayer was answered but, to her horror, it came with some unforeseen consequences. In her memoir, Coming Clean, Miller writes about her experiences growing up as the only child of parents who were hoarders.
 

Miller makes it clear that hoarding isn’t just a messy home with too much clutter. Hoarding à la the Miller parents means never throwing anything away. It means online shopping so obsessively that delivered but unopened packages are stacked to the ceiling. It means sleeping on the edge of a mattress otherwise piled with junk, never opening the refrigerator since it contains moldy sludge and showering at the gym since to call in a plumber to repair leaking pipes would mean being reported to social services. Yes, it means moving to a new home to escape the detritus in the old house.
 

It would be easy to dismiss this book as piggybacking on the odd appeal of the popular reality TV show Hoarders. The descriptions of the Miller family’s living conditions are shocking and sad. Miller also relates the shame she felt as a child, colluding with her parents to present a picture of normalcy, and the guilt, too, after the wished-for house fire resulted in the deaths of her beloved pets. Yet, this story is multi-layered, and Miller is clear that she was raised by loving and intelligent parents who encouraged and supported her in academic and social pursuits. Coming Clean reminds us that imperfect people and good parenting are not mutually exclusive, and our circumstances do not define who we are. Visit Miller at her blog, TheKimChallenge, where she writes about food, fitness, perspective and love.

Lori

 
 

A Slave Narrative Lost and Found

Cover art for Twelve Years a SlaceIn school, we all learned about Harriet Beecher Stowe’s novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin, but there was another book published around the same time that had an important impact on the discussion of slavery in America. That book was Solomon Northup’s memoir 12 Years a Slave. Northup was born a free man and lived most of his life in New York. In 1841, he was lured to Washington, D.C. where he was beaten, drugged and sold into slavery. For the next 12 years, he was a slave on a series of plantations in Louisiana until his family was able to find him and bring him home to New York in 1853. 12 Years a Slave is his unflinching firsthand account of what he experienced and witnessed during that time.

 

When it was published in 1853, Northup’s memoir became a bestseller, selling over 30,000 copies. After the Civil War, the book was out-of-print for many years. It was rediscovered by two scholars in the 1960s and reprinted in 1968. Now, it has been adapted into a film that brings the horrors of Northup’s experience to the big screen. Like many of us, the film’s director, Steve McQueen, was surprised when his partner brought the book to his attention. He writes, “The book blew both our minds: the epic range, the details, the adventure, the horror and the humanity. The book read like a film script, ready to be shot. I could not believe that I had never heard of this book.”

 

The movie, which the New York Post calls “brutally powerful and emotionally devastating,” is already generating Oscar buzz. The film’s A-list cast includes Chiwetel Ejiofor, Michael Fassbender, Benedict Cumberbatch, Brad Pitt, Paul Giamatti and Alfre Woodard. The trailer is available here.

Beth

 
 

Trusting a Memory

Trusting a Memory

posted by:
October 22, 2013 - 6:00am

Cover art for FracturedIn a world where nothing is what it seems and no one is safe to speak out against a tyrannical government for fear of disappearing forever, Kyla must be careful of the questions she asks and of every move she makes. In Fractured, book two of Teri Terry’s Slated trilogy, teenage Kyla has recovered some of the memories of who she was before she became a “Slated” and had her memory wiped clean of her past. Kyla is desperately looking for clues as to what happened to her friend Ben who disappeared after attempting to remove his “Levo,” a GPS and monitoring device fitted onto the wrists of all “Slateds” to keep tabs on them. Kyla fears that Ben is dead, along with so many others discarded by the “Lorders," those in charge of enforcing the laws of society.
 

When Kyla reconnects with Nico, a face from her past, she begins to “remember” things. But are they really her memories or imposters? Each step Kyla takes only leads to more questions, more danger and still people are missing. Kyla can’t even be certain if finding out who she was before she was slated will solve her problems or make them worse, but she knows one thing — she at least has to try.
 

Terry’s second installment to her trilogy is a fast paced read, aimed toward readers who enjoyed dystopian series such as Suzanne Collins’ The Hunger Games and Susan Beth Pfeffer’s Life As We Knew It.

Courtney

 
 

Helter Skelter, and Everything Before and After

Cover art for Manson“The paranoia was fulfilled” – that’s how Joan Didion described the murders carried out in 1969 by Charles Manson and his band of devoted followers known as “The Family.” Translation? The late sixties were already a time of intense political change and civil unrest. Throw in sensationalized murders and an equally dramatic trial, and this period was officially the craziest and most unsettling in American history, no matter one’s political or ideological leanings. In Manson: The Life and Times of Charles Manson, Jeff Guinn traces the hardscrabble origins of the boy who grew up to become the infamous cult leader and murderer. Although Manson did have a somewhat unstable home life, he exaggerated or fabricated childhood tales of woe to win sympathy and devotion from his followers. In the true fashion of an “opportunistic sociopath,” as Guinn describes him, Manson used skills obtained in prison, like Dale Carnegie’s popular How to Win Friends and Influence People program, to manipulate followers and bring them under his control. His teachings that “Helter Skelter”, the end of an orderly American society, was close at hand led to the “Tate murders,” where pregnant actress Sharon Tate and four others were brutally killed. Additionally, his followers murdered several other people before and after this most infamous crime.  

 

Guinn does an excellent job alternating national and world history with Manson’s development, meticulously chronicling his childhood and adolescence in and out of reform schools, his young adulthood as a petty repeat criminal, and his time in Haight-Ashbury, the neighborhood that was the epicenter for the darker side of the hippie movement where Manson did much of his initial recruiting. Those who enjoyed Vincent Bugliosi’s Helter Skelter: The True Story of the Manson Murders will appreciate this in-depth account of these suspenseful and chilling crimes. As James Lee Burke writes in his cover review: “Hang on, reader. This is a rip-roaring ride you won’t forget.”
 

Melanie

 
 

Hard Knox

Hard Knox

posted by:
October 21, 2013 - 6:55am

Cover art for CartwheelAmanda Knox is back in the news again with her retrial underway, and Cartwheel by Jennifer duBois couldn’t have come at a better time. duBois maintains that her book isn’t an actual account of Knox’s experience, but the story was inspired by the case.

 

Much like Knox, Lily studies abroad for a semester, though her experience is in Argentina and not Italy. Lily and another student, Katy, live with a host family. Initially, Lily is enthralled with her new surroundings in Buenos Aires as she goes to class and people-watches at cafés, but eventually she becomes bored and takes on a job at a local bar. After Katy is found stabbed to death, Lily, a coworker and her boyfriend are all implicated in the murder, and Lily is taken to jail.

 

The story is told from the perspectives of several key characters. The reader first sees Lily’s point of view as she arrives in Buenos Aires and starts to explore her new surroundings. The perspective then changes to her parents, the prosecuting attorney and Lily’s boyfriend, Sebastian.

 

Readers will feel like jurors at Lily’s trial. The conclusion to this story is more resolute than Knox’s, but the reader is still left to make up his or her own mind, and no two readers will have the same experience. Interested in a reading about the real Amanda Knox? Checkout her new memoir titled Waiting to be Heard.

Randalee