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Bloggers

 

Ghost Story

Ghost Story

posted by:
May 17, 2013 - 7:01am

The Frozen ShroudThere is said to be a ghostly woman roaming the grounds of Ravenbank Hall in the Lake District of England on Halloween night. Just before the First World War, a woman was murdered; her face bashed in and then covered with a shroud that had frozen to the remains.Thus begins the tale of The Frozen Shroud, by Martin Edwards, a mystery featuring crime historian Daniel Kind.

 

Years pass since the death of Gertrude Smith, but the story remained of an impassioned love affair and a jealous wife that took her own life after murdering the young woman.  In the present day, Ravenbank Hall has a new mistress, an Australian woman who managed to snag and marry the Hall’s elderly and infirm owner. Unfortunately for her, she winds up dead in the same fashion as poor Gertrude. Five years go by, and Daniel Kind is invited to a Halloween party near Ravenbank Hall, faced with many unanswered questions. Both crime cases seemed to be tied up too easily. The more recent murder may have been solved incorrectly. Will Daniel be able to find the solution before the killer strikes again?

 

The Frozen Shroud will appeal to a wide variety of readers. The chilling atmosphere of a sinister murder set on Halloween will give many readers chills. Written as an intriguing “whodunit”, this novel will please traditional mystery fans. The characters of Daniel Kind and Detective Chief Inspector Hannah Scarlett are also well defined and interesting, so readers who enjoy a strong protagonist will get caught up learning more about the detectives on the case. This novel is the sixth in Edwards’ Lake District mystery series.

Doug

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The Sociopath Next Door

Confessions of a SociopathMost of us have heard the term sociopath before, but we probably don’t know what it really means. We usually hear it in conjunction with criminal activity. It will probably surprise you to learn that one out of every 25 Americans is a sociopath, which means that it’s highly likely that someone you know fits the definition. Most sociopaths aren’t criminals or serial killers as television shows would lead us to believe.  They often live their lives without anyone around them realizing what they are. M. E. Thomas brings the reality of the disorder to readers in her unique new memoir Confessions of a Sociopath: A Life Spent Hiding in Plain Sight. Thomas (a pseudonym to protect her identity) is a successful attorney and law professor and the voice behind SociopathWorld.com. She teaches Sunday school at her church. She is intelligent, confident, and charming. She is one of the 4% of Americans who are sociopaths.

 

So what exactly is sociopathy? Sociopaths lack the moral compass that directs the lives of most people. They feel no remorse or empathy. Thomas shows readers the reality of life from a sociopath’s unique point of view. She explains that she is neither crazy nor evil. She does interact with others differently than the average person. Like all sociopaths, Thomas’s interactions with others often involve manipulation. To put it bluntly, she is a predator. She lives behind a mask, mimicking others’ behavior to pass for normal. She freely admits to destroying others’ careers to get ahead in her own and is willing to do whatever it takes to get what she wants. Thomas’s story is simultaneously engaging and unsettling. This fascinating first-person narrative may change your view of sociopaths.

 

Do you know a sociopath? The quiz found here may be both enlightening and unnerving. As Thomas explains, “It is statistically very probable that some people reading this book are sociopaths and have never realized it. If this is you, welcome home.”

Beth

 
 

An English Major Walks Into a Bar...

Tequila MockingbirdWitty Broadway actor and novelist Tim Federle has penned the ultimate book- and drink-lovers' dream in his beverage guide Tequila Mockingbird: Cocktails with a Literary Twist. He includes a short, clear introduction of the best tools (glassware and bar equipment) to use, techniques for making and decorating drinks, and the elements needed to create a well-stocked bar. An easy recipe for grenadine syrup, used in a number of the recipes, is a major improvement over many found on store shelves.

