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Mississippi, 50 Years On

Mississippi, 50 Years On

posted by:
June 11, 2014 - 7:00am

Freedom Summer: The 1964 Struggle for Civil Rights in MississippiThe Freedom Summer MurdersAs the nation marks the 50th anniversary of the unspeakable murders of three young civil rights volunteers, two books introduce to young readers what happened in Mississippi in June of 1964 – and the legacy of that Freedom Summer. Susan Goldman Rubin takes a timeline approach in her middle grade book Freedom Summer: The 1964 Struggle for Civil Rights in Mississippi. Each chapter is titled with a time, such as “June 21, 1964, Afternoon,” the last time any of the three victims were seen alive. Pulling no punches, Rubin outlines the devastating reality of the ingrained racist attitudes among many of the people of Neshoba County, Mississippi, at that time, while making plain that those feelings extended to the all-white law enforcement authorities which aided and abetted in the killings. Maps, interviews and reproductions of photos and newspaper clippings all bring to light the horror of the situation that played out over the course of that summer.

 

Don Mitchell’s The Freedom Summer Murders covers similar territory but in a slightly different way, and for a teen audience. Chapters introduce us to the victims individually as each of the young men – James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner – receives his due. Interviews with their families, friends and other volunteers in Mississippi that summer help bring a better focus to who they were and why they felt so strongly for this cause. Additionally, Mitchell’s book fully examines the legacy of the summer and how their martyrdom ignited nationwide awareness, shock and fury. He includes the protracted legal battles and eventual reconciliation efforts that have helped move Mississippi and the state forward from this dark episode even to this day.

Todd

 
 

Birdy Bath Time

Birdy Bath Time

posted by:
June 11, 2014 - 7:00am

The Pigeon Needs a Bath!Caldecott Honor winner Mo Willems has brought back his beloved pigeon character in the funny new picture book The Pigeon Needs a Bath! The bus driver, this time clad in a shower cap and bathrobe, once again needs your help. Pigeon is absolutely, positively filthy. It’s been about a month, maybe even longer, since Pigeon had a bath. Goodness sakes, Pigeon is really starting to smell. He’s so stinky that the flies buzzing around Pigeon don’t want to be near him. Can you help convince Pigeon that he should take a bath?

 

Sixth in the Pigeon series, we last saw Pigeon two years ago co-starring in The Duckling Gets a Cookie!? Duckling makes an appearance in Pigeon’s new book in the form of a rubber ducky in the bath tub. Cartoon-like illustrations transition from muddy brown to bright, clean colors as Pigeon finally gets into the bath and starts to get clean. He’s having so much fun, he may never get out of the bath tub!

 

Whether it’s driving a bus, finding a hot dog, staying up late or wanting a puppy, Pigeon is sure to delight young children with his requests, which may also mimic some of the desires of the audience as well. Willems, both author and illustrator, has been awarded three Caldecott Honors, two Theodor Seuss Geisel Medals and Three Geisel Honors for his children’s books. And as your little ones progress from picture books to beginning readers, they are sure to also enjoy his Elephant & Piggie series.

Christina

 
 

Between the Cover’s 1,000th Post

The Rosie ProjectDon’t know what to read? Our librarians have been devouring books at rapid rates to answer this very question. Want to know what’s the newest, steamiest romance? The next literary breakout novel? There’s a post for that.

 

Since the blog’s conception, readers have been discovering great titles by learning from experts who write daily about the books they love for a variety of tastes. Not only are readers using posts to find up-and-coming titles, they are stumbling upon past gems they may have missed. To celebrate this milestone, we wanted to know what the most popular titles were out of our hundreds of posts. The results? The top three were Khaled Hosseini’s And the Mountains Echoed, John Grisham’s Sycamore Row, and Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn.

 

Along the way to this 1,000th post, we’ve expanded the ways we can satisfy you hungry readers. Now you can add your insights and observations in comments, get the story behind the story with exclusive author interviews and chat up The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion with us during our Facebook Book Club Chat on June 11 at 7 p.m.

