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Big Magic

posted by: October 22, 2015 - 7:00am

Big Magic coverIf you’re an artist of any kind, if you aspire to live a life driven by curiosity, if you believe that inspiration and creativity are literal magic, then you will find a kindred spirit in Elizabeth Gilbert, author of Big Magic: Creative Living Beyond Fear.


Gilbert is best known for her 2006 memoir Eat, Pray, Love about her life-changing travels to Italy, India and Indonesia. But Gilbert advises that it’s not necessary to pack up and travel the world for the sake of your art—you can and should make room for creativity and magic in your everyday life, and Big Magic provides the roadmap. She also warns against putting unnecessary pressure on your creativity or burdening it by asking it to financially support you. This advice could feel inauthentic coming from a writer who does support herself with her art, but Gilbert is so earnest in her beliefs, it’s impossible to begrudge her success.


Instead of advocating fearlessness, Gilbert says that we should allow plenty of room for our fear, but realize that it should not control our creative lives. She also dismisses the popular stereotype of the tormented artist. Instead, she suggests that your work should be a positive collaboration between you and your creativity. Gilbert theorizes that ideas are incorporeal entities longing to be brought into existence and that if we aren’t receptive to them, they will knock at the next artist’s door. She relates an anecdote about a novel she failed to write, only to discover years later that a very similar idea had magically found Ann Patchett.


After writing Big Magic, Gilbert didn’t feel like she was finished with the subject of creativity and began a podcast called Magic Lessons where she and guests, including Patchett and Cheryl Strayed counsel writers and artists who are having issues in their creative lives.


Beautifully written and full of fresh ideas on the nature of creativity, Big Magic is sure to become recommended reading along with classics like Julia Cameron’s The Artist’s Way and Anne Lamott’s Bird by Bird.


Pretty Girls

posted by: October 21, 2015 - 7:00am

Pretty Girls by Karin Slaughter coverDo bad things happen to pretty girls? Yes, they do according to Karin Slaughter’s latest novel, Pretty Girls. A gripping, fast-paced, intense thriller that keeps you on the edge of your seat. From the first page she grabs you by the throat and does not let go until the very last word.


Pretty Girls begins with Claire Scott witnessing her husband Paul’s brutal murder. Paul was her provider, lover, soulmate and family for 20 years. She even disowned her sister, Lydia, when she accused him of attempted rape. She trusted Paul implicitly, while Lydia was a thieving alcoholic and drug addict. But how well did she really know him. Yes, he was by her side when her father committed suicide and endlessly filled the hole in her heart from her eldest sister’s disappearance. But now, 20 years later, another pretty girl has gone missing in their town and Paul has been murdered. Are these two events connected? Was Lydia telling the truth? As she moves forward from his death, Claire learns that Paul had secrets. But how deep are those secrets and how do they affect her and her sister Lydia? Who can she trust to help her find the truth? Masterfully told through both Claire and Lydia’s voices with excerpts from their father’s journal before his suicide, Slaughter weaves a tale of both deception and shock.


Filled with plenty of “aha!” moments only to be followed with “but what about…?” moments, Slaughter keeps you guessing to the very end. As you learn more about Paul Scott with each page, discovering the truth will become your mission as much as Claire’s. So much so that you may even suffer a sleepless night or two, but you will not regret it!


Looking for other twisting tales of deception like Pretty Girls? Try The Good Girl by Mary Kubica and Luckiest Girl Alive by Jessica Knoll.



The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace and Babbage

posted by: October 21, 2015 - 7:00am

The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace and Babbage coverAutomatons! Higher mathematics! World domination! The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace and Babbage by Sydney Padua contains everything inquiring minds could ask for. A history of the nascent development of computing, it contains a detailed and thoroughly researched account of the collaboration between Ada Lovelace and Charles Babbage in their creation of the Analytical Machine (now known as a computer). Not limited to just explanations of the mechanical and theoretic processes, Padua also delves into contextualizing the machine’s creation with profiles of the people, culture and time period that had an influence on its formation. Any dryness you might expect of such subject matter is diverted by speculation of what Sherlockian adventures could have happened if the groundbreaking machine actually managed to be produced in the Victorian era of its imagining.


