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Miracleman: The Golden Age

posted by: May 25, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for MiraclemanAfter 30 years of legal troubles kept it from seeing print, Miracleman: The Golden Age by Neil Gaiman and Mark Buckingham is a lost classic that is well worth the wait. For those unfamiliar, Miracleman was the first “serious” superhero, who began the “grim ‘n gritty” style of comics in the 1980’s.This was a time when writers started asking what would happen if superheroes existed in the real world. The answer was usually violent. But for a comic that came from the same era as cynical classics like Watchmen and The Dark Knight Returns, Neil Gaiman’s Miracleman is surprisingly optimistic.

 

The story of Miracleman is basically about a Superman knockoff who discovers that he’s actually the product of government experiments and brainwashing. He decides to break the cycle of superhero antics by abolishing all governments and setting up a global utopia over which he rules as a god. It’s a pretty shocking concept, but when Neil Gaiman took over writing the book he did something even more audacious: he took the idea of a world without crime and ran with it. Instead of focusing on Miracleman, the book suddenly became a series of vignettes exploring how average people react to finding themselves in a utopia.

 

This was Gaiman’s first comics work and so it’s surprising that it’s some of his best. The stories in this volume are both wildly imaginative and emotionally grounded. We’re introduced to various people — a father making a pilgrimage to Miracleman to ask him to save his daughter’s life, a spy learning to live in a world without espionage and even a resurrected Andy Warhol questioning existence and getting back into silk screening — each of them trying to understand what it means to be human in a world that is suddenly (more or less) perfect. Fans of Gaiman’s Sandman series will find plenty to enjoy, and even non comic book fans will discover a book that proves comics don’t have to be violent to explore adult ideas.


 
 

Revised: May 25, 2016