 

As always, keep checking in with Between the Covers to keep your finger on the pulse…

Sarah Jane

 
 

Between the Covers with Susan Jane Gilman

Susan Jane GilmanThe Ice Cream Queen of Orchard StreetSpanning the 20th century, Susan Jane Gilman’s The Ice Cream Queen of Orchard Street is a rags-to-riches story about Lillian Dunkle, an indomitable Russian Jewish immigrant who builds an empire and becomes America's “Ice Cream Queen.” The story is narrated by Lillian, whose sharp wit and acerbic sense of humor are a stark contrast to her public image as kindly grandmother. Her personality is the heart of this character-driven story about the pursuit of the American dream.

 

Gilman recently answered some questions about her novel for Between the Covers readers. Grab a double scoop of your favorite ice cream, and read on to get to know Gilman and what inspired this fascinating new novel.

 

The ice cream business is an unusual starting point for a novel. What was it about that industry that caught your attention?

 

First of all, I love ice cream. And if you’re going to write a book, it better be about a topic that can sustain your passion and interest for years.

 

I initially got the idea for The Ice Cream Queen of Orchard Street when a friend and I were reminiscing about a local ice cream chain called Carvel. The owner, Tom Carvel, did his own tv commercials, in which he would rasp, “Please, buy my Carvel ice cream?” They were so hokey and homespun, they were sort of fabulous.

 

Googling “Tom Carvel” on a whim, I learned that he was a Greek immigrant, Tom Carvelas, who arrived in America penniless, only to build an enormous empire of ice cream franchises. Then I discovered that the Mattuses, the founders of Haagen-Daz, were two first-generation Jews who came from the tenements in the Bronx. These ice cream makers’ stories were classic American-immigrant-rags-to-riches sagas. This struck me as a wonderful basis for a novel.

 

You did an enormous amount of research while working on this novel. Did it included any taste-testing? (We hope so!) What is your favorite ice cream flavor?

 

By all means, I did taste-testing! As the founder of the Susan Jane Gilman Institute of Advanced Gelato Studies, why, it was imperative! I even contacted my inspiration – the Carvel Ice Cream Company itself – and arranged to work at a Carvel ice cream franchise out in Massapequa, Long Island. For two days, the owner let me go behind the scenes, learn the ropes and work as an ice cream maker serving customers. I loved every minute of it – except the owner was no dummy. He wouldn’t let me near that soft ice cream machine unsupervised. He must have known that, given the chance, I’d place my head directly beneath the server and just let the ice cream pour directly into my mouth.

 

There is also the Carpigiani Gelato University located just outside of Italy. I live about five hours away, in Geneva, Switzerland, so of course I had to go there as well, tour its Gelato Museum and take a Gelato Masterclass. I learned the science and mathematics behind gelato-making, made my own batch of gelato, and then of course, tasted my own concoction. I was in such heaven, I thought the top of my head would explode.

 

As for my favorite flavor, if there’s no decent mint-chip to be had, I am always happy with chocolate.

 

Lillian is a force to be reckoned with in the novel, and she has a very distinct voice from the first page. Did you have any real life inspiration for this formidable character?

 

I have to say, Lillian’s voice came to me in the proverbial flash. As I sat down to write the beginning, I heard her speaking, and that was it – I just had her. There are parts of her way of speaking that are reminiscent of my paternal grandmother — particularly her word choices — but the voice was unique to me. I felt as if I channeled it. In terms of her overall character, there’s a dash of Scarlett O’Hara and Leona Helmsley, I suppose, but really, I saw her as far more than simply mean and imperious, or a caricature talking ethnic schtick, or a punchline. I wanted her to be phenomenally complex and contradictory and compelling — the way all of us really are.

 

This is your first novel. What made you want to take on this new challenge? How did the process differ from writing nonfiction?

