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Bedtime Stories for the Shore

posted by: August 8, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for The StormCover art for MayaWhether you’ve just been down the ocean or you’re anticipating your next trip, here are three seaside bedtime stories to share with your kids — especially if they’re fans of Ponyo.

 

The protagonist of The Storm can’t wait to go to the beach tomorrow with his parents! But one of Japan’s infamous monsoons threatens to douse their plans. Can his family weather the storm through the night or will their plans be rained out? Akiko Miyakoshi’s masterful charcoal illustrations depict this story of anticipation and overcoming fear with the same finesse as fellow illustrators Chris Van Allsburg and Daniel Miyares.

 

Maya by Mahak Jain is having trouble sleeping as well. Troubled by the dark when the power goes out, her mother comforts her with the story of the first banyan tree. Through this story and her dreamy imaginings, Maya learns how to transform her fears and overcome the sadness plaguing her from a recent loss. Elly MacKay’s ethereal cut-paper diorama illustrations, reminiscent of Lotte Reiniger’s Adventures of Prince Achmed, set the perfect tone in their depiction of Maya’s dream world.

 

Finally, be lulled to sleep by Anne Hunter’s onomatopoetic depiction of animals’ lullabies in Cricket Song. As the sun sets across the ocean, two worlds comingle as the diurnal creatures settle into their beds and nocturnal creatures start to wake. This understated story captures a sense of the earth’s orbit, starting in a forest in the Pacific Northwest and ending on an island in the South Seas. The interchange of the animals across the world makes for a tranquil procession as the two children in the book (and your own) drift off into slumberland.

Liz

Liz

 
 

Read Like TED

posted by: August 3, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for GritCover art for OriginalsThe first thing I do after watching a really inspiring TED Talk? Search BCPL’s catalog to see if the speaker has written a book. Fortunately, TED presenters are a prolific literary bunch.

 

TED, whose slogan is “Ideas Worth Spreading,” was founded in 1984 and became an annual conference series in 1990. First emphasizing technology, entertainment and design, TED now includes talks on a broad range of subjects, including the academic, scientific and cultural. Talks are now limited to 18 minutes and over 2,400 have been posted online since 2006.    

 

Recently published books by popular presenters include Angela Duckworth’s Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance, which explores the question of why some people succeed while others fail, and Adam Grant’s Originals: How Non-Conformists Move the World, about successful men and women who have rejected conformity and flourished in diverse industries.

 

If you’ve ever dreamed about presenting your own TED Talk — or would just like some tips for improving your public speaking — TED President Chris Anderson reveals behind-the-scenes details in his new book TED Talks: The Official TED Guide to Public Speaking. Also be sure to check out Talk Like TED: The 9 Public-Speaking Secrets of the World's Top Minds by public speaking coach Carmine Gallo who promises more dynamic presentations — and more confident presenters.   

 

TED’s 20 most popular talks of all time can be found online and include such authors as Ken Robinson, Amy Cuddy and Simon Sinek.

 


 
 

Sleeping Giants

posted by: August 1, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Sleeping GiantsSleeping Giants by Sylvain Neuvel is a captivating new science fiction novel about a giant metal robot whose parts are strewn across different parts of the earth and the physicist determined to uncover its origins and purpose. Dr. Rose Franklin encountered the robot firsthand when she was a young girl. She was riding her bike when, suddenly, she fell through the ground and into the palm of a giant metal hand. Rose slowly learns that the hand is just one of many robot parts being discovered around the world, but it’s not clear what these robots were meant for. Making human lives easier? Destroying human lives? The story is told in journal entries, interviews and transcripts, so the reader feels the suspense of trying to piece the story together. Each interviewer and interviewee shares a new perspective to this mystery, and the results unfold at a thrilling pace.

 

This novel is engaging and moves quickly. Its realistic premise makes it a great read for fans of The Martian and science fiction lovers. Although the scientific and robotic concepts are realistic, the language and style of the story are easily digestible. Neuvel has an education in linguistics and a background as a software engineer, so his story is fun to both read and speculate about. It's the first book in a new series, so readers who enjoy this book can look forward to the next installment Walking Gods, coming out in April 2017.

 


 
 

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child

posted by: July 31, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Harry Potter and the Cursed ChildIt’s finally here! Harry Potter and the Cursed Child arrives today, and fans who have waited to learn more about their favorites will devour this script of the play based on an original new story by J. K. Rowling, Jack Thorne and John Tiffany. The Cursed Child is set 19 years after the seventh and final book in the series, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, and Harry Potter is now (gulp!) 37 with his own family. Harry Potter first entered our lives 19 years ago with Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone and since 1997, all titles in the series have sold more than 450 million copies and been adapted into eight films.

 

Harry is an overworked employee of the Ministry of Magic, a husband and father of three school-age children. Harry and wife Ginny, accompanied by old friends Ron and Hermione, watch as their children set off from King’s Cross for a new term at Hogwarts. While Harry struggles with his past, his youngest son Albus must deal with the burden of being the child of a legend. He is unpopular and living under the shadow of his famous father, but Albus feels he has one true friend — Scorpius Malfoy, the son of his father’s arch enemy, Draco. But is Albus, as Harry suspects, being taken advantage of? And what about the persistently circulating rumor that Scorpius is really the child of the dark wizard, Lord Voldemort?

