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You and Me and Him

posted by: October 7, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for You and Me and HimTwo best friends fall for the same guy in Kris Dinnison’s new teen fiction novel You and Me and Him, but it’s not the same old story you may have heard.

 

Meet Maggie: she’s funny. She’s snarky. She’s smart. She’s a social outcast because of her weight. Meet Nash: he’s funny. He’s snarky. He’s smart. He’s also a social outcast, but because he’s gay. Because of their social statuses, Maggie and Nash have been inseparable since elementary school, helping each other weather the pains of childhood and adolescence. They crush on the same boys and shake off the same bullies in their tiny town near Seattle.

 

Enter Tom: the new boy. Charming, friendly and good-looking, Tom gravitated towards Maggie and Nash from the day he entered their school. As he hangs out at the record store where Maggie works (and where Nash gets all the gossip), Tom’s presence starts to peck away at the deep bond between these two BFFs when it is apparent that he may have feelings for only one of them. It doesn’t help matters that Kayla, the mean girl who ruined Maggie’s middle school years, seems determined to suddenly become friends again. It’s a lot of emotional upheaval to deal with. Add in the pressure from the adults in their lives to conform to what their standards of being “perfect” might be, and Maggie and Nash see what they thought was their unshakable friendship start to unravel.

 

The beauty of this novel lies in the character of Maggie: relatable and realistic, she’s not one of the cookie cutter heroines that typically populate the teen fiction genre. As she gains confidence throughout the story, it’s easy to root for her to not just have a happily-ever-after, but actually stand on her own.

 

Fans of novels like The Perks of Being a Wallflower will enjoy this story of teenage friendship and all its ups and downs.

 


 
 

Revised: November 18, 2015