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Sister, Sister

posted by: June 14, 2013 - 7:45am

The View From Penthouse BTwo years ago, sisters Margot and Gwen’s lives were dramatically changed by the departures of their husbands. In The View from Penthouse B, Elinor Lipman shares the story of these sisters whose marital situations were altered by wildly different circumstances. Gwen’s husband Edwin died suddenly but peacefully in his sleep. Despite the best intentions of family and friends, Gwen has not felt the need or desire to start dating. Margot’s husband, Charles, an OB/GYN, might as well have died when he was arrested and jailed for fraud. His crime: providing infertility treatments the old-fashioned way. Margot immediately divorced Charles, but managed to secure a good deal of his money. She bought a beautiful Village penthouse and started living the high life. Then Bernie Madoff happened, and with it came Margot’s reversal of fortune. Younger and bossier sister Betsy took one look at her two floundering sisters and recommended they share the penthouse. This cohabitation would provide companionship and also made good financial sense.  


Margot and Gwen are compatible roommates, but their ever-tightening wallets dictate the need for a third roomie. Margot finds Anthony, an unemployed financial analyst, single, gay, and in his twenties. He’s a breath of fresh air in their stagnant lives, and boy does he bake fabulous cupcakes! Gwen finally decides to venture back into the dating scene and places online personal ads. The responses she receives from prospective suitors headline subsequent chapters and are just one example of Lipman’s sharp wit. At the same time, Charles is paroled and moves into an efficiency downstairs for the sole purpose of winning Margot back. The sisters’ lives are finally getting interesting with dates, dinners with Charles, and an introduction to Chaz, the son from his scandalous “treatment.”  Lipman creates another comedic and poignant gem with this sister story about love, forgiveness, and renewal in middle age. Once again, Lipman makes it clear why so many have dubbed her our modern Jane Austen.




Revised: June 14, 2013