Padua’s zeal for her subject is infectious and her research has yielded amusing vignettes of the characters who were involved in the creation of computation, including cameos by George Eliot, Lewis Carroll and Queen Victoria. Despite her frequent demurrals to expertise, she concisely breaks down the complex engineering of her subject (with diagrams!) so that it is understandable for those of us who aren’t engineers, mathematicians or wizards. Be warned: It is text heavy for a graphic novel, primarily because the number and density of footnotes rivals those of the late Terry Pratchett. Like The Great Pratchett, however, the footnotes contain amusing digressions whose levity make them worth the effort. 




Lair of Dreams

posted by: October 20, 2015 - 7:00am

Lair of Dreams by Libba BrayIt takes a certain kind of writing magic to transport readers so completely into the past, but that is exactly what Libba Bray does in Lair of Dreams, her latest installment of The Diviners series. With careful attention to detail she brings to life New York City during the Roaring 20s with all its slang, speakeasies and the social issues bubbling just beneath the glossy surface. From this setting Bray weaves a spine-tingling ghost story that will keep readers up late into the night.


The Diviners introduced us to Evie O'Neill, a young girl heading to New York City in search of parties and good times. Beneath her flapper façade she hides a special ability, and she soon finds herself drawn into a much stranger circle of friends chasing down a paranormal serial killer tormenting the city.


In this sequel, a strange “sleeping sickness” is striking citizens in Chinatown, killing more victims each night and reaching out into the city. This group of gifted teens must face the terrifying and unknown world of dreams to stop a new ghostly killer. This time, they are joined by Ling Chan, a dream walker who can communicate with the dead. Meanwhile, Sam, a fellow Diviner, and Evie have uncovered some strange clues about why they have these powers, and how much danger they may be in because of them.


This engrossing book has a little of everything including horror, humor and history in perfect measure. 




posted by: October 20, 2015 - 7:00am

ApocalyptiGirl coverAndrew MacLean, a rising powerhouse in the world of comics, gives a fresh, intimate take on the ever popular post-apocalyptic genre in ApocalyptiGirl: An Aria for the End Times. Written and illustrated by MacLean, ApocalyptiGirl is an in-depth character study of sorts, following Aria, a loner with a mysterious mission, and her cat, Jelly Beans, as they navigate the crumbling remains of civilizations past.


MacLean weaves fresh concepts together with some of the more familiar tropes of the post-apocalyptic genre. Sure, there are wandering bands of marauders and gunfights aplenty, but Aria isn’t your typical gruff drifter. She is an enthusiastic and often cheerful character with loads of pep and an unending well of affection set aside for her trusty feline sidekick. To categorize Aria only by her zest for life is to discredit the depth that MacLean has built into this character. Readers will follow her through scenes that range from serene to violent and heartbreaking to joyous, each revealing complex new facets of Aria’s personality.


You won’t find any barren badlands in this post-apocalyptic landscape. Aria’s world is one of cozy subway hideouts and sprawling ruins long reclaimed by nature, all vividly depicted in MacLean’s unmistakable style. Quiet moments of solitude and bloody action sequences alike are made equally impressive by the precise line work and expressive muted color palette.


ApocalyptiGirl is a masterfully crafted science fiction slice-of-life story that will have readers rooting for Aria from start to finish. For maximum post-apocalyptic fun, pair with Mad Max: Fury Road!


Those Girls

posted by: October 19, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Those Girls by Chevy StevensSearching for a dark, suspenseful adult fiction novel that will steal your attention the moment you focus your eyes on page one? Sit down and relax. I have good news. I am happy to inform you that your search is over, my friend. Those Girls by Chevy Stevens is the book you’ve been looking for. Stevens' words gripped me with her opening sentence: "We'd only been on the road for an hour but we were almost out of gas." Sounds suspenseful, right? Well, keep reading.