 

The bulk of the book is then divided into two large sections of recipes: ‘Drinks for Dames’, which focus on sweeter and spicier beverages; and ‘Gulps for Guys’, those that tend to pack more of a punch. Specific drinks meant for book clubs (and other parties) get their own chapter, as do nonalcoholic beverages. There are even a few quick recipes for nibbles to enjoy along with the potables. The real joy of this compilation is the hilarious wordplay that Federle uses in devising the cocktails’ names. A short commentary on each concoction adds a humorous touch. Every recipe is an amusing pun on a famous book’s title, but there are some that really hit the mark. Who can resist trying drinks with names like “Love in the Time of Kahlúa”, “A Rum of One’s Own”, or “Are You There God? It’s Me, Margarita”? Sure to be a popular gift exchanged among the literature and libations set, Tequila Mockingbird is a fun take on classic books and cocktails.

Todd

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Tweeting 101

Tweeting 101

posted by:
May 15, 2013 - 8:05am

Look Up! Bird-Watching in Your Own BackyardIn Look Up: Bird-Watching in Your Own Backyard, Annette LeBlanc Cate uses witty text, hand-drawn lettering, and pleasant, approachable colored-pencil art to encourage readers to notice the birds that share our environment. The author/illustrator covers a bevy of concepts relating to our feathered friends, and describes how she became an avian enthusiast and the simple ways that anyone can become one, too. In a casual, friendly style, the author advises beginners to start with a simple list of the birds that they see in their own surroundings. She is also an advocate for sketching and journaling. Easy-to-follow tips for better bird-watching, including useful ideas such as looking in the margins of a line of sight, and searching at dawn and dusk, allows the novice to spot birds that may otherwise be missed.

 

Identifying birds is covered at length, but not in the same style as a general field guide (which she highly recommends using as well). Instead, common birds are separated by color palette, shape, detail, and song. Throughout the book, familiar birds are introduced, and each page builds upon the previous until more involved concepts such as habitat, migration and classification are touched upon. Cate also stresses the value of keeping a sketchbook and encourages those who don’t believe they can draw to start with the basics and go from there. Even the endpapers are full of good information and funny quips. A useful bibliography and index, which also include bird commentary, completes the irreverent but highly informational package.

Todd

 
 

Fashion Star

Fashion Star

posted by:
May 14, 2013 - 8:05am

GorgeousTake the Cinderella story, stuff it into the bottle with the genie, add a healthy helping of absurd humor, and shake well. The result is the twistedly funny Gorgeous by screenwriter/playwright Paul Rudnick. Eighteen-year-old Becky, the literal embodiment of the term "trailer trash", is a pop culture junkie. She devours tabloids and news of all things Hollywood with near reverence. When her mother dies, she receives a mysterious offer that lands her in front of the world’s top designer, who will create three dresses that will change her life. All she has to do is say yes. Soon she is gracing magazine covers and mingling with the rich and famous. But deep inside, who is real -- "trailer trash" Becky, or "Hollywood It-girl" Rebecca?

 

Rudnick’s visual style plays heavily into Gorgeous, and the descriptions of the lavish and decadent celebrity lifestyle bring it to life in the mind’s eye. He discusses the transformative powers of fashion in an interview with NPR: "I love the idea of endowing clothing, or high fashion, with the power that we almost wish it had. I love taking that final step, of saying, 'OK, you're gonna put on this dress, and it's gonna do everything you could ever hope for and beyond.'" The true magic of Gorgeous is not in the fabric of these gowns, but rather in Rudnick’s ability to cut through this superficial world and find the true inner beauty in us all. Recommended for fans of Meg Cabot, though it does include some content for mature teen readers.   

Sam

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Bon Appétit

Bon Appétit

posted by:
May 13, 2013 - 7:45am

Table for SevenThe Girls' Guide to Love and Supper ClubsTwo new books invite readers to the scintillating world of gourmet dinner parties and secret supper clubs. Foodies will appreciate the mouthwatering menus while others will relish the relationships and romance.