 

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child is one play presented in two parts. The production has won five-star reviews from critics, with one describing it as "a game-changing production.” The play opened last night at the Palace Theatre in London’s West End, and Daily Telegraph critic Dominic Cavendish raved, "British theatre hasn't known anything like it for decades and I haven't seen anything directly comparable in all my reviewing days."

 


 
 

Missing, Presumed

posted by: July 27, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Missing, PresumedWhen Detective Sergeant Manon Bradshaw arrives on the scene of the crime, the door is hanging open, there is an abandoned coat in the foyer and broken glass and blood splatter in the kitchen. These are the only clues to track in Missing, Presumed by Susie Steiner. The victim is Ph.D. candidate Edith Hind, daughter of eminent surgeon Sir Ian Hind. Sir Ian is highly connected, but despite pressure from the Home Secretary, there are very few clues to follow, and time is running out for Edith and the Cambridgeshire Police.

 

Manon’s frustration grows as the first 72 hours — considered the most vital in a missing person’s case — seep away. As the press circles the scene like vultures, devouring the most salacious details of Edith’s love life, Manon’s team scrambles to gather more clues. With the clock ticking and pressure on every side, Manon must delve the deepest secrets of a very private prominent family to unearth what really happened to Edith.

 

Steiner uses multiple perspectives from different characters to create a wholly believable story with psychological depth. She develops the characters through their distinct eccentricities; Manon listens to a police scanner to ease herself to sleep, her colleague Davy peppers police jargon throughout his conversations and the missing Edith can recycle anything into an art project. One revelation after another brings you to a conclusion you do not see coming. This police procedural has all the elements of a riveting psychological thriller. Missing, Presumed is a beautifully written novel by an up-and-coming writer.

 


 
 

The Wild Robot

posted by: July 25, 2016 - 7:00am

The Wild RobotThe Wild Robot is Peter Brown’s first work for middle-grade readers, and this notable picture book author and illustrator has given us a delightful story that is sure to become a classic.

 

A hurricane rages offshore, and somewhere at sea a vessel containing hundreds of identical crates sinks. Its cargo is mostly lost beneath the waves. A handful of crates are destroyed by waves smashing them into the rocky island cliff. One solitary crate is washed up onto the cliff’s edge so forcefully it breaks apart, and miraculously the robot inside is unharmed.

 

A curious gang of sea otters activates the ROZZUM unit 7134, and a robot called Roz wakes for the first time to finds herself marooned on an island.

 

Now, Roz must struggle to survive in this wild place. Unsurprisingly, the animals are terrified of this strange monster in their midst. They avoid her and attack her until she hides away. She certainly isn’t programmed for survival, but she is programmed to learn. Disguised as a rock, Roz observes the world around her. She sits patiently and watches tadpoles turning to frogs, mushrooms magically appearing, foxes hunting hares, ocean waves crashing against the coast. She begins to learn the languages of the creatures on the island.

 

By accident, Roz finds herself caring for a tiny gosling. As she becomes this little bird’s mother, she finds a place in the animal community. She must rely on older geese to help teach her how to take care of her gosling, and the beavers to build her a suitable house for the two of them. The animals on the island learn that Roz is kind and happy to help her neighbors, and a new kind of community is formed.

 

This peace can’t last though. Like the other animals, Roz is subject to the changing seasons. She has to find a way to endure conditions robots weren’t built for. Also, the manufacturers who created Roz are searching for every last robot they lost.

 

This wonderful book has everything readers could ask for — an action-packed plot as well as heartwarming characters readers won’t soon forget. While Brown does offer up a very accessible book for young readers, there are also some weighty themes such as motherhood, environmental concerns and the question of what it is to be human, making it a great book for families to share.

 

If you enjoy this title, be sure to check out Pax by Sara Pennypacker.


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Harrow County

posted by: July 20, 2016 - 7:00am

Harrow CountyStrange things are happening in Harrow County. Unrecognizable shadows roost in the barns. A boy’s skin is found hanging in the woods, shed like a snake. And young Emmy is starting to remind  the townsfolk of someone they tried hard to forget.

 

Harrow County, the new series by writer Cullen Bunn and artist Tyler Cook, is a coming-of-age tale told with the moody evocations of a campfire horror story. At times both wondrous and horrifying, it centers on a teenage girl’s journey to discover the darkness and magic of the supernatural.

 

Although she doesn’t know it, Emmy is the reincarnation of Hester Beck, a powerful witch the townsfolk burned at the stake before Emmy was born. In her time, Hester created countless haints (a southern colloquialism for restless spirits) that terrorized the town but now look to Emmy for guidance. On top of that, her neighbors suspect that Emmy’s new powers mean she’ll be just as bad as Hester. To survive them both, Emmy must learn to find humanity in the creatures of the woods.

 

Tyler Crook’s vivid watercolors bring a kaleidoscopic warmth to the southern ghost story. Even his most unsettling creatures move with such character that they become sympathetic, such as the lonely minotaur the Abandoned or the Skinless Boy who is introduced as the most disturbing creature in the book but slowly becomes as friendly and approachable as a pet dog.

 

With this comic next in line for a small screen adaptation, fans of other dark comic adapted TV such as the recent hits Outcast and Preacher will want to take note. The creators have even made their own soundtrack — such is their dedication to giving readers the willies.


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