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posted by: December 3, 2015 - 7:00pm

Cover art for MARTiansImagine a future where new high school graduates are funneled into one of two life options: prison (that's where they'll end up anyway) or a job at one of two superstores, AllMART or Q-Mart. This is the premise of Blythe Woolston’s MARTians, which follows Zoë Zindleman, a teen who is an unexpected early graduate of her now-closed efficiency high school.


Zoë’s homeroom technician explains that once upon a time a student like her might go to college to prepare for a professional position, but that was then and this is now. She’s lucky to have a job referral for both stores. Home life is a problem, because her house has been on the market for a long time, and so have all the other abandoned, looted dwellings on their cul-de-sac. And now that Zoë has job security, her mother, AnnaMom has decided to move away without her.


Lucky for Zoë, she meets Timmer, a fellow graduate who has had the advantage of working for AllMART for several months now. He’s also on his own, and he helps her navigate the world of the newly independent. He offers her a place to live at an abandoned strip mall, which serves as home to a variety of scrappy misfits. Of course, she could choose to live in the AllMART dormitory—after all, AllMART acts in loco parentis for its employees. AllMART is so much more than a job, her personal human resources manager reminds her. It’s all she can do to learn the departments within the vast store, all the while encouraged to remember “Your smile is the AllMART welcome mat.”


Although published as a teen novel, this dystopian satire features the kind sophisticated ideas and sharp prose found in adult science fiction classics. Savvy readers will notice references to Ray Bradbury's The Martian Chronicles, which influenced this cautionary tale of a future that leaves superstores at the center of everyone’s existence. Equally funny and chilling, MARTians is a novel to share.


Sit! Stay! Speak!

posted by: December 3, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Sit! Stay! Speak!A wounded young woman picks up the pieces of her shattered future to start a new life in a small Southern town in Sit! Stay! Speak! by Annie England Noblin. Adelaide owns an antique furniture business with her fiancé, Jonah, and is busily planning the final details of their wedding when tragedy strikes. While rushing to an appointment, Jonah is killed on the interstate. For two years, she drifts in a daze, until her aunt dies and bequeaths Addie her home in the tiny town of Eunice, Arkansas.  


Reminiscing about blissful summers spent with her aunt, Addie decides to take a walk down to the levee. She is shocked to find that the lovely picnic spot on the Mississippi River has become neglected and strewn with garbage. Even more surprising is that the garbage moves of its own accord. An investigation of a discarded garbage bag reveals a pit bull puppy beaten, shot, and struggling to survive. Addie rushes to the local vet hoping to save the dog’s life, and in the end, finds the secret of saving her own.  


This debut novel is a promising start for animal rescuer and author Annie Noblin. The characters are quirky, entertaining and unforgettable. Noblin manages to convey Addie’s heartache without excessive sentimentality. The author subtly explores how the simplest decisions can have major ramifications for ourselves and those around us. As Addie rebuilds her house, she also rebuilds her life, and uncovers some surprises along the way. Whether or not you are a dog lover, if you enjoy romance, small town life or just a great story, Sit! Stay! Speak! is a sure winner. 



Deep South

posted by: December 2, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Deep SouthVeteran novelist and travel writer Paul Theroux has spent 50 years traversing the globe. In his latest book, Deep South: Four Seasons on Back Roads, he trades the rickety rail cars of his African and Asian adventures for the dusty, sunbaked, story-rich rural back roads of Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Arkansas and South Carolina. He calls it a “coming and going” type of book that beckoned him to return time and again. Indeed, he spent over a year and a half traveling by car in the south where only one person had ever heard his name or read any of his previous books. “Anonymity is freedom,” he said.


Theroux provides an intensely evocative look at the complex history of a region, rich in so many ways, abandoned and scarred in others. This is not a story about romantic cobblestone streets, touristy historic districts and prosperous cities. It is about what happens when manufacturing plants close up. It is about the shocking disparity of aid to places where the poverty rivals third world countries. Theroux searched out the cohesive fabric of the region and had hundreds of encounters with those who shared beloved interests, like gun shows, church-going and football. He frequented barber shops for conversations. He explored southern literary voices to understand history.


Known for an eye for detail and local color, Theroux is at his best trying to capture the mood of the places he visited. He does make assumptions in this thought-provoking, dialect-rich narrative that may leave readers asking questions or even shaking their heads. In the end, this 464-page travelogue by the author of the classic The Great Railway Bazaar may have readers wondering whether Theroux’s South is a place they recognize.