 

Table for Seven by Whitney Gaskell takes place over the course of one year and twelve delightful dinner parties. Following a successful New Year’s Eve party, the group creates the Table for Seven Dinner Party Club and decides to take turns hosting monthly meals. But what starts as an epicurean excuse for get-togethers evolves into a test of relationships. Married couples Fran and Will and Jamie and Mark deal with lethargy, carping, and infidelity. Young widow Audrey has to move forward, while man-about-town Coop finds himself in love for the first time. Only, Leland, the elderly widower seems steady and at peace with his situation offering counsel to his younger friends.

 

In The Girls’ Guide to Love and Supper Clubs by Dana Bate we meet Hannah Sugarman who is in love and living with Adam in D.C.’s hip DuPont Circle. While her personal life is aces, her job at an influential economic think tank is not fulfilling. She has dreams of culinary school and chef’s coats. However, her academic parents and her would-be politico boyfriend think cooking is a nice hobby at best. When Adam dumps her, Hannah seizes the opportunity to create an underground supper club. With the help of her best friend Rachel, the monthly events soon become the hottest ticket in town. But supper clubs are illegal and she’s using her new landlord’s swanky townhome without his permission. This is a delightful romantic comedy featuring the charming Hannah who is looking for love and a meaningful career all while enjoying a cupcake or two along the way.

 

Maureen

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Publishing's Next Big Thing?

Publishing's Next Big Thing?

posted by:
May 10, 2013 - 7:01am

The Secret of Ella and MichaThe Edge of NeverWalking DisasterThe publishing industry has been buzzing about a subgenre dubbed New Adult literature. Although the content has existed for years, the tag is new, and these novels are taking publishing by storm. Many of them began as self-published e-books that were New York Times and USA Today bestsellers before they were released in print by traditional publishers. New Adult novels are geared toward readers who are 18-23 years old, but are also popular with adult readers of teen fiction. In New Adult books, the characters are older and their demeanor is more mature. Author Cora Carmack explains, “The characters' mind-sets are more adult, their actions are more adult, and the consequences of their actions are more adult.”

 

In Jessica Sorensen’s The Secret of Ella and Micha, Ella is a wild child who never met a rule she didn’t want to break, but when she left for college, she reinvented herself. Returning home is a challenge because she has to be the new Ella in the old Ella’s world. That’s especially hard with her next-door neighbor Micha in the picture. Micha knows everything about Ella, and he is determined to keep her in his life.

 

Camryn Bennett spontaneously boards a Greyhound bus on a journey to find herself, in J. A. Redmerski’s The Edge of Never. She never expected to meet Andrew Parrish, the sexy and mysterious guy who lives his life so differently from Camryn and pushes her to try things she never thought she would. Andrew has a secret, though, and that secret might push Camryn away forever.

 

In Jamie McGuire’s bestselling Beautiful Disaster, Travis Maddox and Abby Abernathy made a fateful bet that changed both of their lives. Now, McGuire brings readers Walking Disaster, which tells the same story from Travis’s perspective. Every story has two sides, and readers will finally get the other side of the story in this highly-anticipated companion novel.

Beth

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A Tale of Many Strengths

The World's Strongest LibrarianLibraries are often thought of as quiet places, with librarians acting as shushing gatekeepers, bespectacled and soft. Josh Hanagarne, a Utah librarian, doesn’t quite fit the stereotype. At 6 feet 7 inches tall, he lifts weights and can bend horseshoes with his hands. He can have trouble with the quiet part, too; he has struggled with Tourette Syndrome since elementary school. Hanagarne writes about strength training, Tourette’s, his Mormon faith, dating, and his urban public library experiences in The World’s Strongest Librarian: A Memoir of Tourette’s, Faith, Strength, and the Power of Family.

 

At six, Hanagarne’s parents noticed him repeatedly touching his lip to his nose while onstage during a school play. This initial involuntary movement bloomed into a variety of motor and verbal tics as he entered his teens. Encouraged by his father, he started gym workouts in an effort to exert control over the disorder as well as combat some of the hopelessness he feels when the tics are particularly troublesome. Here, “troublesome” can mean self-injurious, drawing blood, and he notes that his neurologist states that Hanagarne’s case is the most severe he’s seen.

