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Celebrating Differences

posted by: March 20, 2014 - 7:00am

Jacob's New Dress by Sarah and Ian HoffmanWalk down the toy aisles at your local store and you will see that the aisles are divided into two categories. The aisles with shelves lined in pink that contain the soft, sweet, nurturing toys are obviously marketed toward girls. Those blue shelves with the rough-and-tumble, mechanical looking toys built for speed and smashing things, well, that’s where the boys should shop. But what if your child doesn’t conform to society’s gender norms? Then perhaps you may enjoy Jacob’s New Dress by Sarah and Ian Hoffman, illustrated by Chris Case.


Jacob loves to play dress-up at school with his best friend, Emily. Although most boys in his class want to dress as a knight, fireman or dragon, Jacob is much happier when he puts on a pretty dress and imagines that he is a princess. Even though he is being teased by some of his classmates, Jacob musters up the courage to ask his mom if he can wear a regular dress, not just a playtime dress, to school. While his parents don’t immediately embrace the idea, Jacob’s mom helps him sew a dress to wear to school. With the support of his parents (“Well, it’s not what I would wear, but you look great” – Jacob’s Father) and his teacher (“I think Jacob wears what he’s comfortable in. Just like you do. Not very long ago little girls couldn’t wear pants. Can you imagine that?”), Jacob shows everyone that there is more than one way to be a boy.


Case’s soft, moving illustrations help set the mood of the story while the Hoffmans’ text conveys far more than a singular lesson. This story is great for teaching children about diversity, acceptance and self-confidence. The authors’ note at the end of the book helps to explain how all adults who play a role in raising, nurturing and educating children can make a difference in the lives of those children who do not conform to typical gender roles.


Revised: March 20, 2014