 

Ever since I was 8 years old, when I fell in love with reading and started to write my own short stories in little notebooks, I dreamed of writing a novel.  I always assumed that one day, I’d become the author of some sort of wonderful, fictional opus. Yet as I grew up, I kept getting sidetracked. Although I got an MFA in Creative Writing and published short stories and even won literary prizes, things in our culture kept pissing me off so much that I felt compelled to respond with books. Kiss My Tiara was in reaction to a dating guide that urged women to trick men into marrying them. Hypocrite in a Pouffy White Dress was conceived as a smart, funny counter-point to women’s memoirs that focused on either miserable childhoods, or being single and going shopping. Undress Me in the Temple of Heaven, the true story of a disastrous trip to China, was an antidote to several popular books in which women got over divorces by going to ashrams or renovating villas in Tuscany. I suppose I had to get three nonfiction books off my chest before I could finally get around to writing that novel.

 

I never expected to be a nonfiction author at all. It was an accident!  The Ice Cream Queen of Orchard Street may seem like a new direction, but it doesn’t feel like one to me at all. Finally, I’ve returned to my first love, to what I intended to do all along.

 

What is the best book you have read recently?

 

Let me give you three completely different ones: I loved Adam Johnson’s novel The Orphan Master’s Son; it was epic, disturbing, rich and unlike anything I’ve ever read, particularly given its setting. On a recent vacation, I read Maria Semple’s Where’d You Go, Bernadette; the first half made me laugh out loud from its smart, wicked wit. I was also profoundly moved by The Bosnia List, a new memoir co-written by Kenan Trebincevic and my friend Susan Shapiro. The story blew me away, and really enhanced my understanding of the Balkan conflict in an intimate way. I want everything when I read: humor, pain, transcendence, pleasure, education, enlightenment. Always, I want them to be intelligent. But I can never pick one favorite.

Beth

 
 

Everything Is Beautiful at the Ballet

Everything Is Beautiful at the Ballet

posted by:
June 9, 2014 - 8:00am

Cover art for Astonish MeEnter the world of professional ballet in Maggie Shipstead’s Astonish Me. In 1975, a young dancer named Joan is completely taken with the celebrated Russian dancer Arslan Rusakov, so much so that when Arslan contacts Joan to help him defect from his native country, Joan is happy to oblige. Although Joan longs to eventually dance with Arslan, she quickly realizes she is not in his league and will spend her career regulated to the corps de ballet in an American company. Joan finally decides to leave the company to settle down with Jacob, a scholarly boy who has adored her since high school and together they raise their son Harry. Joan eventually teaches dance in California, and soon garners the attention of a young dancer named Chloe, who will become her protégé. Harry also acquires an interest in dance, and Joan and Jacob realize that they have turned Harry into the next great dancer. This will have lasting effects on the future of their family.

 

Shipstead is gifted at creating compelling characters who will suffer longing and loss throughout the course of the novel. The situations are realistic and detailed, and the reader will get to know the lives of Jacob, Joan and Harry intimately throughout the course of the novel. There is enough information about professional ballet to keep the reader interested, but it is not overwhelming, and a novice to the world of dance will still be entertained. Shipstead won the L.A. Times Book Prize for First Fiction and the Dylan Thomas Prize for her debut novel Seating Arrangements. The audio version of the title is read by actress Rebecca Lowman who gives life to the characters with a delightful reading.  Astonish Me will appeal to Shipstead’s current fans as well as attract new readers who are looking for an interesting character-driven novel.

Doug

categories:

 
 

Three Sizzling Thrillers for Summer

Cover art for FaceoffCover art for That NightCover art for The Truth About the Harry Quebert AffairKick off your summer reading with one of these hot new thrillers! Members of the International Thriller Writers have joined forces to create Faceoff, an exciting new anthology of short fiction with a fun twist. Your favorite characters’ worlds are colliding in this collection of 11 brand new stories written by 23 of the hottest writers in the genre today. These stories pair popular characters like Lee Child’s Jack Reacher with Joseph Finder’s Nick Heller, M.J. Rose’s Malachai Samuels with Lisa Gardner’s D.D. Warren and Jeffery Deaver’s Lincoln Rhyme with John Sandford’s Lucas Davenport. Baldacci says, “This is a once-in-a lifetime opportunity for readers. It’s only through ITW that we were able to bring these literary legends toe to toe.” Faceoff should be at the top of your must-read list this summer.  