 

Hanagarne, however, has not written a pity party. He is both an avid reader and a gifted writer and while parts of his story are heartbreaking, much of it is insightful, fascinating, and downright funny. His chapters are named with the Dewey Decimal classification numbers of the subjects contained within. Chapter 7 is "646.78 Marriage", which bodes well since Chapter 3 is "305.31 Lust Religious Aspects Christianity". He shares his evolving views on religion, his fears for his son, and his involvement with weight lifting and body awareness as a means to control his uncontrollable movements. His trenchant observations about public libraries and their patrons illustrate both the diversity of library users and his beliefs that enrich the lives of all those who walk through their doors. He also shares his thoughts and offers bookish advice on his blog also named The World's Strongest Librarian.

Lori

 
 

Mommy Scariest

Mommy Scariest

posted by:
May 9, 2013 - 7:01am

Motherhood Comes NaturallyShe’s back! Baltimore’s own Jill Smokler, also known as Scary Mommy, returns with a second book: Motherhood Comes Naturally (and other vicious lies). This irreverent and humorous journey through pregnancy, childbirth and parenthood will have mothers everywhere nodding in agreement - and in frequent fits of laughter. Each chapter is headed with common advice or words of wisdom (read: lies) often given to mothers and especially to first-time parents. Just a few examples of chapter titles: “You’ll Be Back to Your Old Self in No Time”, “You’ll Get More Sleep When They Are Older”, and “Going from Two to Three Kids Is a Breeze”. Smokler tackles each of these oft-quoted pieces by sharing her own experiences, which, as the book’s title suggests, provide strong evidence to the contrary.

 

Scary Mommy started as a blog, which Smokler began in order to keep herself sane as a stay-at-home mom with three kids (Lie #19: “Being Home With Your Kids Is the Most Fulfilling Job”). She developed an online following, and eventually published her first book, Confessions of a Scary Mommy. At turns wittily sarcastic and reflective, Motherhood Comes Naturally shows that one can feel driven to insanity by their kids, but of course still love them. Appreciating that motherhood is neither perfect nor precious, Smokler encourages mothers to build camaraderie and support each other, not tear each other down about different parenting styles. For those with a sense of humor and a willingness to embrace the mommy role with all its flaws, this book is for you. And to all the mommies out there: Happy Mother’s Day! (but know that “Mother’s Day Is All About You” is Lie #14.)

Melanie

 
 

Babe in Baltimore

Becoming Babe RuthBefore he was 'Babe', George Herman Ruth was a troubled boy growing up on the familiar streets of Baltimore. These formative years are documented by Matt Tavares in Becoming Babe Ruth, his richly illustrated and engaging homage to the "Sultan of Swat". Already uncontrollable at age seven, George was left at Saint Mary’s Industrial School for Boys by his father. There George was forced to abide by the strict rules which were rigorously enforced. But, after all the chores and schoolwork were complete, Brother Matthias would let the boys play baseball. Under Brother Matthias’ expert tutelage, George focused on fundamentals and perfected every aspect of his game. His hard work was rewarded when he was signed to a minor league contract with the Baltimore Orioles. It was here that George became Babe, and Tavares is careful to share the origin of the famous nickname with curious readers. From Baltimore, Ruth went to Boston and eventually ended up with the New York Yankees, with whom he had a long and storied career. Along the way, the Bambino achieved an unprecedented level of superstardom.

 

Tavaras does an outstanding job of outlining important moments in Babe’s professional life, but also documents lesser known details of his life as a young boy in Baltimore. The realistic mixed-media illustrations bring Babe to life and readers get a real sense of his charm, his outsize personality, and his love of the game he played so well for so long. But even as Ruth became a household name, he never forgot where he came from. Tavares notes his repeated generosity and gratitude to St. Mary’s and the men who shaped him. An author’s note, statistics, and bibliography are appended and complete this uplifting story of the most famous baseball player in history and his connection to Charm City.

Maureen