Between the Covers / Shhhh... we're reading.   Photo of reading after bedtime
RSS this blog



+ Fiction

+ Nonfiction


+ Fiction



+ Fiction

+ Nonfiction

Author Interviews


In the News



Looking for More House of Cards?

posted by: May 5, 2014 - 8:00am

House of CardsDid you already binge-watch the second season of House of Cards on Netflix? Are you on pins and needles waiting to see where Frank and Claire’s machinations will lead them next? These novels filled with intrigue and scheming are just the thing to help ease your post-season two blues.


Before it was a hit American series, House of Cards was a popular British miniseries inspired by a trilogy of novels written by Michael Dobbs, a former advisor of Margaret Thatcher. The author recently revised House of Cards, the first novel in the trilogy, and it has been re-released. This thriller revolves around Chief Whip Francis Urquhart and his Machiavellian political maneuvering and Mattie Storin, a driven young reporter who pursues a story about corruption that she can’t resist. Like the television adaptation, the novel is ruled by political intrigue. The remaining novels in the trilogy will also be available later this year, so stay tuned for more plotting, greed and corruption.


For more political scheming, try Hilary Mantel’s Man Booker Prize-winning novel Wolf Hall, which brings 16th-century English politics to life. This fictional account of the life of Thomas Cromwell shows his rise to his position of advisor to the king and his skill as a consummate political schemer. The novel follows Cromwell’s behind-the-scenes maneuvering during the tumultuous reign of Henry VIII. Mantel’s well-researched, skillfully written novel is the first in a trilogy that you won’t want to miss.


If you’re looking for dark stories about ruthless, manipulative characters, Patricia Highsmith’s 1955 novel The Talented Mr. Ripley is the gold standard. Tom Ripley is entranced by the wealthy world of his new acquaintance Dickie Greenleaf. When Dickie’s father asks Tom to go to Italy and convince his wayward son to come home to New York, Tom agrees. He slowly becomes more and more obsessed with Dickie’s world and eventually assumes Dickie’s identity. Highsmith tells the story from Tom’s distorted yet charismatic perspective, leaving the reader both fascinated and horrified.


Revised: May 9, 2014