 

Chevy Stevens has won over many readers with her three previous thrillers, but with her new novel That Night, she is poised to be a breakout star. Toni spent 15 years in prison after being wrongly convicted of her younger sister Nicole’s murder. Now, she is on parole and back home on Vancouver Island. Toni is determined to rebuild her life, which includes avoiding contact with Ryan, who was convicted for the same crime and is determined to prove their innocence. Toni knows that in order to move forward, she must eventually uncover what happened on that long-ago summer night. Skillfully moving between past and present, Stevens reveals the shocking truth about Nicole’s death in this riveting novel.

 

Already a bestseller in France, Italy, Spain, Switzerland and the Netherlands, Joel Dicker’s The Truth about the Harry Quebert Affair will be published in the U.S. this summer.  When he is faced with writer’s block while writing his second novel, Marcus Goldman visits his mentor Harry Quebert in Somerset, New Hampshire. During Marcus’s visit, the remains of Nola Kellergan, the 15-year-old with whom Harry had an affair before she disappeared in August 1975, are found on Harry’s property, and Harry is the chief suspect in her murder. Marcus decides to exonerate Harry and write a book about it. The pages fly by as the reader is drawn deeper and deeper into this book within a book. With a colorful cast of characters, Dicker’s convoluted whodunit deserves a place on your summer reading list.

Beth

categories:

 
 

First Impressions

First Impressions

posted by:
June 5, 2014 - 8:00am

Cover art for Bright Before SunriseJonah Prentiss may be the only person at Cross Pointe High School who does not like Brighton Waterford. Brighton is popular, smart, pretty and universally admired – that is until Jonah transfers to Cross Pointe for his senior year of high school. Bright Before Sunrise by Tiffany Schmidt alternates between the two points of view, telling the story of how they are thrown together over and over again during the course of one evening.

 

Jonah is angry that his mother and new stepfather forced him to move from Hamilton to live in the snooty neighboring town of Cross Pointe. He decides to avoid making friends at his new school and to spend as much time as possible in his old town with his friends and girlfriend. Brighton, on the other hand, pretends that her life is perfect, while underneath she is still mourning her father’s death. As a result, she throws herself into school and extracurricular activities to avoid dealing with her feelings. Brighton has made it her mission to befriend everyone, so when Jonah spurns her friendship, she is annoyed and determined to make him change his mind. Jonah comes home early after being dumped by his girlfriend to find Brighton in the house after she unknowingly offers to babysit his little sister. His parents then force him to drive Brighton home. As the night continues, the two end up both willingly and unwillingly in each other’s presence.

 

Bright Before Sunrise convincingly tells Brighton and Jonah’s stories from both perspectives. Readers come to understand the challenges both are facing, and why they behave the way they do. Meanwhile, the relationship that develops between the two teens will keep readers guessing until the very end. Fans of Jennifer Smith’s books will enjoy Tiffany Schmidt’s latest teen novel.
 

Laura

 
 

Heartland Reunion

Heartland Reunion

posted by:
June 4, 2014 - 8:00am

Cover art for Shotgun LovesongsUp-and-coming novelist Nickolas Butler brings us Shotgun Lovesongs, an all-American tale of male friendship in Little Wing, Wisconsin. Although Hank, Ronny, Lee and Kip grew up together in the small rural town, they have grown into their own complex lives in strikingly different ways.

 

Hank stayed in the town to have a family and run his father’s farm, where it’s getting harder and harder to make ends meet. Ronny became a battered rodeo star who lost his career to crippling alcoholism. Singer-songwriter Lee took his show on the road and is now a famous yet humble millionaire rock star. Lastly, there’s Kip, the Bluetooth-wearing stock-market trader, who has come home to revitalize the tallest structure in town, the beloved old feed mill. The four friends are drawn together again by Kip’s impending wedding.