A Year in the Life of a Complete and Total Genius

posted by: December 2, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for A Year in the Life of a Complete and Total GeniusA Year in the Life of a Complete and Total Genius by Stacey Matson is the story of aspiring writer Arthur Bean. If you had to pick just one word to describe our young hero, that word would NOT be “humble.” Told largely through school writing assignments, journal entries, and emails, many of the laughs come from Arthur’s pompous and defiant attitude.


Arthur has no doubt that he will handily win this year’s short story competition — in addition to writing for the school newspaper, starring in the school play, and just generally being a seventh grader. His attention is further diverted by his crush on his writing partner Kennedy, and being forced to tutor his nemesis Robbie. On top of all that, his mother died recently, his father isn’t handling it well, and Arthur feels isolated from their extended family. It’s certainly not an easy time to be Arthur Bean. And it’s not surprising that he develops a crippling case of writer’s block.


Arthur’s confidence doesn’t waver despite never writing a single word of his short story. When he makes a choice that is even more duplicitous than usual, readers will wonder how he will justify his actions and get himself out of this tricky situation.


Fans of Gordon Korman’s Swindle and Jeff Kinney’s Diary of a Wimpy Kid series will enjoy Arthur’s antics. A sequel has already been published in the author’s native Canada.


Ann Tenna

posted by: December 1, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Ann TennaIn Ann Tenna, Marisa Marchetto (author of the autobiography, Cancer Vixen) offers a meditation on how people shape their own realities — and are shaped by them — and disguises it as a graphic novel about a gossip columnist who finally receives a heaping dish of her own karmic garbage.


Ann is a gossip columnist to the nth power. She is a horrible person to everyone she knows — other than her best friend, Miu, her boyfriend, Zim, and her father, girl-product peddler extraordinaire A. M. Tenna. Because she has been a terrible individual in every other lifetime she has been granted, Super-Ann (Ann at her very best self) has super-kicked regular Ann back to Earth for her final “incarceration” — her very last chance to be a kind human and a positive force in the world. Good luck with that, Ann.


She starts as a breech birth, and events in her personal life only go downhill. Fast-forward three decades, and Ann is fixing to get her humanitarian award — until she is publically humiliated. And then she dies. Almost. When her consciousness wakes in a whole new plane, Super-Ann (in her magical, sparkly, impossible platform shoes) takes the elbow-length gloves off and forces regular, snotty Ann to become the broadcaster the Universe intended her to be. Unless regular Ann can stop her.



You Don’t Have to Like Me

posted by: December 1, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for You Don't Have to Like MeAlida Nugent is a writer, blogger, and self-proclaimed feminist. However, her journey to feminism has not always been easy. Nugent shares her shrewd observations and humorous personal anecdotes on how she came to claim her feminism in her newest book, You Don’t Have to Like Me.


Nugent’s book is both a memoir and a collection of essays. Each essay shows how feminism has had an important part in shaping her life, from the moments before she was born and her parents found out they were having a girl to the present day as she navigates life as a 20-something writer. Nugent admits that she was reluctant to label herself as a feminist, and that she understands that it’s difficult for other girls to label themselves as feminists because of the negative stigma surrounding the word. But as Nugent says, “Feminism isn’t wrong. Feminism is important.”


Nugent’s book helps readers understand that “feminism” is not a scary word, and remains just as relevant today as it did 50 or even 100 years ago. Although we are making strides towards gender equality, the fact that labeling oneself as a supporter of gender equality has negative connotations shows that we are still quite far from where we need to be. Nugent’s essays capture the sobering truths of women’s inequality with passion and relatability.


Readers will laugh out loud at the absurdity of some of the situations Nugent has found herself in, and then realize that the absurdity is not in the situation, but at our misunderstanding of how much we truly need feminism in our everyday lives. Nugent’s writing is approachable and entertaining and gives young adult readers the fresh perspective on modern-day feminism they need. For more of Alida Nugent’s writing, check out her previous book, Don’t Worry, It Gets Worse or follow her blog, The Frenemy.


The Murder Road

posted by: November 30, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Murder RoadInspector Ben Cooper must wade through old grudges to solve a baffling murder in The Murder Road by Stephen Booth.