Those Girls takes place in 1997 and follows the lives of three Campbell sisters: Dani, Courtney and Jess. They are young and unfortunate girls who live with their alcoholic father on a remote ranch in a small Western Canadian town called Littlefield. The Campbell sisters live a hard-knock life, and things only get worse once they commit a crime. The Campbell sisters create a plan to flee to Vancouver and start anew. Unfortunately, their plan hits a roadblock once the sisters run into danger that changes their lives forever. Fast forward to 2015, the Campbell sisters are adults living secretive lives in Vancouver. Although their tragic past is buried halfway in their minds, it comes back to haunt them and puts their loved ones in grave danger.


Those Girls is a fast-paced thriller, a guaranteed page-turner or your money back. I was just kidding about your money back. Seriously readers, add this book to your “must read” list. Caution, you may have trouble putting it down once you have it in your hands. Readers who enjoyed Gillian Flynn’s New York Times Bestselling novel Dark Places will love Steven’s Those Girls. Stevens’ is also a New York Times Bestselling author of Still Missing and That Night. She also penned Never Knowing and Always Watching. To find out more about Stevens, visit her website at




posted by: October 19, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Mate by Tucker MaxIn his latest book Mate: Become the Man Women Want, Tucker Max teams with professor of evolutionary science Geoffrey Miller to answer one of the biggest questions men have in dating: What do women want? Max is most well-known for his best-seller I Hope They Serve Beer in Hell where he recounts many of his dating mishaps in humorously crass anecdotes. In this more serious book, Max and Miller deviate away from the typical social and cultural approaches men take in trying to understand what women want — ideas that women want “family men,” or men who are strong or men who look or act a certain way. Aren’t there many different types of men, and don’t women have many different preferences?


Instead, Max and Miller use evolutionary psychology, hunter-gatherer anthropology, behavioral genetics and other quantifiable methods to study what has attracted women to men since prehistoric times. They take this research and break it down into five principles which can then be followed through five steps, almost like a scientific reference manual on how to date. Max and Miller emphasize the power of female choice when it comes to mating. Rather than figuring out how to approach or seduce a woman into liking them, men are better off understanding a woman’s perspective and then becoming the best man they can be so that women will choose them.


Although written by two men, Max and Miller’s claims about what women want and how women choose men are surprisingly accurate. The combination of Max’s candid commentary and Miller’s logical scientific observation make this book a truly entertaining read, whether you are a man looking for advice or a woman who is curious to see how men approach dating.


The Other Serious

posted by: October 16, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Other Serious by Christy WampolePrinceton professor and essayist Christy Wampole weeps for the millennial generation. In her collection The Other Serious, she discusses America’s cultural reliance on irony to get through work and school days, muses on the rapid rise and fall of hipsterdom as a fashion trend and state of mind, laments the lack of conversation between young and old people in America and pities the overly serious states in which many people conduct their lives. Her essays are a beautifully written series of polite reality checks arranged to highlight how deeply American youth is entrenched in consumer culture.


In “The Great American Irony Binge,” Wampole diagnoses today’s espresso-sipping, Apple-worshipping, tight-jeaned and handlebar-mustached facetious youth with chronic boredom and hopelessness, positing that a lack of any clear life direction and the Sisyphean nature of the U.S. college experience has caused them to chisel broken facades and congregate to strengthen the radiance of their collective “It’s cool, man, everything’s cool” attitude. In “Toward a Sterile Future,” she wonders whether our perpetual quest to streamline every aspect of human life with consumer technology puts us at risk to become complacent. She imagines a future in which there is no such thing as an artisan and people are one more cloud-based service away from becoming the machines on which they rely for daily function. She segues this into an assertion that human interactions feel weird because people are usually enshrouded in the snuggie of online anonymity when conversing. Face-to-face interactions are becoming rarer and rarer, to the point where they are beginning to feel surreal. In “On Awkwardness,” Wampole suggests that simply embracing the weirdness and remembering that we are all individuals with different values and experiences could lead towards a new social enlightenment.


Wampole offers gentle criticism while never disparaging any group or individual, and does so with a style that embraces the beauty of simplicity. Splashes of effervescence and relevant cultural references make her essays incredibly engaging, and her arguments foster creative evaluation in the best way possible. Perhaps the best way to summarize The Other Serious is with this quote from the titular essay: "I want to understand what has forced half the population into an unbearably heavy seriousness and the other half into an unbearably light, confettilike eruption of irony."








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