 

Told in alternating perspectives, the novel achieves its tension and ultimate heart from the honest portrayal of conflict and comradery between these soul-searching men.  Various masculine takes on marriage, love, loyalty and healing are all examined in this surprisingly rustic landscape.  Readers who enjoy character-driven plots and fulfilling endings will find themselves satisfied with and surprised by this debut novel.

 

Also, keep an eye out for Nickolas Butler’s highly anticipated forthcoming short story collection, The Chainsaw Soiree.

Sarah Jane

 
 

Discomfort Zone

Cover art for StringerHow does a young mathematician on the cusp of a Yale doctorate end up as a journalist in one of the world's bleakest places? For Anjan Sundaram, it was a desire to experience firsthand the sights, sounds and emotions of a tormented and misunderstood country he only knew from passing news briefs. His story, recounted in his new memoir, Stringer: A Reporter's Journey in the Congo, calls attention to a region of the central African continent often on the world's radar for the wrong reasons.

 

Sundaram times his arrival well.  It’s 2006, and there is cautious interest in the country's historic elections. Settling into the home of a friend's family in the lower class section of Kinshasa, he soon lands a job as a stringer for the Associated Press.  Through his experiences, he conveys the turbulent, repressive history of this beautiful, yet troubled land beset by sexual violence, killings and mutilations.  Despoiled by corrupt companies and governments, its abundance of natural resources has also cost the Congolese dearly. It is a place where death, as a rule, makes news only if it involves villages and armies or the U.N.  Sundaram raises inexplicable contradictions as well, like a boy who dies of typhoid because his family had no money for treatment but whose elaborate, expensive funeral draws hundreds.

 

For a reporter with no previous journalism training, Sundaram tells a good story with his sharp first-hand narrative and careful observations, especially of children. He acknowledges missteps along the way, and his vulnerabilities become part of the journey. The author, who currently lives in Rwanda, turned down a lucrative career at Goldman Sachs to tell us about this downtrodden African nation, long gripped by civil war. For readers interested in world politics and humanitarian crises here is a rare look by someone determined to tell the story.

Cynthia

 
 

A Dynamic Duo

A Dynamic Duo

posted by:
June 2, 2014 - 7:00am

Cover art for Let's Get CrackingCover art for Bok! Bok! Boom!Are you a fan of superheroes? Do you enjoy a funny mystery? Have you recently started to read chapter books? If you answered yes to these questions, you are sure to enjoy the Kung Pow Chicken series by Cyndi Marko. We first meet our superhero siblings, second grader Gordon Blue and his little brother Benny, in Let’s Get Cracking! Gordon and Benny are playing follow the leader at their Uncle Quack’s lab when Gordon trips and falls into a vat of toxic sludge and Benny follows. The boys are quickly rescued by their uncle, but later Gordon notices that he’s feeling a little strange.  Empowered by his new found superpowers, Gordon dons a disguise and becomes Kung Pow Chicken. Every good superhero needs a trusty sidekick, and Benny is eager to fill the role as Egg Drop. It’s not long before the town of Fowladelphia is in need of their help when everyone starts losing their feathers. Could Granny Goosebumps be behind the flock of naked chickens? And will they be able to solve the mystery before they get grounded?
 

Gordon and Benny return in the second book, Bok! Bok! Boom! While attending the opera, the main singer, Honey Comb, is kidnapped shortly after intermission.  Fortunately, our superheroes are never far from their super suits, and soon Kung Pow Chicken and Egg Drop are ready to get cracking. Could the visiting world-famous sound scientist Dr. Screech be behind this sinister plot? Will this pair of chicken crime fighters be able to save Honey Comb? And can Gordon keep his identity secret from the snooping reporter Sam Snood?
 

Perfect for readers transitioning into first chapter books, this new series is full of bright, colorful illustrations. Packed with action and a healthy dose of humor, kids will love the adventures of Kung Pow Chicken. If you enjoy the first two installments, you won't have to wait long for book three, The Birdy Snatchers, which will be out this June and is available for reserve now.

Christina