There’s only one road providing access to the tiny hamlet of Shawhead, and Mac Kelsey’s abandoned truck is blocking the route. As outraged villagers demand action, Inspector Cooper must locate Mac the missing driver. There’s blood on the driver’s manifest, and a pool of blood on the cab’s floor. Evidence shows someone jumped from the bridge onto the roof of the truck cab. Unearthing Mac’s fate becomes a trek over fields and moors and memories of bygone days. Struggling with demons from his own past, Cooper faces some tough decisions about his future.  


This is the 15th book in the Barry Award-winning Cooper and Fry mysteries, but this work is a great introduction to a consistently quality series. Booth weaves a tale as enigmatic and murky as the moors themselves. Inspector Cooper is a relentless pursuer of details, and it is Booth’s careful weaving of suspicion, pursuit, suspense and evidence that produces such a gripping mystery. Fans of Peter Robinson and Elizabeth George will sure to be pleased with this original police procedural.



You're Never Weird on the Internet (almost)

posted by: November 30, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for You're Never Weird on the InternetSince uploading the first episode of her breakout web series to the Internet, Felicia Day has maintained an omnipotent online presence. Fortunately for all the nerds and geeks of the world, she found the willpower to minimize her browser long enough to share her experiences in her memoir You’re Never Weird on the Internet (almost). And according to her twitter, she was so stoked to wear that dress. I would be too.


In You’re Never Weird, Day reminisces about her mother’s unique methods of homeschooling, her countless hours of practicing to become a violin virtuoso and her first obsession with a video game called Ultima. Her uncanny power to dedicate herself to a worthy cause aided her in creating a semi-autobiographical web series called The Guild, which debuted in 2007 and represented a notable portion of the initial traffic on a little site known as YouTube. Reading about Day’s life makes every scene exponentially funnier because readers will be able to attribute her characters’ bizarre quirks and obsessions to things she experienced as her online persona — or in reality, but that’s never as fun.


Day also includes a discourse on the recent movement #GamerGate, in which she details how she felt about the initial scandal and dealt with the brushfire of hate that whipped her way as the online trolls carried out their misguided crusades. Curiously, she didn’t spin many tales from the sets of Buffy and Supernatural, but there are plenty of stories in You’re Never Weird to keep readers laughing as they turn the pages.


Whether readers recognize her from the commercials she did in the mid-2000s to keep her World of Warcraft addiction fueled, or know her as Cyd Sherman — aka Codex the Cleric — Felicia Day’s memoir is a well-written, highly entertaining read that’s perfect for anyone who wears the title of “geek” or “nerd” with pride.




101 Easy Asian Recipes

posted by: November 27, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for 101 Easy Asian RecipesAs a serious home cook who loves to read cookbooks, I was excited to get my hands on 101 Easy Asian Recipes, by Peter Meehan and the editors of Lucky Peach. I’m a longtime fan of Lucky Peach magazine, a quarterly journal that focuses on food writing of all kinds. Their first cookbook is very approachable. It features simple, clear instructions, plenty of procedural drawings (like how to properly fill and seal a dumpling) and glossy color photographs of finished dishes. Meehan admits that “Asian” is a wide catch-all term — for example, there are no Indian recipes in the book — and they’re not necessarily aiming for authenticity. A recipe for “mall chicken” is a nod to the sauce-doused chicken chunks sampled on toothpicks at nearly every food court you’ve ever visited. This version is baked rather than fried, but is no less craveable.


A trip to an Asian supermarket to stock your pantry is a must as you’ll need things you probably won’t find at your local supermarket. Not only does the book provide a frequently used ingredient list, but there are photographic spreads of the actual items. This helps remove any possible confusion, as many of the ingredients may be unfamiliar. These include things like black vinegar, fish sauce, sesame oil, sambal oelek, dashi and white pepper. Recipes call for all types of noodles, from ramen and udon to gluten-free Korean glass noodles (made from sweet potato starch) and rice sticks.


Meehan has a great sense of humor that shines through in the notes, the recipes are easy to follow and the results are impressive. I’ve made several dishes with great success in the last couple of weeks, including a smashed cucumber salad with chili, cilantro and peanuts; braised baby bok choy with oyster sauce and crispy garlic; and homemade “dollar dumplings” with dipping sauce. Borrow 101 Easy Asian Recipes now and you’ll likely buy your own copy later.



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